What is the current record for wind speed??

With the strength of Katrina increasing constantly, I was wondering what the record wind speed of a hurricane is up tuntil now.
 
I'd like to be the first to report that the all time record is 231 mph on Mount Washington in New Hampshire, in what was an average storm.

For hurricanes I'm not sure. The 1938 hurricane that hit New England has a 190 gust at the Blue Hill Observatory in Massachusetts. The winds recorded by airplanes and extrapolated from dropsondes have been higher.
 
For a Hurricane out at sea Gilberts recording with 888mb was associated with 160kts at 700mb which Katrina exceeded early today.
 
Originally posted by B Ozanne
I'd like to be the first to report that the all time record is 231 mph on Mount Washington in New Hampshire, in what was an average storm.

For hurricanes I'm not sure. The 1938 hurricane that hit New England has a 190 gust at the Blue Hill Observatory in Massachusetts. The winds recorded by airplanes and extrapolated from dropsondes have been higher.

Can those count as 10m observations?
 
Mount Washington and Blue Hill were both 10m observations. 10 meters above their respective observation site.
 
Originally posted by Bernard Hulshof
What about the Labor Day hurricane of 1935? I believe the average wind speed was about 200 mph, or was this just an estimate?

Just like with F-scale ratings pre 1980, I'm suspsicious of high-end meteoorlogical obs in the early 1900s. I imagine it was an "estimated max" windspeed, but remember the old 1960s news stories about tornadoes and how they thought max winds in tornadoes may reach 500-600mph?
 
On another note, what is considered "Landfall" Is it when the entire hurricane is over land or when the eye is over land?
 
Usually "landfall" occurs when the center of the eye finally crosses the coast. Of course, the most intense conditions are felt near the eyewall.
 
Originally posted by Jeff Snyder
Just like with F-scale ratings pre 1980, I'm suspsicious of high-end meteoorlogical obs in the early 1900s. I imagine it was an \"estimated max\" windspeed, but remember the old 1960s news stories about tornadoes and how they thought max winds in tornadoes may reach 500-600mph?
Yes, I go along with you here. Of course, no anemometer will measure a 200 mph windspeed.
Perhaps the highest winds with a hurricane are the 190 mph sustained winds measured with supertyphoon Tip (monster storm over the Pacific in 1979; 1,350 miles in diameter, infrared temperature of eye wall -135°F).
 
I don't know, and I don't know if this was posted, but a 233 kt gust was reported by a dropsonde at 866 mb earlier today. Not confirmed BTW.
 
I saw that gust report too. Keep in mind reduction to surface probably is equivelant to a 180-190 knots. As a gust. Not really unexpected with 150 knot sustained winds.
 
The Moore, OK tornado from 1999:)

Seriously, I don't know what the wind speed record is for an Atlantic Basin tropical system. I can't imagine it is a great deal higher than that which the current Katrina is producing.

Pat
 
The Moore, OK tornado from 1999:)

Seriously, I don't know what the wind speed record is for an Atlantic Basin tropical system. I can't imagine it is a great deal higher than that which the current Katrina is producing.

Pat

If I remember the winds in that tornado was clocked by a DOW at over 300mph???
 
Re: ..

If I remember the winds in that tornado was clocked by a DOW at over 300mph???

318 mph

This has been readjusted to account for some uncertainty... Search through the ST archives to find the discussion we had with Dr. Wurman earlier this spring. It was like 302 +/- 15 mph. Back on topic...
 
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