In-Motion High-Speed Satellite Internet is Here

I hope this hasn't been posted already. I thought it worth mentioning that finally this summer we'll be able to have satellite in-motion internet and not have to rely on cell phone providers. Best of all, it's low-profile so we should be able to mount it on an SUV without having to worry about a huge white dome. I've posted the product information and links below.

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Available Summer 2006

RaySat's SpeedRayâ„¢ 3000 offers vehicles on-the-move, high-speed Internet access and satellite TV using a low profile (5.7â€￾) roof mounted KU-band satellite antenna. The system provides vehicle passengers with an in-car hotspot, easy IP based network access plus live satellite TV.

The SpeedRayâ„¢ 3000 system consists of an outdoor antenna unit for satellite signal reception (data and TV), indoor antenna controller, satellite modem (for Internet access), WiFi router and a DBS satellite receiver (for live satellite TV). Integrated advanced sensors and a sophisticated tracking system provide access while the vehicle is in-motion or stationary. The SpeedRayâ„¢ 3000 antenna mounts securely to the cross bars of a vehicle roof rack or alternatively, RaySat manufacturers special brackets for RV and truck installations.

The SpeedRayâ„¢ 3000 is the world's first vehicle-based satellite antenna providing in-motion, high-speed Internet access to motorists, including emergency personnel, riding in cars, trucks, or motor homes. The new SpeedRayâ„¢ 3000 is based on an enclosed low profile, roof-mounted antenna that enables Internet access to laptops, PDAs, or other devices equipped with Wi-Fi wireless networking technology.

The innovative system provides high-speed Internet access that can be shared among users in the vehicle. In addition, the SpeedRayâ„¢ 3000 provides moving vehicles with strong reception of digital satellite TV and music channels. Since it communicates solely via satellite, the antenna can be used effectively in remote areas where cellular and land-line connections are not available.

Link: http://www.raysat.com/Shopping/CategoryInf...?CategoryID=191
Product PDF: http://www.raysat.com/webdata/Categories/1...ray%203000b.pdf
 
I wonder what the price of this will be... There are a couple other companies that have been making in-motion, high-speed (relatively) internet access for years, mainly serving the RV and long-haul semi-truck market. Of course, those have required several thousand dollars for equipment and installation, on top of hefty monthly fees. I'd get this if it could be... $200 equipment and $50/mo. LOL.
 
Originally posted by Jeff Snyder
I'd get this if it could be... $200 equipment and $50/mo. LOL.

You and everyone else here! I don't see it being cheap because it isn't something everyone will want to have.
Supply and demand.
 
Originally posted by Jeff Snyder
I wonder what the price of this will be... There are a couple other companies that have been making in-motion, high-speed (relatively) internet access for years, mainly serving the RV and long-haul semi-truck market. Of course, those have required several thousand dollars for equipment and installation, on top of hefty monthly fees. I'd get this if it could be... $200 equipment and $50/mo. LOL.

That would be a 7 with three zeroes. ;) Which isn't THAT bad considering you get a built-in WiFi hotspot and TV. Never-the-less, I don't think everyone at Stormtrack will be getting one.

I wasn't aware of any other high-speed satellites. I do know that some trucking and shipping companies use them for transmitting the truck's location but I'm pretty sure they only got dial-up speeds at best.

I'm still looking forward to its release so I can at least dream of getting one. :)
 
Well maybe not quite that bad .


http://www.cnet.com/4520-10602_1-5619060.html

RaySat

TalkBack: Add your opinion
The product: RaySat announced at CES that later in 2005, it will begin shipping a two-way satellite link that will let a moving vehicle connect to the Net. Like the TracVision and Winegard products, the RaySat antenna is a 5-inch-high, pancake-shaped, hybrid phased-array unit that's small enough to fit on top of a van or SUV but not on a car.

The company expects that service agreements will offer download speeds up to 4MB per second, with a maximum of 128Kbps upstream. There is a half-second of latency (round-trip time) with satellite communication. That's not a blocker for Web browsing or media streaming, but it would affect online gaming or VoIP use.

Audiovox will resell this product. Future satellite units will be smaller and may even be built into car roofs.

The price: $3,495 for the hardware; installation and service fees extra.

That might be doable considering what I am paying for my wireless data service. Depends on the monthly service charge?
 
Under $5k I would certainly consider it. I suspect the service prices will be similar to what the datastorm service price is right now.

Now to figure out where I can clear a 3x4 foot space on my roof! :lol:
 
I'm rather suprised no one has mentioned the hail threat to this thing.

I wonder how well it could stand up to those forces. EDIT: The promo video states that it "can stand up to the elements" and is "weather resistant".

Another thing - what about security? Is someone more inclined to rip it off the car and walk/run away with it?

How efficient is it under a storm?
 
Originally posted by Edward Ballou
I'm rather suprised no one has mentioned the hail threat to this thing.

I wonder how well it could stand up to those forces. EDIT: The promo video states that it "can stand up to the elements" and is "weather resistant".

Another thing - what about security? Is someone more inclined to rip it off the car and walk/run away with it?

How efficient is it under a storm?

Nice thick sheet of plexiglass mounted to some sort of a frame about it (frame would need to be larger than the antenna so as not to block the signal) might do the trick. I've shot DirecWay signals through glass successfully, I can't see it being any different with this.

As I understand, it's removable. Says it can mount to the roof rack rails and has TNC connectors, don't see why you couldn't remove it.
 
The more I think about it, some of the high tensile strength mesh plastic mounted to a frame above it might provide more of a "trampoline" for the hail.
 
I know it says it's only for vans, SUVs and RVs but I would have to figure out how to mount it on my escort. I can't imagine that it would be too hard. I've seen racks on escorts before.

You look at the dealer page? $300-500 per installation commission? Not too bad of an idea for a second job.
 
Yeah $5k is steep, but isn't really all that bad. You can use this thing to replace your home internet connection and tv service as well, so you can maybe justify a more expensive monthly fee.

Hmm. Maybe in 2 years when the price comes down I'll think about this!
 
I'm curious if the company can actually develop different types of purchase plans ... I wouldn't really utilize the satellite TV so much unless I was really bored on a chase (I typically bring DVD's and books ... stuff to do too ... keeping busy) ... so it would be nice if they would simply charge for the internet data stream alone ... that could bump down some of the cost aside from the equipment charges
 
Yeah I too would be worried about 'rain scatter' of the signal in the near storm environment. When you need it the most it might start cutting out and loosing bandwidth on the internet connection because of the signal being scattered by large rain shafts between you and the satellite.
 
Originally posted by Verne Carlson
Yeah I too would be worried about 'rain scatter' of the signal in the near storm environment. When you need it the most it might start cutting out and loosing bandwidth on the internet connection because of the signal being scattered by large rain shafts between you and the satellite.

I dunno.... I have used both DirecTV and a satphone, and I had very few problems with that with either one. The only time I had outages, they were when the most intense part of a storm was directly between me and the satellite (to the south), and usually only lasted a minute or so. That would put you north of, and near to, a core, and you have a problem or two if you're there anyway.

I wouldn't hesitate a second to purchase and use a sat system because of that.

Bob
 
Yeah I too would be worried about 'rain scatter' of the signal in the near storm environment. When you need it the most it might start cutting out and loosing bandwidth on the internet connection because of the signal being scattered by large rain shafts between you and the satellite.

I dunno.... I have used both DirecTV and a satphone, and I had very few problems with that with either one. The only time I had outages, they were when the most intense part of a storm was directly between me and the satellite (to the south), and usually only lasted a minute or so. That would put you north of, and near to, a core, and you have a problem or two if you're there anyway.

I wouldn't hesitate a second to purchase and use a sat system because of that.

Bob

Yeah, the actual satellite antenna is quite small but I still wouldn't expect a whole lot of problems. Adding to Bob said, by the time it goes out, I'd hope you'd already have a plan and could go without live radar data for a few minutes. For the most part, I think these newer models are designed with light rain in mind. Unless it's a complete downpour, I wouldn't expect many problems.
 
Seems to me, IMO, that after you have reached the, in or near storm environment, the need for internet data at that point has dramatically decreased, you are there.
 
Seems to me, IMO, that after you have reached the, in or near storm environment, the need for internet data at that point has dramatically decreased, you are there.

Not always the case. may times you have low clouds or reduced visibilty due to haze so being able to download a sat pic or a radar can make or break the chase. If you have a cluster of storms it is sometimes hard to detect which one has clear air or is gaining strenght while the others are weakening. Seen this many times and have been 30 miles from a tornado and not known it until it was too late. Even to pick up a warning from the NWS can help out in areas where NOAA radio coverage lacks.

WxWorks helps alot but being able to access the web and grab hi-res sat shots or last minute surface obs or an MD from the SPC can be invaluable.
 
Wow, I knew it only had to be a matter of time. It would be a ncie thing to have, butl ike people said, rain scatter could be a problem. I wonder just how much damage it would put in my wallet as well?
 
Andrew:

Well maybe not quite that bad .
http://www.cnet.com/4520-10602_1-5619060.html
RaySat
TalkBack: Add your opinion
The product: RaySat announced at CES that later in 2005, it will begin shipping a two-way satellite link that will let a moving vehicle connect to the Net. Like the TracVision and Winegard products, the RaySat antenna is a 5-inch-high, pancake-shaped, hybrid phased-array unit that's small enough to fit on top of a van or SUV but not on a car.
The company expects that service agreements will offer download speeds up to 4MB per second, with a maximum of 128Kbps upstream. There is a half-second of latency (round-trip time) with satellite communication. That's not a blocker for Web browsing or media streaming, but it would affect online gaming or VoIP use.
Audiovox will resell this product. Future satellite units will be smaller and may even be built into car roofs.
The price: $3,495 for the hardware; installation and service fees extra.
That might be doable considering what I am paying for my wireless data service. Depends on the monthly service charge?
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I dont know if any one has mentioned this, but the RaySat also acts as a DirectTV Dish too. I'm impressed in what it offers, but with the $3,000 to $4,000 its a little steep and out of the question for now. I've also heard, but not confermed for those like me who drive sedans this could actually be mounted under the trunk lid.
 
We'll I was checking the RaySat website to see if there were any updates on price and availability and I found a news story on there website about an award they won at the Las Vegas "Best of show innovations award". The article can be found here....

RaySat 3000


Here is the highlight of the article with respect to price and availability.....


Personal users also represent a sizable, and growing, potential market, since no wireless carrier can yet provide the combination of national coverage and the high speed of satellite communication. With the automotive video market now exceeding 10 million vehicles, some customers primarily interested in satellite TV reception will acquire the SpeedRay 3000 for its additional, incrementally affordable Internet capability.

Robnett said the SpeedRay 3000 is scheduled to start delivering in the fall of 2006 and will retail for around $6,995.00. Installation and subscriptions to TV and Internet service are additional.


I am not sure how affordable that is. I was considering it at $3000 but $7000 plus installation and service iis a little out of my price range.
 
$7k is definately a potential deal-breaker for me. I wonder why the $4k price was advertised initially. And if the thing is self-tracking and uses a WIFI interface, why would you need to pay someone for installation? Even so, the monthly fee is going to be the main concern. The initial equipment cost ($4k, not $7k) I could probably handle. Considering with this unit I could eliminate my home cable internet and WxWorx monthly fees and just keep the satellite internet for both home and mobile use. If it is around $100/month, that is doable for internet access, plus maybe another $30-$50 for TV although that isn't entirely neccessary. Any more than that and it will simply be a luxury then that I couldn't justify. $7k hardware certainly puts it in the luxury category though.

I'll be watching this closely. I'm sure in a couple of years either the price will come down or there will be other solutions/competitors appearing.

As for hail, if the day comes that I ever install this thing, I'm going to Home Depot and building a super heavy-duty hail sheild for it. Maybe something with a Mythbusters-style motor-driven actuator to quickly flip up and cover it. That's like buying a HD video camera and strapping it to your roof, it's got to have some protection.
 
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