Too Much Hype?

Did the media over hype Katrina?

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I say no, just because of the safety factor for those living there. As it is, many did not evacuate or are now heading home. I think if this had not weakened so much over the last 24 hours, there would not be much of NO left today
 
I don't think anything was overhyped on this; the storm itself has proven to be quite strong and damaging; luckily New Orleans managed to once again avoid the full brunt. Better for people to be prepared and take precautions rather than the alternative...

We still a few hours to go though.. lots of damage over Biloxi way and inland to consider.
 
Absolutely not. All indication were that New Orleans faced a very real POSSIBILITY of catastrophic damage. Hurricanes are NEVER entirely forecastable. The storm took a relatively huge hit overnight (just look at the IR loop) which dropped winds from Cat 5 to probably more like Cat 3. A track only 30 miles to the west would have brought the eyewall across downtown New Orleans, and I seriously think we'd definately be looking at a different scenario. Unfortunately, there is NO way to forecast at 15-20 mile resolution 24-48 hours out. The track wasn't too surprising, but the relatively quick drop in intensity (the central pressure rose 20mb in 12 hrs) surprise me (and most I'd think).

The main problem here is that a "catastrophe" was anticipated, and it largely busted (FOR NEW ORLEANS). Yes, there's likely some signficant damage in New Orleans, but absolutely nothing like what was anticipated. This situation seemed to be similar to digital signals -- either a 1 or a 0. Things either were going to be "pretty bad" (levees hold, etc) or catastrohpic (levees break, massive flooding and loss of life). Again, certainly can't blaim the forecasters, since the wobble was within the noise level (in the words of an NHC forecaster last night). However, you absolutely cannot bust a "doomsday" forecast. Again, the NHC has been saying "POSSIBLE CATASTROPHE" for a while, but the media has made it seem like a catastrophy was a guarantee. FAR is critical for high-end events... People who didn't get out of the way for a cat 4-5 forecast certainly won't get out next time... There was already a mentality of "these things always weaken or move", and this certainly doesn't again. I was reiterate a third time -- this is not a comment on the forecasters. The forecast was largely a huge success since they've hit on a hit east of New Orleans for a couple of days.

If small parts of the roof of the Superdome were removed with 80-100mph winds this morning, what in the world would have happened in 175-200mph. I can't imagine that structure would have held up to that type of wind. Yes, only very small parts of the roof lining were removed, but a double in wind speed essentially yields a 4-fold increase in wind energy.
 
Absolutely not.

Seems to me that 20 miles made the difference between some nasty damage and real catastrophe. If the storm hadn't taken that tiny jog to the east as it made landfall, much of NO would probably be under water right now. Better safe than sorry. If ever a situation deserved hype, this was it, IMO.

Pretty much the strongest language was coming out of the emergency managers and the municipal government. The media was just reporting what they were saying. Oh, and let us not forget that unbelievable NWS statement last night. That document was practically predicting the Rapture!
 
Now if the poll was asking whether The Weather Channel and some of the other channels had too much hype, then....well, yes. When a field reporter is saying that sustained winds are really blowing furiously, somewhere around 30mph (?@!?!), that doesn't impress me. 30 MPH...so what. It does that all winter in Albany. And when a field reporter is talking, stumbling and losing their balance...and then a citizen walks behind them pretty casually without any problem...it doesn't impress me. It tells me they are trying to sensationalize the story. Having been a TV Met. for 7 years, I know what the TV biz is all about. And my conclusion can be summarized as such: "Save the drama for your mama and just tell us and show us the facts". Unfortunately, some of the veteran Met's are guilty of this too.
 
Now if the poll was asking whether The Weather Channel and some of the other channels had too much hype, then....well, yes. When a field reporter is saying that sustained winds are really blowing furiously, somewhere around 30mph (?@!?!), that doesn't impress me. 30 MPH...so what. It does that all winter in Albany. And when a field reporter is talking, stumbling and losing their balance...and then a citizen walks behind them pretty casually without any problem...it doesn't impress me. It tells me they are trying to sensationalize the story. Having been a TV Met. for 7 years, I know what the TV biz is all about. And my conclusion can be summarized as such: "Save the drama for your mama and just tell us and show us the facts". Unfortunately, some of the veteran Met's are guilty of this too.

Exactly, why I started the poll.
 
I voted no, BUT … I would like to separate the NWS & NHC for the mainstream media. Did they over hype … NO. They did their jobs, as they should. They gave warnings of very real possible scenarios. The people of SE LA are very lucking this morning. As for the Mainstream media YES, the headlines and lead-ins I saw on Fox last night were nothing short of scare mongering. “ Deadly Cat 5 Storm Kills 7 in Floridaâ€￾ The storm was barley Cat 1 when it went through FL 3 days before. These sort of headlines don’t do anything but try to hype.
 
If anything, I would say it appears that they UNDERhyped the threat to Mississippi and Alabama. But that doesn't translate to an OVERhype of the New Orleans threat.
 
Fair enough. I've been watching exclusively streaming coverage from the local NO stations (we don't get cable at our house so I don't watch TWC or Fox or CNN) and I think they have done a very good job of getting the facts out -- and the few field reports I caught were quite reasonable too.
 
My wife and I were watching CNN yesterday and a lady was giving the weather analysis of Katrina. She was stressing over and over how bad it could be. She was giving one last roundup of the situation and says, "Absolutely <insert CNN name here>, this is a very intense situation as there will be a hellheck of a lot of rain as was seen from when Katrina went through South Florida."

My wife whipped around and was like, "Did she just say a hell?" I nodded my head and we laughed about it.

The meteorologist was noticeably nervous and angry afterward.

Maybe they just need to get that crazy guy in from the Charlotte station to emphasize how bad things could be.
 
One TWC anchor/reporter was standing behind a backdrop of a casino in Biloxi, MS and as he went to commercial said, you see this casino behind me, it won't be there tomorrow. At least something to that effect. That is just irresponsible and I'd expect more professionalism from a Meteorologist.
 
My wife whipped around and was like, "Did she just say a hell?"
Sheppard Smith did the same thing on Fox. He said something about "a hell of a lot of rain" and the studio hosts got kind of big eyed for a second.

Of course, that wasn't near as good as the guy on the street who told Smith that it was, "NONE OF YOUR FU**IN' BUSINESS!!" on air. :lol:
 
My wife whipped around and was like, "Did she just say a hell?"
Sheppard Smith did the same thing on Fox. He said something about "a hell of a lot of rain" and the studio hosts got kind of big eyed for a second.

Of course, that wasn't near as good as the guy on the street who told Smith that it was, "NONE OF YOUR FU**IN' BUSINESS!!" on air. :lol:

Yeah, that was funny but also uncalled for. As for if it's over hyped, I'd say no. Most of the hype really didn't even happen until Saturday Morning. Once it went to 5, that's when the media started to go crazy. But anyway, how many storms are there they do major damage to a sports arena (see photo below, remember roof should be all white)?

capt.ladm11408291538.hurricane_katrina_ladm114.jpg
 
I don't think there was too much hype, but there was (and is) far too little attention to the danger and damage potential away from the track and inland. For example, the radar right now shows Hattiesburg on the point of getting cored as the massive storm pulls in its angular momentum. And the reports from the Mississippi coast are anything but reassuring.

It also isn't clear to me that NO won't fill up like a bathtub. If indeed major levees are breached, the flood won't happen instantaneously, but will be very bad nonetheless.
 
Anderson Cooper went way overboard. He was in BR near the Ms river brige screaming ove the really high winds (less thean 30mph gusts) and going crazy showing the surge from the Ms river??? I guess he was just trying to make a story, but why when there is so much more going on. Other than that it has been much better than Dennis. Dennis was nothing compared to K and was hyped up just as much if not more.
 
Before we blame the media - let's recall that the NWS in New Orleans said:

MOST OF THE AREA WILL BE UNINHABITABLE FOR WEEKS...PERHAPS LONGER. AT
LEAST ONE HALF OF WELL CONSTRUCTED HOMES WILL HAVE ROOF AND WALL
FAILURE.
ALL GABLED ROOFS WILL FAIL...LEAVING THOSE HOMES SEVERELY
DAMAGED OR DESTROYED.

THE MAJORITY OF INDUSTRIAL BUILDINGS WILL BECOME NON FUNCTIONAL.
PARTIAL TO COMPLETE WALL AND ROOF FAILURE IS EXPECTED. ALL WOOD
FRAMED LOW RISING APARTMENT BUILDINGS WILL BE DESTROYED.
CONCRETE
BLOCK LOW RISE APARTMENTS WILL SUSTAIN MAJOR DAMAGE...INCLUDING SOME
WALL AND ROOF FAILURE.

HIGH RISE OFFICE AND APARTMENT BUILDINGS WILL SWAY DANGEROUSLY...A
FEW TO THE POINT OF TOTAL COLLAPSE. ALL WINDOWS WILL BLOW OUT.

They didn't say it was the worse-case scenario - they said IT WOULD HAPPEN.
 
Remember Miami?

Miami thought they dodged a bullet too. They thought Andrew was over-hyped too. Then... they saw the path of the eye... Homestead.

This isn't over yet... soon we will witness the aftermath. It won't be pretty.
 
Before we blame the media - let's recall that the NWS in New Orleans said:....
They didn't say it was the worse-case scenario - they said IT WOULD HAPPEN.

We have yet to get much information east of N.O. Sounds like there was a Camille type storm surge in MS.
 
Come to think of it the Ms gulf coast and mobile area where not hyped near enough and New Orleans was looking at a natural disaster like this country has never seen so I don't think it was overhyped for the most part.
 
Before we blame the media - let's recall that the NWS in New Orleans

They didn't say it was the worse-case scenario - they said IT WOULD HAPPEN.

While I agree the language was particularly strong in that report, let's not forget that it's one persons words and our interpretation of what he/she meant.

I still think it's better to err on the side of caution rather than not warn at all about the potential. It's hard to win though.. no matter what they do the NWS is bound to be criticized by certain groups..
 
While I agree the language was particularly strong in that report, let's not forget that it's one persons words and our interpretation of what he/she meant.

I don't really agree with this... Forecasters issue products on behalf of the NWS organization. The product at hand was officially issued by NWSFO LIX, so it wasn't like it was a blog on that particular forecaster's website. I do think they should have denoted a little more uncertainty than they did. That said, there's a difference in what they did (in trying to protect lives) than some of the media folks who make a 40mph wind seem like 200mph winds.
 
While I agree the language was particularly strong in that report, let's not forget that it's one persons words and our interpretation of what he/she meant.

I don't really agree with this... Forecasters issue products on behalf of the NWS organization.

Agreed, but I notice that not eveyone uses the same "language" or style of writing in their report. Some forcasters seem to convey things a little better than others...
 
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