was it a tornado? or just straight line winds? you decide!

I'd say tornado based on the fact there were light outbuildings between severe structural damage that were untouched. SL wind events tend to be thorough, not finicky.

Then again I thought Mulvane was an F4, so I could be wrong.
 
I would say tornado. The satellite dish on house appeared to me to be twisted. Plus the boards stuck though the rooftops seem like tornado damage Ive seen.
 
http://realclearwx.com/images/31050.jpg

Seems to be taking whatever that white stuff is and spreading it out onto one side of the house. Very little wraparound.

Also I'm not sure what the satellite dish would tell us, nor how downburst boards into roofs look any different that tornado boards?
 
It looks like to me, to be more of tornado damage. It's hard to tell I guess, since I am not there. But based on those photographs I would assume it was a tornado. The one house was completely un-touched, which makes me think this, but who knows.
 
For downburst winds, one house being untouched and another getting a roof removed is not at all uncommon. The problem is that without video evidence, many times low-end tornadoes will NEVER be able to be determined. Just too similar...
 
I agree regarding the spotty nature of straight line wind events. I remember one event in particular where a large, recently constructed barn was severely damaged...while the owner's house and surrounding vegetation, which were only several hundred yards away, suffered no ill effects.

This was a derecho event, so even they don't do damage to everything in their path.

Pat
 
One thing I did notice that was a little peculiar in the photos is the way the attic's cellulose insulation (at least I'm assuming that is what the white stuff is) was deposited. This pattern may only be the result of the way it chose to settle once ejected? But the way it stuck to the side of the house looks interesting :)

Like Rob said, it would be nice to have a video...not that it wasn't fun checking out all the damage photos!!

Pat
 
Well, I don't look at these things all the time but I'd say you need more information. The pictures are good, but they just don't have that one piece of evidence that answers the question.

An expert could probably look at those photos and decide, but I don't see it at this time.
 
Originally posted by rdale
For downburst winds, one house being untouched and another getting a roof removed is not at all uncommon. The problem is that without video evidence, many times low-end tornadoes will NEVER be able to be determined. Just too similar...

I don't get why it's policy to assume it's not a tornado if the evidence is inconclusive. Who decided that straight line winds get the automatic nod without overwhelming edvidence to the contrary?
 
Because of the odds. MUCH more damage comes from straight-line winds. MANY more thunderstorms have wind than tornadoes. So until proven otherwise, you have to go with downbursts...
 
straight line winds

Originally posted by Steven Williams
How narrow a damage trail could straight line winds do?
very good question. the terrain of the area would not support any sort of enhanced wind speeds. i am not sure you could have such a narrow straight line wind damage event... but who knows. im sure its happened before. what storm processes could have such narrow wind damage?-when terrain doesnt appear to be an issue?
 
Originally posted by Shane Adams
I don't get why it's policy to assume it's not a tornado if the evidence is inconclusive. Who decided that straight line winds get the automatic nod without overwhelming edvidence to the contrary?
Shane, it is accepted practice (although not always followed) to rate conservatively, and then look for evidence that it may have been worse. Tim Marshall says, "Sometimes the evidence is in what was not damaged" in reference to things like "sliders".

Slider: Home insecurly fastened to foundation and "slides off" in high wind. May be a "foundation swept clean", but it is not an F5.
 
It sure would be nice to see a photo of more than one side of that house with all the insulation stuck to it, though.

A plane ride over the area might also beter determine stright line or tornadic winds as well.


JH
 
Preliminary data from TUL indicates this was a tornado...F1, 1.5 mile path, 100yds wide. Information I had says a survey was done, but I don't know if that was done by TUL people or based on Brian's information.

Rob
 
Preliminary data from TUL indicates this was a tornado...F1, 1.5 mile path, 100yds wide. Information I had says a survey was done, but I don't know if that was done by TUL people or based on Brian's information.

Rob
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i havent seen anything come down from tulsa... do u have a link?
 
i havent seen anything come down from tulsa... do u have a link?
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Brian,

No official link as of yet...I heard it from a friend that works at NWS OUN, he passed along the info that someone from NWS TUL had surveyed the damage and it is a confirmed tornado.

Rob
 
I don't get why it's policy to assume it's not a tornado if the evidence is inconclusive. Who decided that straight line winds get the automatic nod without overwhelming edvidence to the contrary?
[/b]

Occam's razor.

Since straight line winds are a much more common occurance than tornadoes (even weak ones), in the absence of evidence clarifying, one would conclude straight line winds.
 
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