"Grey-Hound" chasing...A new era?

Hey, im moving to Denver, CO and due to budgetary concerns...I have been forced to ride back on a greyhound bus. However, as a dedicated chaser, i planned and timed the route to go through the possible severe weather area in MO, KS on March 3. Looking at the GFS as runs get more accurate, i still am tring to get the timing right to when the bus should go through the area when the storms are expected to form. Since tickets are good for 1 year, and stops are many...I was wondering about getting off at a stop and waiting for storms to enter the area. The runs dont look as promising as the earlier ones, but still, with an enhanced risk of storms. It is likely that somewhere... one those stops is going to get hit. Has anyone tried this before, and is there any advice one could offer as far as this is concerned? Im going from St. Loius all the way to Denver on I-70...
 
The likelyhood of any given severe storm impacting any one given location at any given time is extremely unlikely, which is why we chase storms rather than wait for them to come to us. Most likely your going to be disappointed with the results attempting this.
 
I think you'd have better luck at storm chase hitch hiking. While in KS my car broke down after getting it to the shop I was sitting there watching the storms getting warned on TV. Finally when I got my car back I was told the alternator was about to go too. However, since it would take a whole day for it to be repaired I told the mechanic I wouldn’t go far and be back in the morning with it. Not wanting to risk getting stuck in some storm cause my alternator went I jokingly decided to myself to find a storm chaser. Not long after at a pull over I found a chaser. After suggesting I could navigate he agreed and we were off. Didn't see any tornadoes but storm chase hitch hiking was sure a funny thing to attempt. I don't recommend people trying this, it just jokingly worked out.
 
Yeah, i know...I just figured you guys would think that that was pretty funny. I've heard of wild ways of catching a storm, but never of grey hound bus chasing/riding. The chances of that are extremely minute...but, hey...Theres always the chance! :) Thats why i chose that day, rather than the others...That, and to get the "super freindly" fares.
 
Hey, im moving to Denver, CO and due to budgetary concerns...I have been forced to ride back on a greyhound bus. However, as a dedicated chaser, i planned and timed the route to go through the possible severe weather area in MO, KS on March 3. Looking at the GFS as runs get more accurate, i still am tring to get the timing right to when the bus should go through the area when the storms are expected to form. Since tickets are good for 1 year, and stops are many...I was wondering about getting off at a stop and waiting for storms to enter the area. The runs dont look as promising as the earlier ones, but still, with an enhanced risk of storms. It is likely that somewhere... one those stops is going to get hit. Has anyone tried this before, and is there any advice one could offer as far as this is concerned? Im going from St. Loius all the way to Denver on I-70...

Heh, I remember a video from last season where someone caught a Greyhound driving right through a weak tornado.
 
As David said, storms usually will do everything they can to avoid you if you are stationary. But at least putting yourself in the general vicinity is better than nothing. You might at the very least get some nice distant Cb, anvil or mammatus.

Yeah, i know...I just figured you guys would think that that was pretty funny. I've heard of wild ways of catching a storm, but never of grey hound bus chasing/riding. The chances of that are extremely minute...but, hey...Theres always the chance! :) Thats why i chose that day, rather than the others...That, and to get the "super freindly" fares.

The weirdest way I ever chased was on foot. Back when I was in college and was without wheels, I was hiking one afternoon in rural WV and a storm suddenly appeared in the distance. I ran for two miles as fast as I could (nearly passing out from exhaustion) to get to a spot that had a clear enough view so I could get some lightning shots. Then, I took a 1-hour city bus ride into town to get the film developed. I can hear Jeff Foxworthy having a field day with that one.
 
I thought it was a pretty novel idea, bless you for trying. I wasn't quite sure if you were serious or joking or a little in between.

My brother, my father and I were joking this spring that we need to chase storms in an airplane. It would cut down on the long hours of driving and give you many more chances or getting to the right area. Forget the logistics of actually flying a small plane, landing at a municipal airport and renting a car though. Not to mention the poor flying conditions typically associated with severe weather.
 
Bicycle chase!

Don't feel so bad...

One of my chases back in 1985, before I was driving, was on my Schwinn "Le Tour" 12-speed bike (yes, a bicycle) that I "core-punched" an intense Florida thunderstorm with!

It was very different, I enjoyed the pelting rain and 50+ MPH wind gusts, and the crackling CG's all around me.

I admit it, this was not safe, especially from the lightning ... But what do you expect from me as I was only a 15 y/o "invincible" teenager at the time!

I have a log on these way - WAY back then too, check it out below...

http://www.sky-chaser.com/stlog.htm#SEA1984

You can also see that my very first "hurricane chase" was a coastal observation in Fire Island for hurricane Josephine back in 1984 at age 14 where I actually recorded the surf by venturing out into it using trash bags as a wet suit and a tape recorder wrapped in bags! I was only 14.

Take care,

Chris C - KG4PJN
 
It is pretty funny.

Y'know, you can't spell "bust" without...

Hah! that is very funny, and unfortunatly, it seems thats the case. The GFS, and ECMWF both show that the amount of shear that was supposed to be present, isnt really going to be present. Plus, in my opinion...It doesnt even look like there will be any non-severe action...But, things look better for Sunday...Might have to wait till then. But, yeah...Im sure if a strong MCS developed along I-70, i would have no chance but to encounter it...Thats kinda what i was betting on...That or the mid/upper levels of any supercells that develop ahead of it...This is just a chance to relieve the case of SDS that has set in in our dull, dreary pattern in Northern MS, and move to CO...Two birds with one stone.
 
What if the bus gets delayed?

Not all Greyhound drivers may want to "punch through" any MCS, they might just stop at a stop and wait it out (even though it may be 10-20 miles between you and the "next stop" - That will be just a torture.

Hope that does not happen!
 
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