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4/19/04 NOW: W TX/ SE NM / W OK

Kevin Scharfenberg

A thunderstorm has developed over southern Armstrong County, Texas, in the Palo Duro Canyon. A tornado watch has been issued for the panhandles down into SW TX and SE NM.
 
Looks like the storm moving into western Donley County is already approaching severe limits. We'll see if it can turn right and stay in the juicy air.
 
Storms really going up on the dryline in E NM right now. Very nice.
 
Looks like some nice storms developing...That was good forecasting Kevin S., I was skeptical of storms up until early this morning, but you called it yesterday afternoon.

Robert
 
Wow. That left-moving supercell currently just south of Clovis that split from the original northern cell along the dryline, has really developed a nice anticyclonic hook in the last several frames. Check it out!
 
Originally posted by Dan Dawson
Wow. That left-moving supercell currently just south of Clovis that split from the original northern cell along the dryline, has really developed a nice anticyclonic hook in the last several frames. Check it out!
[Broken External Image]:http://www.tornadocentral.com/now/anticyclonichook.jpg

Unfortunatley, none of the velocity products are much help. I cannot seem to find signs of rotation in any of the elevation angles on SRM nor Radial. If only I had things set up to view level II in real-time... oh well.


That cell southwest of LBB is very nice looking! There are some aliasing issue from LBB velocity images, but the MAF radar shows the meso very nicely! On the non-problematic scans, the LBB shows a very nice meso too!
 
Looks like some better moisture is moving into the area of the LBB storms. LCL's according to SPC Mesoanalysis page are lowering to around 800-900 mb, so maybe the tornado potential for these cells will increase.
 
Satellite imagery shows something interesting about these storms (I think, at least): all are embedded within the cirrus plume stretching northeastward from the Gulf of California - with the exception of the (once) intense supercell just south of Lubbock, which has managed to stay just east of the leading edge of the cloud shield.

It might be a good illustration of the sort of effect cirrus has on instability. Or maybe there's something else at play. Either way, it's something interesting to consider from 270 miles away.
 
Originally posted by Jeff Lawson
Satellite imagery shows something interesting about these storms (I think, at least): all are embedded within the cirrus plume stretching northeastward from the Gulf of California - with the exception of the (once) intense supercell just south of Lubbock, which has managed to stay just east of the leading edge of the cloud shield.

It might be a good illustration of the sort of effect cirrus has on instability. Or maybe there's something else at play. Either way, it's something interesting to consider from 270 miles away.

Quite possible... It looks like that cell that was southwest of LBB has become a victim of capping. From the SPC mesoanalysis page, the cell is approaching an increasingly capped environment, as CINH is >150 near and to the east of it... Thus the decrease in intensity. I think the same may be the cause of death for other cells, especially as heating wanes as the sun sets...
 
David Drummond has just reported in with a wedge tornado on the ground just west of Perryton TX

More information to follow.
 
Thanks Robert. I'm not too surprised by the baseball hail and tornado near Perryton. That storm has exhibited a deep mesocyclone and good reflectivity structure on radar for almost an hour. I was a little more surprised about the supercells that developed along the TX/NM border, but those were more driven by daytime heating.
 
Channel 9 in OKC just showed a still shot of a large wedge tornado north of Pampa. I'm assuming this is the same one as reported earlier...

Rick
 
Originally posted by Rick Smith
Channel 9 in OKC just showed a still shot of a large wedge tornado north of Pampa. I'm assuming this is the same one as reported earlier...

Rick


I dunno...I think Gary England may have been mistaken witrh that comment - Pampa and Perryton are nowhere close to each other. The video looked to be right around dusk, so it corresponds to the 8:45pm report time. I saw moving video - this thing was a beast.

You can tell I went to work today. maybe since I'm chasing tomorrow, we can get another wedge with marginal ingredients.
 
You're probably right, but I guess it depends on how far N of Pampa the video was shot. There's literally nothing between the two towns.

Gary just showed the video again - it was definitely shot before dark.
 
Originally posted by Rick Smith
You're probably right, but I guess it depends on how far N of Pampa the video was shot. There's literally nothing between the two towns.

Gary just showed the video again - it was definitely shot before dark.

Nice to see you on the board, Rick!

I didn't think AMA issue any other torn warnings besides the one immediately associated with the "Perryton" tornado...? Granted, could have occurred while not in a tornado warning, but something of that size would make me think it was quite evident on radar. Not always the case, but usually larger tornadoes are quite a bit easier to "see"...
 
Wel, I was right and wrong.......the 2% was extended further south to include a small piece of NE Texas, but the 5% wasn't dropped. In fact, it was increased to include most of eastern OK. I'm guessing SPC also like the CAPE forecast per 21Z RUC. This outlook is much more positive than I expected, given the fact that the RUC has SSW winds across the entire region at 21Z.

Anyway, be back later with my take on the day after some new runs update.
 
April 19th 2004 - total miles: 780, 13 hrs total

This was the first time out with my new wxworx system and I wanted an interesting chase
to try things out on. SPC had a 5% risk of T's for the OK/TX panhandles.
The wxworx system is something I've waited for for years! My GPS lost it's satellite signal
a few times but otherwise it performed great. It really makes a big difference being able
to see what's developing ahead of you ( and behind you ) as you drive to your target location.
Departed Lafayette, CO at noon, headed east on I-70 and then south on HW287 through Lamar, CO.
Drove past a very impressive wind farm near Springfield, CO.
Continued south and crossed into the OK panhandle at approx. 5:00pm. A line of storms
were in progress in the NE corner of the TX panhandle with a few T-storm warnings.
Crossed into TX around 6:00pm and decided to let the one cell to my SW come to me.
Passed by a coal train in jumbles next to the highway. Looks like it was blown off the tracks
weeks ago. Possibly an earlier tornado or straight line winds?
The large cluster of storms was no to my east with the single cell moving my way at 25 mph.
This one single cell was warned on while it was still in NM and seemed to be part of a line that
had it's southern most cell with a tornado warning on it as it crossed into TX. Unfortunately for
me it was too far south down by Lubock, TX. I gave up on the day in Hartley county, TX around
7:00pm where I got some beautiful sunset shots. Storms continued much of the evening in the
OK panhandle and lit up my rear view mirror for the drive home. Got a nice pic at sunset: http://www.geocities.com/stormchaserco/20040419.html
 
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