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Video Inside A Tornado - Who Shot First?

Now that it seems to be established that TIV has possibly intercepted and shot video from within a tornado, the question comes up 'Were they the first?". See other thread: http://www.stormtrack.org/forum/viewtopic.php?t=7516

TIV claims that no one has done this before - see: http://www.autoweek.com/article.cms?articleId=102748 first paragraph. We also know Steve Green with the Tornado Attack group is trying to do the same.

Is TIV really the first. I have heard from other chasers that over the years a number of chasers have actually been in the rotation of a tornado briefly, and some multiple times. Do any of these veteran chasers have dash cam footage of any of these events making them the first?

What about Tim Samaras? I heard that he had a probe planted in the path that took video. Is this true? While this may be video from a inside a tornado it still isn't the chaser shooting the picture while there so this probably disqualifies.

What about David Drummond? We all remember a couple years ago seeing David's exciting video clips online with Melissa where they enter the path of an apparent fairly weak (apparently) multi-vortex tornado. No doubt they are there and videotape the event. It is somewhat unclear as to if one of the vortices actually hits them or if they manage to dodge them, but it appears one briefly does. If so....doesn't that make David Drummond the first on record to shoot video from inside a tornado technically?

I think this needs to be answered because historically someone will get credit for the event. I'd think that along with the credit will come cash from interested parties and video production companies wanting to show the video over and over and promote it.

If someone other than TIV was the first, then I think it is a disservice to promote TIV as the first. This seems to me kind of like copyright infringement.

Anyway I think perhaps the chase community should be the first to make this decision, and any publicity to the contrary should probably be challenged. Otherwise it seems every year we will have a new person showing up on the scene wanting to do 'what no one has done before' - LOL and shoot video from inside a tornado.

Now perhaps TIV gets better footage and drives into a better, or more traditional looking tornado vortex, but in my opinion better does not mean first.

What are your opinions here?
 
Well they weren't the first vehicle to ever drive into a tornado. And it sounds like they weren't even the first to videotape doing so. What about the KS overpass footage? I think the only thing the TIV can claim is they were the first people to drive into a tornado on purpose in order to get footage.

-ScottO
 
Originally posted by Scott Olson
Well they weren't the first vehicle to ever drive into a tornado. And it sounds like they weren't even the first to videotape doing so. What about the KS overpass footage? I think the only thing the TIV can claim is they were the first people to drive into a tornado on purpose in order to get footage.

-ScottO

Hey Scott, that's right. I forgot all about the Kansas turnpike video. Perhaps that was the first, and there are those that believe (I think it was Tim Marshall) that they actually turned around, and did do it on purpose. At the same time some have stated they were only on the periphery of the rotation. Also the overpass blocked much of their view of the tornado. Still it may qualify IMO.

What do the rest of you think?
 
Originally posted by Scott Olson
Well they weren't the first vehicle to ever drive into a tornado. And it sounds like they weren't even the first to videotape doing so. What about the KS overpass footage? I think the only thing the TIV can claim is they were the first people to drive into a tornado on purpose in order to get footage.

-ScottO

Well, to my knowledge... The tornado did not pass directly OVER them, and they weren't actually inside the tornado.
 
personally I don't think we want to make a race out of 'who gets footage first'. Everyone agrees it's stupid to try and if you get footage and live you are insanely lucky, not a good chaser. We already push the envelope with safety and to make an issue out of being a mile from the vortex versus inside it is silly. That being said, footage from inside a 13000 lb projectile as it tumbles along the ground in 200mph winds might be worth quite a bit! :D
 
During June 2005, Jim Leonard may have been inside a tornadic circulation while chasing in Texas. The video is pretty amazing and scary. He did not intend to be in that area.

As far as video (without a chaser), Charles Edwards designed a probe that that was placed in front of a wedge tornado in May 1997 by Casey Crosbie. This was the 'Dillo-Cam.
My account of the 1997 event:
http://www.harkphoto.com/may251997.html


Bill Hark
 
Originally posted by Scott Bell
That being said, footage from inside a 13000 lb projectile as it tumbles along the ground in 200mph winds might be worth quite a bit! :D
How many guys are in that thing anyhow? Ideally, there would be three. That way we can hear:

"Oh sh!t!"

"Please, God!"


and the ever popular, "I love you, Mom!" all on the video right before they die.
 
Originally posted by Rob_Davis+--><div class='quotetop'>QUOTE(Rob_Davis)</div>
<!--QuoteBegin-Scott Bell
That being said, footage from inside a 13000 lb projectile as it tumbles along the ground in 200mph winds might be worth quite a bit! :D
How many guys are in that thing anyhow? Ideally, there would be three. That we we can hear:

"Oh sh!t!"

"Please, God!"


and the ever popular, "I love you, Mom!" all on the video right before they die.[/b]

You would need a 4th guy that yells "Who's F^(%!#& idea was this anyway???" :lol: :roll:
 
Originally posted by nickgrillo+--><div class='quotetop'>QUOTE(nickgrillo)</div>
<!--QuoteBegin-Scott Olson
Well they weren't the first vehicle to ever drive into a tornado. And it sounds like they weren't even the first to videotape doing so. What about the KS overpass footage? I think the only thing the TIV can claim is they were the first people to drive into a tornado on purpose in order to get footage.

-ScottO

Well, to my knowledge... The tornado did not pass directly OVER them, and they weren't actually inside the tornado.[/b]

Well, the same can probably can be said for the TIV. They may have only gotten in the circulation around the tornado and not truly in the vortex. I doubt one is able to distinguish well inside the circulation of a tornado and determine whether one is truly in the vortex or just getting blasted with debris. I don't think this is something that is going in the record books, more likely if truly achieved will be in the Darwin book.

-ScottO
 
Actually..

Referring to the question at hand, Charles Edwards was the first..he deployed the "Dillocam" into the Wellington, KS beast Memorial day weekend in 1997! I was there as well, deploying a seismic recorder. Check out www.tornadoproject.com.

Sean Casey DID get into the dissipating rope stage of the tornado of June 12th. We were there documenting this tornado. Unfortunately, the tornado lifted briefly over our probes. When we went back to recover our probes, the tornado moved back to the WEST, and by the time we got out of the way, we were in the outer circulation.

Tim Samaras
 
Tornado Flips Truck - In-situ Video

I do not know if this really "counts" here, but the picture below is the INSIDE of a strong F1 tornado crossing I-95 in South Florida back in March of 1998!

p030998b.jpg


This is from a video, looking south, and in the video you can see the spot in the street in front of me become rain-free (eye?) just before the truck tips over ... Popped the heck out of my ears too.

The video was seen many times on Inside Edition and RealTV back then.
 
The KS turnpike video involves a close encounter. That's what makes it so dangerous - people don't realize it was a near miss. As for David's 5/22/04 adventure, as I understand the story they did not drive into the tornado. They were stopped after observing a tornado when another one dropped basically on top of them. Either way, that was some scary video. The main sticking point with this is that tornadoes are not objects so much as phenomena. They do not have clearly defined boundaries. Do you have to be at the location of the peak winds? Radially inward from there? At the exact low pressure center? Inside the debris field?


Ben
 
Not to put a damper on the thread, but imho, I really don't think that anyone will agree on this until someone comes forth with clear photage of looking straight up the inside of a tube.

This brings up another couple good questions...how wide does the inside have to be to present a clear shot. Most tubes are going to have a bend in them...so some manipulation is going to be needed.

Ultimitely, I think the wider and closer to 90 degrees from the ground the tornado gets, will present a much better picture. If there's any bend in the tube, it will appear gray on the inside.

The best photage is going to come from more than one camera. One camera has to be for the money shot up into the tube and the other has to be some sort of perspective relative to the ground. Also, they are going to have to have a high framerate to get the best definition of the tube right?

Some thought trails that might spark more discussion...even if my thoughts are wrong.
 
That is an event I would just as soon forget. It has caused me far more big problems than it helped in income. I have already made all the money I care to off the event, even though I am STILL getting requests for the video. After the DVD is done, I would just as soon put that up and never have to look at THAT particular piece of video ever again. One of the VERY FEW times I ever really scared myself chasing.

While I was happy to have been able to help at Hallam, in retrospect, I wish I would have stayed home that day.
 
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