• Stormtrack's forum runs on Xenforo forum software, which will be undergoing a major update the evening of Wednesday, Feb 28th. The site may be down for a period while that update takes place.

Confirmed Tornadoes of the 11/15 Outbreak (50 as of 24/05z)

Nashville CWA</span>[/b]
1) Benton County NW of Camden - F1
2) Benton County NNE of Camden - F2
3) Houston County SW of Erin - F2
4) Houston County SSE of Erin - F1
5) Houston County SSE of Erin - F0
6) Montgomery County SW of Clarksville - F1
7) Montgomery County SSW of Clarksville - F0
8.) Montgomery County SSW of Clarksville - F0
9) Montgomery County SSE of Clarksville - F2
10) Benton County S of Camden - F0
11) Humphreys County SW New Johnsonville - F1
12) Dickson County SW of Charlotte - F2
13) Dickson County NW of Charlotte - F0

<a href=\'http://www.sams-weather.com/weather/nov15_wayne_tn.txt\' target=\'_blank\'>14) Wayne County near Collinwood - F2 - 6 miles long - 100 yards wide </a> <span style=\'color:red\'>*1 injury*

15) Robertson County SW of Springfield - F0
16) Davidson County NNW of Nashville - F0
17) Maury County N of Columbia - F0
18.) Williamson County SW of Franklin - F0
19) Sumner County E of Hendersonville - F0


As of 00z Thursday, November 24, fifty tornadoes have been confirmed across seven different states, which resulted in one death and at least fifty-three injuries. This list will continue to be updated as damage survey results come in.

NWS Nashville - 19 tornadoes
NWS Paducah - 13 tornadoes
NWS Memphis - 5 tornadoes
NWS Louisville - 3 tornadoes
NWS Little Rock - 3 tornadoes
NWS Indianapolis - 2 tornadoes
NWS Birmingham - 1 tornado
NWS Huntsville - 1 tornado
NWS Lincoln, IL - 1 tornado
NWS North Webster - 1 tornado
NWS St. Louis - 1 tornado
 
Nick beat me to it. 300 miles wide. Jeff...let me know when your masters thesis defense on this tornado is so I can come and watch. Always been curious about a 300 yard wide tornado let along a 300 mile wide one. :D
 
I also heard a report from CNN that there was at least one Fatality in KY when a tornado plowed through a trailer park. Apparently the occupant was inside when the storm hit, and the trailer caught fire somehow. Anyone else hear about this?
 
Regarding the Benton, KY tornado, I have also heard the report of the fatality...SPC has it listed on their tornado stats page as well.


Rob
 
As stated in my forecast thread I was expecting F3 and less primarily due to amount of instability even though dynamics strongs. So far this seems to be the case and I have seen no F4 / F5 damage on any pics shown on tv or elsewhere so far.
 
Looks like Hopkins county tornado is preliminarily rated F4. If true my I suppose my forecast didn't catch that one even though the majority were F3 and under. It was primarily a hunch anyway based on what I was seeing when doing my forecast so not guaranteed to be entirely accurate. At 210 mph though it is only rated 3 mph over the F3 top range.
 
Originally posted by Bill Tabor
Looks like Hopkins county tornado is preliminarily rated F4. If true my I suppose my forecast didn't catch that one even though the majority were F3 and under. It was primarily a hunch anyway based on what I was seeing when doing my forecast so not guaranteed to be entirely accurate. At 210 mph though it is only rated 3 mph over the F3 top range.
Paducah always pegs their F-4's at 210 mph, all the F-4's in recent history anyway. 2002 Carter County, MO. F-4 and the 2003 Massac County F-4 were both pegged at 210 mph. The Massac County tornado supposedly did damage approaching F-5 status. The damage on Buckner Ridge Rd in Madisonville was also high-end F-4, IMO. Check out this article and photo: http://www.kentucky.com/mld/heraldleader/n...ws/13188391.htm
 
Heres the latest dily-yo on Hopkins Co. from WFO PAH.


PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE PADUCAH KY
523 PM CDT THU NOV 17 2005

...PRELIMINARY DAMAGE SURVEY RESULTS FOR HOPKINS COUNTY KENTUCKY...

THE FOLLOWING IS A PRELIMINARY DAMAGE ASSESSMENT FOR THE DAMAGE THAT
OCCURRED OVER THE CENTRAL AND EASTERN SECTIONS OF HOPKINS COUNTY
KENTUCKY ON NOVEMBER 15 2005.

* EVENT DATE: TUESDAY NOVEMBER 15 2005

* EVENT TYPE: F4 TORNADO

* EVENT LOCATION: 1.5 MILES SOUTHWEST OF EARLINGTON TO 7 MILES EAST
OF HANSON.

* PEAK WIND: 210 MPH

* AVERAGE PATH WIDTH: 525 YARDS (APPROXIMATELY 1/3 MILE). TORNADO
WAS CLOSE TO A HALF MILE WIDE IN PLACES.

* PATH LENGTH: 15 MILES

* INJURIES: 27

* FATALITIES: NONE

* DISCUSSION/DAMAGE: THE TORNADO TOUCHED DOWN 1.5 MILES SOUTHWEST OF
EARLINGTON AND LIFTED APPROXIMATELY 7 MILES EAST OF HANSON NEAR
THE HOPKINS/MCLEAN COUNTY BORDER. PEAK WIND SPEED WAS
REACHED IN THE HIGHLAND PARK ROAD AREA OF EARLINGTON. DAMAGE
INDICATIONS AS WELL AS EYEWITNESS ACCOUNTS INDICATE THE OCCURRANCE
OF MULTIPLE VORTICES NEAR EARLINGTON. DAMAGE RESULTS ARE AS
FOLLOWS: 303 BUILDINGS/HOMES RECEIVED MINOR DAMAGE...67 RECEIVED
MAJOR DAMAGE...AND 151 WERE DESTROYED
 
Originally posted by Kevin Askew
Very could well have been an F-5 if the foreward speeds were reduced in this cell?

It's not an F5 if there was no F5 damage found. Remember, the Fujita scale is based only on damage - nothing else. That simply means even if the tornado had a measured 500MPH winds - if it was over a wheat field, it wouldn't be rated more than F0/F1 at best due to lack of damage.
 
Yeah I understand that. It did appear F-3-F4 damage was present. Im saying that the fast foreward speeds may have contributed to the storms/tornadoes intensity. Meaning that if the storm itself had a 30 mph foreward NE speed as apposed to 50-60 mph, it might have been able to produce a more intense mesocyclone/tornado. The fast speeds, may have been responsible for shearing apart a more intense circulation. Just a theory I have discussed with a few chasers. I seen as well as Glenn Schubert, a very rapid rotating wall cloud ramp up & then become ragged then do over again before breifly touching after we lost it before Galatia IL. Should have tornadoed in my opinion, but did not. Plus might have contributed to funnels not touching down, as apposed to a slower foreward speed, touching down, being a more intense meso. In other words if the mean storm motion of the LEWP's- Sups was reduced to say 20-30 knts, It could have REALLY been alot worse.
Kevin
 
Sometimes, storm motion can actually enhance windspeed. Forward speed has a lot to do with damaging straight-line wind potential, and can increase tornado windspeed as well. To the right side of the path (in a cyclonic tornado) where the winds are blowing toward the direction of movement, a high forward speed can increase the windspeed on that side.
 
Paducah NWS has released their preliminary report on the Marshall County tornado: http://www.crh.noaa.gov/product.php?site=P...NS&issuedby=PAH They also have some more photos of the Madisonville damage here: http://www.crh.noaa.gov/crnews/display_sto...id=324&source=0 It has been quite a while since Kentucky has had an F-4 tornado; the last one was May 28, 1996, in Jefferson, Bullitt, and Spencer counties just south of Louisville. That F-4 caused quite a bit of destruction, with over 1,000 homes damaged or destroyed and $100 million in damage. Even with all the damage, that was just a minimal F-4; the majority of the damage was F-2 and F-3, with the F-4 rating just based on one leveled home. The F-4 before that was on November 22, 1992, in Gallatin County. You have to go all the way back to the Super-Outbreak to see more KY F-4's. They are quite rare in KY, especially compared with some surrounding states like Indiana, Illinois, and even Tennessee.
 
Originally posted by Kevin Askew
Yeah I understand that. It did appear F-3-F4 damage was present. Im saying that the fast foreward speeds may have contributed to the storms/tornadoes intensity. Meaning that if the storm itself had a 30 mph foreward NE speed as apposed to 50-60 mph, it might have been able to produce a more intense mesocyclone/tornado. The fast speeds, may have been responsible for shearing apart a more intense circulation. Just a theory I have discussed with a few chasers. I seen as well as Glenn Schubert, a very rapid rotating wall cloud ramp up & then become ragged then do over again before breifly touching after we lost it before Galatia IL. Should have tornadoed in my opinion, but did not. Plus might have contributed to funnels not touching down, as apposed to a slower foreward speed, touching down, being a more intense meso. In other words if the mean storm motion of the LEWP's- Sups was reduced to say 20-30 knts, It could have REALLY been alot worse.
Kevin

As Andy mentions forward speed in the right front quadrant assuming cyclonic rotation can enhance damage. Alternatively a slower moving tornado has more time to inflict damage. Some surmize that the Jarrell F5 only did F5 damage because it moved so slowly and just shredded everything with such a large rotation and so much time over target.
 
Back
Top