8/20/06 DISC: CO *rescued*

**rescued post**

Greg Stumpf


Joined: 29 Apr 2004
Posts: 421
Location: Norman, OK

Posted: Mon Aug 21, 2006 6:46 am Post subject: Re: 8/20/06 NOW: CO Mark Farnik wrote: Lest we forget the June 12, 1988 lanspout outbreak, one of which did F2 damage in an Aurora neighborhood.
The date was June 15, 1988, and there were 4 damaging non-supercell tornadoes, 2 in the city of Denver, one at the Rocky Mountain Arsenal, and one outside of Brighton. None in Aurora. I witnessed all four.
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Rich Dorfman



Joined: 11 Jun 2004
Posts: 16
Location: Oconomowoc, WI

Posted: Mon Aug 21, 2006 5:03 pm
Post subject: Yup, these look like landspouts to me. Channel 9 has video & pics, see:

http://www.9news.com/9slideshows/Tornadoes near Bennett - August 20, 2006/
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Scott Olson
Moderator

Joined: 17 Sep 2004
Posts: 1044
Location: Brookings, South Dakota

Posted: Mon Aug 21, 2006 5:16 pm
Post subject: Split from 'NOW' since event has passed.
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Rean Clover


Joined: 06 Mar 2006
Posts: 19
Location: Iowa

Posted: Mon Aug 21, 2006 7:38 pm Post subject: I don't understand the difference between a landspout and a tornado. Can someone tell me?


Rich Dorfman


Joined: 11 Jun 2004
Posts: 16
Location: Oconomowoc, WI

Posted: Mon Aug 21, 2006 10:01 pm Post subject: Rean Clover wrote: I don't understand the difference between a landspout and a tornado. Can someone tell me?
landspout :

A small, weak tornado, which is not formed by a storm-scale rotation. It is generally weaker than a supercell tornado and is not associated with a wall cloud or mesocyclone. It may be observed beneath cumulonimbus or towering cumulus clouds and is the land equivalent of a waterspout.

www.weatherquests.com/services/knowledge/glossary/
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Paul Knightley


Joined: 06 Feb 2006
Posts: 63
Location: Reading, England

Posted: Tue Aug 22, 2006 6:13 am
Post subject:
Rich Dorfman said:
Rean Clover wrote: I don't understand the difference between a landspout and a tornado. Can someone tell me?

IMO, fundamentally there is no difference - they are both tornadoes. It is, of course, prudent to understand the mechanisms at work. The problem of trying to compartmentalise a tornado into a supercell/non-supercell frame work comes undone when tornadoes develop within a supercell, but not directly under the main wall cloud - this happened in the El Reno storm of April this year...cyclonic vorticity on the left hand side of the RFD (looking in the direction of motion of the RFD) was stretched by the supercell's main updraught to form a classic "supercell" tornado...however, a few minutes later anticyclonic vorticity on the right hand side of the RFD was stretched into a tornado (which is what may be classed as a "landspout" if you like, which I don't!) by an updraught within the storm's flanking line.

So, was the fact that there was a supercell present pertinent to the torndoes' formation? Possibly - but had a wind shift line been present (e.g. an outflow boundary) a tornado could have developed from local vorticity along that, much like the 2nd tornado did at El Reno - in this case, the wind shift line was the RFD!
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Rean Clover

Joined: 06 Mar 2006
Posts: 19
Location: Iowa
Posted: Tue Aug 22, 2006 9:30 pm
Post subject: Thank you for answering my question.
 
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