Using for the first time the 75-300 mm. Squall line.

  • Thread starter Pedro C. Fernández
  • Start date

Pedro C. Fernández

This is a squall line taking place over Aragon some minutes ago. A very well defined storms line! I am located further away of 100 kms from it but, with zoom lens. The first time I use it for taking photographs about clouds. The result is incredible to my eyes....!

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Let my know your thoughts, please ;)
 
Wow...these are absolutely spectacular. You said you were over 100 km away? Very impressive. What kind of camera and settings are you using?


Ben
 
Originally posted by Ben Cotton
Wow...these are absolutely spectacular. You said you were over 100 km away? Very impressive. What kind of camera and settings are you using?


Ben

Canon EOS 350D with the 75-300 mm (it has image stabilizer... incredibly good results with it :shock: :shock: Quite expensive but.......)

I can't wait for a tornadic supercell storm here :lol: (I'm dreamming....)
 
My location (look at the white square) and point of view. By the way, there are 150 kms between my location and Zaragoza. Squall line were over this city in the map:

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What's the topography like there? Any idea about the atmospheric conditions? I would imagine the relative humidity would have to be fairly low between you and the storm to have that good of visibility 150 km away.


Ben

edited immediately because he fixed the image problem already
 
WOW Great pics!

It is even more mouthdropping to me because I haven't seen any TCU since February and the amazing SoCal severe wx event (from Southern Californians' standards). :shock:. No kidding. Could use some of that here!
 
Great photos, but to my eyes they look a bit underexposed. When shooting skies(clouds), I often dial the meter up anywhere from half to 1.5 stops to account for most of the frame being "cloud".

Aaron
 
Thanks all for your comments!

I used polarized filter and I'm sure this is the reason because the photos can be a bit underexposed: I took them when the sun was going down. For some of them I used a bit more of contrast (sorry for my English; it's a bit difficult to me to talk about photography in English...)
 
Great Pics Pedro! I've learned one thing...never leave home without the canon..they are expensive but you have better results with their products in the long run.
 
Originally posted by Anthony Silver
Great Pics Pedro! I've learned one thing...never leave home without the canon..they are expensive but you have better results with their products in the long run.

Certainly yes :) !

Talking about the weather conditions yesterday: I wanted to hang on some maps (500 mb topography and surface isobars) to make a little explanation about it, but I was afraid of getting into trouble due to the copyrights.

In this way, there was a deep talweg with a close center at the 500 hPa level, just at the west of Iberia, close to it, and being adsorved by a greater low pressure region of high latitudes. There was a quite intense S jet over the area. Sky was quite clear despite of the sand coming from Africa.
 
Traditionally, the polarizer is used for daytime conditions... you'll find it won't help you too much in the evening when light has already been scattered substantially (at least in my use). Next time, try shooting a few shots with and without... let us know how they turn out! It isn't like it will cost you any more ;)

Aaron
 
Thanks, Aaron :wink:

Other reason I put the polarized filter on the lens is to keep it out of sand or dust. In this way I have to buy a protective filter (without effects on the photographs, only for keeping the lens out of sand or dust) because when I bought the camera, I was unaware of the existence of this kind of filters. So, you musn't clean the lens and there is no danger of scracth the lens.

Bye! :)
 
Thanks, Aaron :wink:

Other reason I put the polarized filter on the lens is to keep it out of sand or dust. In this way I have to buy a protective filter (without effects on the photographs, only for keeping the lens out of sand or dust) because when I bought the camera, I was unaware of the existence of this kind of filters. So, you musn't clean the lens and there is no danger of scracth the lens.

Bye! :)

You can protect your lens with a UV filter instead of a polarizer, unless this is what you mean. A polarizer won't add any F-stops, tho. In either case, a slight underexposure is almost always good for color.

Beautiful pix, BTW.
 
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