3/17: FCST: Wednesday in TX, LA and AR

ETA bringing stronger SBCAPE owed to decent low-level temperatures and moisture (yielding more than 2000j/kg in some spots). Anybody chasing?

Discuss:
 
chase?!?

I dunno, I might, from the look of it there may be a few supercells in NE texas tomorrow. I like the forecast highs and dp's I think the ETA is understating dp's at the moment but GFS is forecasting mid 60's dp. Also with a LLJ and ok shear added to CAPE of >1500 could be nice. That is if the warm front travels north enough b/c favorable winds look to be confined to small area.

I will wait for the 00z update and make up my mind. What do you all think?
 
Chasing Wednesday

Do you think trough will hold out long? It sure seems temps are rather too cool and CAPE values are not looking too good or at least so far maybe find out tomorrow 12z. http://www.spc.noaa.gov/compmap/ Hmm CAPE/CAP , temps and dps though I bet are a problem for tomorrow. Well, I hope at least we get a good lightning show out of it at least in the evening, I want to be able to practice using my new digital camera's over exposure settings. It Sure is cool out now; well I wish best of luck to day time heating and vertical wind shear. :p
 
My only major concern is whether initiation will occur. If the shortwave is stronger, or even moves a little faster, I'm probably heading out. Of course, I'm not sure what I'd tell my boss since I'm scheduled....

Happy Chasing everyone,

Jim
 
Come on Jim... you've got to have about 500 excuses to pick from ;) Just tell him you gotta study for that partial differential equations test next week. :lol:

Aaron
 
As of 10:43AM, the theta-e ridge has Td's above 60 just S of the risk area, though with light backing winds on the order of 5 to 10 knots. There is abundant insolation, and the RUC says sfc temps should be ~80.

However, that is a lot of dew depression, and I'm wondering if any storms that can initiate can get rooted.

The biggest problem may be the 700 temps, at 4-6C. That's kinda high for St Patrick's Day, and the synoptic orientation of the upper level system precludes cold air advection in the mid-levels. Plus, 850RH is only about 50-60%, so there's not much help with latent heat there, either. Those two parameters tell me that that's the reason the LI's are only progged at about -4 for 00Z. With such weak instability, UVV's will be low.

I'll guess either cap bust or some (somewhat) high-based and low-topped junk for tonight.

Bob
 
You're right Aaron, what was I thinking! I'll tell my boss I'm studying on Saint Patrick's Day! I'm sure that will fly...LOL

I've looked at the data. Basically, there's probably around a 20% chance initiation will occur. The models are showing the vort max a little stronger, and a little further north. This, plus dryline convergence, along with moisture convergence near the low level moisture ridge/tonge could potential provide enough forcing withe surface temps in the lower 80's. I'm betting against it, but there's still a chance. Man I'm gonna be pissed if something goes up, 'cause it will be a freakin sweet looking supercell!

Happy Saint Patrick's Day!

Jim
 
Given a look at satellite trends and a quick modification of soundings, I wouldn't be too surprised to see a good storm go up in the area between Paris, TX and Ada, OK in the next few hours. Still not a very high probability, but that's the area I'm watching.
 
Man.... just watching the status of the Cu field over Norman was a good reminder of how much I love meteorology. With the sun beating down (over 80 out now!) and the Cu slowly getting bigger, it really gets me pumped for chase season.


Aaron
 
Severe thunderstorm watch!!!

So much for high based storms. That convection is surfaced based, people. There is even a thunderstorm watch for the area. Radar looks like severe multicell storms. Cu field go boom! :lol:
 
I'm betting against it, but there's still a chance. Man I'm gonna be pissed if something goes up, 'cause it will be a freakin sweet looking supercell!

Happy Saint Patrick's Day!

Jim


Well, it must be luck'o'the Irish, because those cells have V-notches on them. They probably are some sweet-lookin supercells. Too bad no tornadoes.

Happy St. Patricks Day!

Dave
 
sorry to ask but what is a V notch? On the ground, would you be viewing a clear slot?
 
sorry to ask but what is a V notch? On the ground, would you be viewing a clear slot?

I hope I have my terminology right. Maybe I'm calling it the wrong thing?
the V-notch is what you see on a Nexrad image on the NE or E corner of a supercell. I think it is also known as a "flying eagle" Also, that above radar image looks kind of old. Here's a newer one.


http://www.srh.noaa.gov/radar/latest/DS.p1...0/si.ksrx.shtml

Note the concave shapes in the echoes ahead of the precip cores.
 
Cheers guys. Have to say that last storm has pretty good radial velocity signatures on it and an apparent TVS, nothing showing to interupt inflow so this could have a chance of a tornado?
 
V-notch is due to the updraft splitting the upper level flow. Flying or "screaming" eagle typically refers to a full bodied supercell on radar with a hook echo (on base reflectivity).

Aaron
 
Awesome hook echo currently in NE Oklahoma...wouldn't doubt a tornado or two could form as LCLs lower and the low level jet increases. Just amazing!

Gabe
 
Spc finally had the MD out at about 6:16 CST, and get this, they were not even expecting to issue a weather watch. They just now are showing it.

And let me add, Nice pic! :D
 
There are now 5 confirmed mesos. My Swift WX is showing a nice j hook from cell ID A1. Good luck for those chasing and get a twister for me. :lol:
 
even if there are no tornadoes there would surely be a gustnado or two looking at RV - its a bit messy there but certainly possible. Thanks for the info on flying eagles too :D Any further word from those spotters?
 
Back
Top