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Dust Bowl era and Tornadoes

Does anyone have any stats on tornadoes during the dust bowl? Whether or not it led to an increase or decrease in tornadoes?
 
Well, according to this, and considering the duststorms began around 1931, peaked in 1937, and abated by 1940, I don't see much correlation. But it's really, really hard to interpret this... the Great Depression had a big impact on society and infrastructure, and probably influenced tornado reporting in some unmeasurable way. Not that any real reporting system was in place (especially in remote areas) -- it's best to squint when looking at those older tornado numbers and make them a bit fuzzy.

Tim
 
Originally posted by Tim Vasquez
Well, according to this, and considering the duststorms began around 1931, peaked in 1937, and abated by 1940, I don't see much correlation. But it's really, really hard to interpret this... the Great Depression had a big impact on society and infrastructure, and probably influenced tornado reporting in some unmeasurable way. Not that any real reporting system was in place (especially in remote areas) -- it's best to squint when looking at those older tornado numbers and make them a bit fuzzy.

Tim

That increase is probably due to the formation of SELS see:
http://webserv.chatsystems.com/~doswell/im...S_Tornadoes.JPG
 
All I know is that a few of the deadliest tornadoes in U.S. history occurred during the dust bowl......especially here in the southeast.

March 21, 1932...... deadliest tornado outbreak in Alabama history; 268 died there.....a total death toll over 330. Possibly a dozen violent tornadoes in AL/ MS/TN/GA

April 5-6, 1936.......vicious F5 tornado near Tupelo, MS killed 216 on Sunday evening. After other strong to violent twisters tore across northern Alabama and southern Tennessee during the night, a large breakfast time (8:30 a.m.) F4 struck Gainesville, Georgia killing 203 (by far the deadliest tornado in Georgia history). This outbreak occurred only four days after another killer outbreak on April 2 (F4's at Cordele, GA and Greensboro, NC; the Georgia tornado at 7:30 in the morning).
 
Just off the cuff, I'd say:

(1) The population density increased rapidly over the history of the U.S., making the risk worse with time.

(2) After WWII came a period of economic and scientific prosperity, which drastically reduced the risk. People lived in sturdier buildings, building codes were improved, warnings started to trickle out, and TV/radios were becoming widespread.

It seems to be pretty easy to make a case that the 1930s-1940s was caught in the middle, and might have been the most vulnerable period for tornado deaths.

Tim
 
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