• A friendly and periodic reminder of the rules we use for fostering high SNR and quality conversation and interaction at Stormtrack: Forum rules

    P.S. - Nothing specific happened to prompt this message! No one is in trouble, there are no flame wars in effect, nor any inappropriate conversation ongoing. This is being posted sitewide as a casual refresher.

FREE week long CHASE TOURS in 2006 possible

I would encourage chasers to do TV - chasers tell the most accurate chase stories.

The problem with this is, so many other hands touch the interview tape before it sees the light of day. Regardless of what they actually get on tape, producers will spin it into the story they wanted all along. I think we all know how boring chasing is in reality, most of the time. I just don't see a TV producer clinging to the concept of "real" chasing coverage.

It just isn't good television.
 
I would encourage chasers to do TV - chasers tell the most accurate chase stories.

The problem with this is, so many other hands touch the interview tape before it sees the light of day. Regardless of what they actually get on tape, producers will spin it into the story they wanted all along. I think we all know how boring chasing is in reality, most of the time. I just don't see a TV producer clinging to the concept of "real" chasing coverage.

It just isn't good television.

I am with Shane here. Every chaser is free to do as they please, but the media has a track record of following through with their agenda regardless of how responsibly a chaser/chasers portray themselves or chasing.

I have seen it run the gamut from being done OK, to simply bad, to totally infuriating (and it is trending worse IMO). The only way I would talk to the media now is if it were in a live to air situation. I chase for my own enjoyment, not to have some ego boost from being on the Tee Vee.

I had a taste of media attention in 1992 when I first chased the US Plains. (interviewed by ABC News and mentioned in an exceptionally well done Dallas Morning News feature) I hadn't expected it, and enjoyed it at the time. Especially, the DMN piece as it was so well done (it set the standard for me of what chaser coverage should be!), and it is still on their site, but you have to pay to read it. I thought it was an opportunity to accurately relfect what chasing is and it met my expectations.

But the way the media handles chasing (and the media in general) has gone steadily down hill in my eyes since that time, and I have no interest in the generally hype and inaccuracy driven coverage of chasing that is currently the norm.

And as for wanting to be on reality TV? Pull-ease. And I don't consider any of that stuff close to reality - it is all about getting good looking people on TV for almost free. Notice that a picture is required?
 
The problem with this is, so many other hands touch the interview tape before it sees the light of day. Regardless of what they actually get on tape, producers will spin it into the story they wanted all along.
I certainly have to agree that this is the norm. Having been in the news media for quite awhile, I can tell you that it amazed even me how my story sometimes sounded after an editor finished with it. :?

I also agree that the genre that has come to be known as "reality TV" is anything but. But there are a few exceptions out there. The show that started it all was "COPS," and they actually did a pretty good job of presenting reality. The only problem there is that the cops on the show tended to get all self-conscious about the cameras and talk and act differently than they normally did. It usually didn't significantly distract from the reality of the scenario though. The only problem with COPS was that the evil editors edited out all of the routine BS calls to make it look like an 8 hour shift was nothing but constant shootings and pursuits.

If somebody can produce something around chasing, using COPS as their model instead of "Survivor" or "The Real World," then they may have a winner on their hands. It's all up to the producer. But it's a little silly to say that it can't be done.
 
You guys are so good at jumping to conclusions and assuming things. While it may be the case, (I dont know) where was it said officially that this was going to be a reality show anyway??? For all we know, the final result of this may be 25 mins of a one hour show. The producers may have an idea in mind about a show (not series) about severe weather, where only a portion of the show is about chase tours. The fact that it is for a whole week, may just be to confirm some good storms will be filmed for the show.

Doug Raflik
[email protected]
http://www.wxnut.net
 
I think the problem with this kind of show is simple: storms. Productions are very expensive I would imagine, so I doubt they can spend a month following a chase tour around hoping for storms/tornadoes. Sounds like an interesting idea though.

Mike
 
That's why they're looking for "interesting" people! To fill the down time!
 
Well I would be lying if I didn't say I am at least a little skeptical and concerned on what effect a television show would have on chasing that takes a less science/educational slant for a more entertaining one. Again, not saying that is the case here or it is even going to happen but it does concern me just a bit. Seems like reality shows are very popular right now and channels like Fox & Bravo seem to have a reality show for just about everything. If that was the case I imagine it could have a significant impact on chasing as a hobby similar to that of the release of Twister.

-Scott Olson
 
I noticed ALOT of other "chasers" get jealous, when they see another chaser get recognition via TV, or other types of publicity. IMO I see nothing wrong with going on TV -- Numerous chasers have done it, and if I was offered to go on a television show, then I would certainly take it. Anybody whom says they wouldn't is a liar, and are probably jealous and therefore make fun of the people that DO get on television or in newspapers, etc etc.

Nick, I don't think many people have a problem with other chasers getting recognition on TV, I certainly don't; however, when it comes to the "Twister Sisters" representing the chaser community, one can get a little nervous at the idea.. I will just leave it at that... just my 2 cents...
 
That sounded a little harsh, I have nothing against the twister sisters, but if you ARE going to be doing a TV show, and be representing the whole community where the public will base their opinions about us, have a individual who has many years experience be the focal point. Such as the Rhodens, or Tim Marshall?
 
Well now we're back to the show-business aspect.

If Gene, Tim, and Melanie submit their pictures to any producer, who do you think they're going to pick? :lol:

There's the whole gimmick angle of a couple of girls that is appealing to a wider audience.

And when it comes to the general public, they wouldn't know the difference between Gene Rhoden or Nick Grillo. As long as somebody can talk a good game and find a storm, they're all the same as far as the average tv viewer is concerned.
 
I hope they pick me...I dont care what spin or twist they wanna put on it, I like the whole idea - Ill go along with it
what the F do any of us have to loose?
 
Well, at this point, all I see is a thread about a possible free chase week (which I am very interested in). I don't see anything other than that, and until a Q&A happens that either confirms or denies the speculation, its just one more thing for the big grain of salt I have out back.

Ofcourse, I think a nice lively discussion on storm chasing and reality TV would be good, but I think elsewhere would be a good spot to have it.

Just my two cents, thats all.
 
Shoot, I'm interested now. I wouldn't mind doing this. Go on a chase with somebody who knows what they are doing and not have to pay for it? Why not? And good for THEM - I hope they have a great show, and it rates right up there in the ratings too. MY offer still stands though. ***I'll pay ALL costs if someone wants to chase with ME next year. Gas, hotels, and everything but food. (I know how some of you eat). I have the norm - police scanner, laptop with unlimited data connect, etc. I drive a 2004 Intrepid w/ a moon roof, so you can get great overhead pics. The reason I'll do this is because I can't download images, take pics, drive, read maps, and everything else at the same time. I also need someone with a little more experience than I have. I usually stay in the Embassy Suites or compatible, smoke, don't drink, and I'm serious about this. NO costs to you, just KNOW what you're doing and have fun.
 
Bob Schaefer wrote:
LOL, I just want you to see this pathetic CO landspout, Mark:

http://community.webshots.com/photo/191462...116301154KLoOoH

Pardon the interruption.....carry on.

Bob
Yes Bob, I admit that there have been some spectacular Colorado supercell tornadoes. Last Chance and the southern Washington County area is famous for having some of the most spectacular twisters in our lovely state (luckily it's a remote area). Examples of beautiful supercell spawned tornadoes in the Centennial state would be your tornado from June 10, 1999; the Limon tornado, rated F4 from June 6, 1990; the Elba tornado, rated F3 from July(I think) of 1996; two twister sisters (sorry for ripping off your name, Melanie and Peggy!) rated F1 and F2 respectively from May 31, 1996 at Fort Morgan; the Julesberg/Big Springs tornado of June 12, 2004; and the Riverside Reservoir tornado of July 21, 2000 (I actually saw this tornado from about fifteen miles away to the east from my posistion on the west edge of Fort Morgan; it was gorgeous, all backlit by the sun, etc., and I didn't have my damn camera! :roll: ) But these are rare examples, as most CO storms don't remain discrete very long and usually quickly become HP hailers as they race northeast/east/southeast depending on what type of flow we are under. Most just don't have the chance to remain isolated from other storms and produce the spectacular tornadoes which their brothers farther east across the Kansas state line have :( . The environment here is generally not favorable for highly visible, intense tornadoes. The ones that occur are flukes and rarities in the Colorado tornadic pattern. Sorry about getting off topic, but I felt this needed to be adressed.
 
Continuing off topic.......

Mark, your point is well taken, and I agree for the most part. But you list quite a few examples, and I'll add the Ellicott tornado (was that 2000?), the Trinindad tornado of May 28, 2001 (although that was kind of "landspouty"), and the LaJunta tornado (2002?) to the list. Now, we're coming up with a pretty good list to then turn around and say "rare". Consider the relatively small area of land that E CO represents compared to whole states such as KS or NE, and I suggest that they aren't really so "rare".

Just for the record, "Big Springs" was June 10.

Bob
 
I have rescinded the lock on this topic. I did this absentmindedly, and it's certainly not standard operating procedure. I will ask Peggy and Melanie to provide further information if they so desire.

I do request that off-topic messages be carried over to a different thread.

Tim
 
I'd never thought of it before, but this would probably make the perfect reality TV show. Confined spaces, long hours on the road, interspersed with short bursts of near-death experiences. If this ISN'T some sort of reality show casting call, someone out there ought to pitch the idea to one of the networks. :)

Hey, when people get voted off the island, they just get dropped off of the van. In front of a wedge!
 
Just a thought. Though there's shows about chasers and storms on the National Geographic and TLC and Discovery which spike interest in Chasing storms in turn getting more people out chasing who may not know what they are doing. As a question would this not get tons more people out on the road making it even more congested.

In turn I hope this show if it airs shows the "reality" of chasing and encourages safe and responsible chasing which from what i have seen with the sister's that they are just that safe and responsible.
 
...would this not get tons more people out on the road making it even more congested.
I think that is a legitimate concern. But I speculate that when it comes down to it, maybe one in several thousand people who say, "Hey, that's cool! I wanna do it!" will ever actually do it. Three things will turn them away:

1. Time. When they realize that storm chasing is not a day-trip kind of thing, most people will concede they don't have [or won't make] time for it. Most of them won't even have time for a SKYWARN class.

2. Money. In addition to the work they're going to miss, they will also be quite dismayed by the costs involved. Most of them don't already have a laptop with ThreatNet, a Ham radio, or a gas card that somebody else pays for.

3. Difficulty. Once they realized that it's not as simple as listening to NOAA and then jumping in the car when the alarm goes off, most will drop out. And of those few who decide to try and learn a little meteorology will quickly say, "F this!"

I think it's like becoming a doctor or a fireman or a cop. Everybody who watches TV says they want to do it at one time or another, but darn few ever do it.
 
I was thinking a true reality show about storm chasing might cut down on the amount of people that take up chasing. If they show the amount of time, money and frustration involved, people might think twice before taking up storm chasing. I think that this whole thing is a good idea, as long as the producers keep it realistic and don't twist what this great chase team has to say to hype it up and make it something that it's not. Good luck Twister Sisters!


edit: I was typing and didn't see the above post.
 
Just a thought. Though there's shows about chasers and storms on the National Geographic and TLC and Discovery which spike interest in Chasing storms in turn getting more people out chasing who may not know what they are doing. As a question would this not get tons more people out on the road making it even more congested.

In turn I hope this show if it airs shows the "reality" of chasing and encourages safe and responsible chasing which from what i have seen with the sister's that they are just that safe and responsible.

Yeah I share the same concerns. At least the shows of NGC seem to have some scientific material. If it was a 'reality' show similar to the countless ones on television I would expect it to be a lot of action. Making storm chasing look like some sort of ultimate thrill-ride. Im sure if this was the case you could count on more un-educated people jumping in their car when the sirens go off. It's still a free country and anyone who wants to chase certainly has the right. I hope like Kurt that if this does come to happen that it does potrary storm chasing in a responsible and somewhat realistic light... Of course if its a FOX show we're all screwed..LOL

-Scott Olson
 
...would this not get tons more people out on the road making it even more congested.
I think that is a legitimate concern. But I speculate that when it comes down to it, maybe one in several thousand people who say, "Hey, that's cool! I wanna do it!" will ever actually do it. Three things will turn them away:

1. Time. When they realize that storm chasing is not a day-trip kind of thing, most people will concede they don't have [or won't make] time for it. Most of them won't even have time for a SKYWARN class.

2. Money. In addition to the work they're going to miss, they will also be quite dismayed by the costs involved. Most of them don't already have a laptop with ThreatNet, a Ham radio, or a gas card that somebody else pays for.

3. Difficulty. Once they realized that it's not as simple as listening to NOAA and then jumping in the car when the alarm goes off, most will drop out. And of those few who decide to try and learn a little meteorology will quickly say, "F this!"

I think it's like becoming a doctor or a fireman or a cop. Everybody who watches TV says they want to do it at one time or another, but darn few ever do it.

I think it certainly could bring more people out intially with a pre-concieved notion based on the program. But I agree that eventually the amount of driving, money, education and patience that is needed will weed out all but the ones who are truly interested. Still I think the possibility of this having a significant impact on the chase community is possible.
 
Back
Top