30-sec GOES Updates

Any ETA as to when this will be operational "out of storage"? Or do we have to wait for a GOES-11 or GOES-12 to fail first?
 
It'll wait for one currently operating to break... Even so, NWS has yet to turn on the switch for the technology to be able to use this mode often. NOAAPORT can be incredibly fast, but for some reason they are keeping it on a very limited bandwidth so this would fill the stream too much.
 
This is really amazing to see everything develop with such resolution. Was it just me or did it seem like the clouds were inverted, or concave rather? It's probably just my eyes playing tricks on me.
 
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Thanks for this post!

I remember reading about how Dr. Friday was absolutely thrilled with the GOES satellite imagery available in the mid 90s or so. He mentioned how one could see the anvil shadows clearly, the boiling from the cumulus masses etc.. Some day I might remember where I read that.

Anyway, once this generation of satellites is online full-time, they are going to provide some outstanding imagery, the greatest ever!
 
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The one big benefit of such temporal resolution is that you could use it to calculate vertical growth rate and overlay it onto NEXRAD imagery. This way, you could quite possible tell where rapid thunderstorm (and potentially severe thunderstorm) growth is likely... On the other hand, it would also help show which storms are currently collapsing, so it works either way.

Add that onto the fact that you could see OFB's in real-time, the movement and growth of individual cumulus clouds, etc..

This could also help out areas that have poor 88D coverage - hopefully the spatial resolution of the IR channel will be upped to 1km, and the VIS channel upped even higher... That's probably not going to happen with GOES-13, but it will most likely be included in a future satellite.

Andrew; I think it's eye trickery... I think you're seeing the shadow of the "anvil" on the W/NW side of the surrounding cloud tops.
 
This is really amazing to see everything develop with such resolution. Was it just me or did it seem like the clouds were inverted, or concave rather? It's probably just my eyes playing tricks on me.

It was a little confusing to watch. I think we are just so used to multi-hour loops with 15-30 minute resolution.

I can't wait to be watching that kind of detail for weather events around the country. Interaction with mountains, fog growth/dissapation, the list goes on.
 
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