Amateur Radio Frequency

146.520 is the national calling frequency and 146.550 is the unofficial chaser frequency. As far as I know, there's no chaser freq on 70cm but 432.100 is the calling frequency.


The BC
 
We used 146.550 this year and FRS for those in the group that are not hams. Jim Leonard lead our group on May 13th and we used FRS until we got split up. It was good having two hams in the group, I fell back due to large hail and we stayed in contact 15+ miles away on 50watts on 146.550 simplex.

As I watch chaser DVDs from this year I do notice more chasers using the Walkie Talkie function of their Nextels to keep in touch, thats a good way to keep those in their group in touch without giving out locations and conditions they might want to keep a secret, sometimes thats good. Since they use the Nextel network, they can be many, many miles from each other and keep in touch.

Mike Robinett
W4UAV
 
Is 146.55 popular around the country? Here in Oklahoma we have two main networks that cover just about the entire state that are linked to the NWS. Most of the more powerful repeaters are programmed so the NWS offices in Tulsa (TSA) and Norman (OUN) can remotely link them during severe weather and gives chasers/spotters a direct line to the NWS office for Western and Eastern Oklahoma. I don't know how many other states (if any, maybe TX?) have a system like this, but I know when I'm chasing in Oklahoma, I can usually hit one of them and have a direct line to NWS for reporting. Most city EOCs tune in as well for information from spotters. I wish Kansas had something like this...
 
Mike:
146.55 is a talk around simplex frequency. There are generally not many repeaters with an input freq that falls on or around 146.55 thus making it a good choice for use.
 
Originally posted by Mike Gauldin
Is 146.55 popular around the country? Here in Oklahoma we have two main networks that cover just about the entire state that are linked to the NWS. Most of the more powerful repeaters are programmed so the NWS offices in Tulsa (TSA) and Norman (OUN) can remotely link them during severe weather and gives chasers/spotters a direct line to the NWS office for Western and Eastern Oklahoma. I don't know how many other states (if any, maybe TX?) have a system like this, but I know when I'm chasing in Oklahoma, I can usually hit one of them and have a direct line to NWS for reporting. Most city EOCs tune in as well for information from spotters. I wish Kansas had something like this...

I know the NWS out of Wichita uses 146.820 and that tower is out of Hutchinson, Also there is a repeater out of Beaumont Ks (145.130 I think)which is east of Wichita that they use alot. Now, Sedgwick Co RACCES will use 146.940 but that repeater goes to them when bad weather hits the city. Now Mike Umscheid (a ST member) I do believe does work for the NWS out of Dodge City and he might now the loaction of the towers and the frequency they use in that area.
 
Originally posted by Steve Miller OK
146.55 is a talk around simplex frequency.

I knew that :p I was just wondering since it seems what you would normally hear on the .55 simplex takes place on the repeaters around OK. I wish some of the people would use simplex and not rag-chew on an active emergency net.
 
Here in SW OK the main frequencies used for storm spotters and reports are 147.045 (Cyril, OK), 147.255 (Grandfield, OK) and 147.715 (Granite, OK). All three repeaters are linked together and are also linked to NWS in Norman (WX5OUN). The three repeaters are owned and operated by S.W.I.R.A.
During severe weather the weathernet is active and the frequencies are for reporting confirmed reports only and not used as general chat frequencies
http://www.swiralink.com/repeaters.htm
 
At last reading, I believe that Dodge City and Garden City could link up in the event of severe weather. I think it is a 440/2m link.

Tim
 
Here's a link to the ARRL band plan: http://www.arrl.org/FandES/field/regulatio...andplan.html#2m

As you can see 146.52 is the National Simplex Calling Frequency, meaning that it should only be used to initiate contacts. 146.55 is also within one of the designated frequency ranges for Simplex communication, and has become popular with chasers over the years (although it's not exclusively reserved for chasers).

I always monitor both; however I also usually have a map with the various repeaters available for a given area (along with information on those that you shouldn't come up on during a weather situation).

Perhaps this is also a good time to plug the excellent "kBrews Storm Spotting Frequencies" website... anybody who caries a radio or scanner with them should have this site bookmarked. http://www.caps.ou.edu/~kbrews/spotfreq/index.html
 
I have long been a supporter and user of 146.55 as a common chaser talk-around freq on 2m but I can't say I have ever looked in to simplex on 70cm. Is there a common freq in the 70cm range for chase chatter?
 
Originally posted by Steve Miller OK
I have long been a supporter and user of 146.55 as a common chaser talk-around freq on 2m but I can't say I have ever looked in to simplex on 70cm. Is there a common freq in the 70cm range for chase chatter?

The only simplex banter I've ever heard on 70cm has been on 446.00, although the calling freq. is supposedly 432.10.

I generally only use 70cm for repeater work.
 
I've always thought chatting on 2 meters on the way to targets or after a chase is one of the most enjoyable sidelights of the experience. Of course it's cool to have car trips with just silence or some music, but during a multi-day (or multi-week) chase expedition, the radio can keep you sane. It's a cool way to catch up with friends and analyze the hell out of the wx setup---and with real-time sensible data! It's sort of like a rolling chat room with actual voices and a chase at the end.

146.550 gets crowded around isolated storms and it helps to have a few backup frequencies in case the qso's bog down. This seems to happen when seven to ten chasers share the frequency in close proximity---not all that often, but usually at a critical time. It's good when groups agree on alternate simplex channels to maintain their own discussions.

I've noticed chasers deliver their best comedy material on the radio. Several dash-mounted videotapes of mine contain hilarious bits or one-liners from other chasers that are somehow even funnier because it's over the air. I guess it's natural to use humor in tense situations. With the radio, you don't have to look like you're enjoying your own quip. You can deliver the one-liner and still keep the nervous look on your face.
 
Central Texas Wide Area Repeater with EchoLink to FWD

Originally posted by Mike Gauldin
I don't know how many other states (if any, maybe TX?) have a system like this, but I know when I'm chasing in Oklahoma, I can usually hit one of them and have a direct line to NWS for reporting. Most city EOCs tune in as well for information from spotters. I wish Kansas had something like this...

We have a very wide area repeater located at 1600 feet AGL near Eddy, Texas (South of Waco) with Echolink connectivity to the NWS in Fort Worth. The coverage area is roughly Hearne/College Station to San Saba and Hillsboro to Round Rock.

We also have a APRS digi located at the same level.

If the DFW area is not having problems, we usually have someone connected from FWD via EchoLink.

I am the trustee and with my ancient, night blind eyes quite often the net control and If I am not chasing, I have almost every weather/ham related program mentioned on this forum running on two computers and four monitors.

Try it out the next time you are passing through the area chasing dust devils... We have given up on anything wet...

The repeater frequency is 147.140, PL123
 
What about those of us who don't have an amateur radio license (yet)? Is there a common channel for CB radio?

Hmm, I haven't heard of chaser CB channel... I used to have a CB in my car, but got rid of it this past year since I never used it. I think the main neg for CB is range... You're stuck with 4-5W, which doesn't do much for range (vs. 50W on 2m with a 3-4dB antenna).
 
I still carry a CB in my truck to garner information from truckers who just came through a storm or get a smokey report :).. You would be surpised how much info you can get from the truckers about storm conditions.

On the other hand I dont think I have heard any chasers use the CB for communicating. I do know some have gone to the FRS style radios which have a much shorter range than a 2m but do not require a HAM license. I and my partners use them as backups or for when we are out of our vehicles but I have heard alot of car-car traffic on them also and since you can buy a set of 2 for about $50 it is a cheap alternative for those that arent HAM's (everybody should be. its easy and cheap).
 
The national calling frequency for UHF FM voice is 446.000....the 432 MHz freq everyone is listing is the SSB voice calling frequency.
 
This reminds me of something I meant to address in the chaser community back during the summer.

The convention in ham radio VHF simplex is that the simplex "channels" be spread out by .15 MHz to prevent interference. Hence, you get numbers like 146.52, (146.535), and 146.55 MHz.

Earlier this year, we had to change freqs off of one of these established simplex freqs due to other chasers using a non-standard freq closeby. While obviously not illegal, it would be beneficial to all hams to try to stick to the standards, especially near those beautiful isolated storms where the crowds get thick.
 
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