What do you look for in a Chase Highlight Video?

What is your price LIMIT to spend on a chase DVD?


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What do you look for in a chase highlight video? I am talking as in musical montages, free-of musical montages, etc, lol. When you get a video, what do you want to see in it?

My biggest question is, what price is your limit to pay for a DVD? I am thinking of charging $25 shipped for my DVD, but I may go lower to $20...
 
For a DVD Including Shipping and Handling, I would pay 19.95 at the most Paying 20 dollars and up, like 25 or 35 bucks, I would not buy a DVD, I rather spend the money toward a AMS Conference Preprint or some books on meteorology.

Mike
 
The most important things that I look for in a chase highlight video are:
-high quality video (doesn't have to be a 'naderfest'-good structure shots work fine!)
-timelapses are awesome!
-good, but not excessive, commentary
-soundtrack is a must ( I much rather have a rockin' soundtrack over whooping and hollering)
-the production (cost factor)
-'comic relief' (brief blooper reels are hilarious)

As for how much I would pay...it depends on the quality of the video. I don't think I've paid more than $25, though.
 
I contrast to some of the points above. The one thing I ALWAYS look for is whether or not the video has a soundtrack. If it does, then forget about it. I like the thunder, wind, tornado sirens, etc.. going off. I guess if the whooping and hollering is excessive, then a soundtrack would work fine for those scenes... But everything else should be left in tact.
 
I contrast to some of the points above. The one thing I ALWAYS look for is whether or not the video has a soundtrack. If it does, then forget about it. I like the thunder, wind, tornado sirens, etc.. going off. I guess if the whooping and hollering is excessive, then a soundtrack would work fine for those scenes... But everything else should be left in tact.

I agree, I like to crank the tv so i get the full experience, so i can close everything out and day dream about what it would've been like to be there at that point in time. also handy during severe winter sds. :wink:
 
I'm somewhere in between. I like the natural audio that the storm provides, but a good sountrack can keep it from getting dull. Soundtracks are great during timelapse or clip segments of the less noteworthy storms. A mix of audio will keep the viewer interested in my opinion.
 
I enjoy raw footage. I want to feel like I was there. A time lapse or two with a soundtrack is fine, I just don't like it when it takes up most of the DVD. I like the stuff most people would cut out :lol:

I like a highlight video that reflects the personality of the chaser. I want to see the blooper moments, plus the intense tornadoes.
 
I contrast to some of the points above. The one thing I ALWAYS look for is whether or not the video has a soundtrack. If it does, then forget about it. I like the thunder, wind, tornado sirens, etc.. going off. I guess if the whooping and hollering is excessive, then a soundtrack would work fine for those scenes... But everything else should be left in tact.

What I like...is showing the entire segment with live sound. And then maybe doing time lapse...or, still images set to music after the main video of the event.
 
Speaking of soundtracks, I am curious about something. We have seen that everybody here is obviously very sensitive about copyrights and other people stealing their images. What I am wondering is if those who put soundtracks on their highlight tape/dvd's are using copyrighted music, and if so, are you paying royalties?

Just something to think about.
 
I have been collecting royalty free clips for years now. Most are the pay per track kind, but I do have a 5 disc set of some pretty good stuff.
 
Using music /soundtrack in DVD's, is okay, if not use too much,
People have different muisc tastes, the person who is making
the DVD, wow, this is great music, may not appeal to others.
I rather hear, the storms and etc. Also. less talk from the people,
is a plus. Some people, to be honest are annoying to listen too.

Mike
 
There are three potential audiences for chase videos: 1.) the relatively small community of active or 'hardcore' chasers, 2.) non-chasers with a moderate interest in severe weather, and 3.) people with little or no interest in weather, but who think tornadoes and storms are kind of cool (the types that watch the National Geographic specials if they aren't busy that evening)

It seems that most chase videos are built for audience #1. Has anyone ever done videos for #2 or #3? #3 would encompass most of the population, I would guess.

My inclination is to design something for #2 and #3 that can still relate to #1. Easier said than done.

If you've ever done a video for these different audiences, in what ways did you do things differently for each one?
 
Let’s see, what do I look for in a chase video?

Umm, Mike Hollingshead’s name on the label? :wink:
Seriously, the highlight tapes I have of Mike’s are among my favorites. I love the integration of music, and interesting music at that; plus I absolutely love storm structure, which he excels at. His still camera shots, set to music, are often as interesting as the video. Mike just has an artist’s eye for these things. He gets great storms, of course, but he also manages to go after storms that other chasers might ignore, and then he makes them look absolutely spectacular (the storms that is, not the other chasers).

Off Topic: Wow! As I write this we just had a surprise severe thunderstorm go through (it’s 5:30 am here) that hit my block with several CGs, one of which must have hit the building itself. My computer got knocked offline, and I lost the reply I was composing... No major damage, tho. Very close lightning, the initial snap from the leader was intense, and then the main bolt was DEAFENING! Several others hit almost as close... All this courtesy of a subtropical system that formed off the east coast and moved north. Looking at radar, it looks like what might have been a short-lived supercell just exploded over New Haven in a rainband just to the northeast of the circulation center. Cool! And completely unexpected.
 
Speaking of soundtracks, I am curious about something. We have seen that everybody here is obviously very sensitive about copyrights and other people stealing their images. What I am wondering is if those who put soundtracks on their highlight tape/dvd's are using copyrighted music, and if so, are you paying royalties?

Just something to think about.

I obtained written permission years ago from my favorite band, King's X. I use their music exclusively in all my videos. They let me use as much of it as I want for free, with the condition that I give them credit, don't use any outside distribution (such as selling in stores), and free copies of every video.
 
There are three potential audiences for chase videos: 1.) the relatively small community of active or 'hardcore' chasers, 2.) non-chasers with a moderate interest in severe weather, and 3.) people with little or no interest in weather, but who think tornadoes and storms are kind of cool (the types that watch the National Geographic specials if they aren't busy that evening)

It seems that most chase videos are built for audience #1. Has anyone ever done videos for #2 or #3? #3 would encompass most of the population, I would guess.

My inclination is to design something for #2 and #3 that can still relate to #1. Easier said than done.

If you've ever done a video for these different audiences, in what ways did you do things differently for each one?

I make my videos to suit me, period. I don't think about the audience when I'm putting a video together, I satisfy myself. As for the target audience, IMO that's more of a marketing thing. I market to the casual storm fan (tornado freaks), I guess that would be Dan's #3 catagory.

I like raw footage, the stuff most people get bored with. I'm definitely not a chopper, it kills me to cut out any footage of tornadoes. If the tornado's 14 minutes long, I'm putting 14 minutes of it on my video. I like my videos to reflect the actual event as close as possible, so I don't use music over video. I am, however, very adament about music with credits and intros. My credits are alwaus heavy though, as I try to think of every possible person to thank. My credits take up an entire 4-5 minute song. And for those who have the patience to sit through the credits....well, there just might be something else waiting for them :wink:
 
Along the same lines as the target audience, how many of you actually try your hand and "real" production? Story Boarding, then putting it all together, with a particular set in mind?
 
My credits take up an entire 4-5 minute song. And for those who have the patience to sit through the credits....well, there just might be something else waiting for them :wink:

lol! Yep might be...

I love making chasing DVD's but I hate watching them. I don't even watch my own unless there is nothing else to do. I personally would not buy a chase DVD. I have only bought one and it was a great DVD but for some reason film doesn't do much for me. If I did buy another one I would not pay over $20 for it and that includes shipping. I like to keep my own DVD less than $15. I don't care if my DVD was full of tornadoes and awesome structure I personally don't think any DVD is worth more than $15 - $20. I know chasers don't make millions off their DVD's So I can understand charging $20+ for the DVD. The market is not there for it and that's probably good in some way or other but that’s another topic.

Unfortunately I live in Oklahoma and we don't get tornadoes nor good storms here any longer. So I am moving up north so I can give H a run for his money. Lol! You scared H? You should be! I am goanna open a can of Ptak attack. Lol! Just kidding to damn cold up there in the winter for me.

As far as soundtracks go I think a good mix of music and plain raw video is good. That's what I am doing on my next chase DVD. It keeps the viewers attention better IMO.

Mick
 
Along the same lines as the target audience, how many of you actually try your hand and "real" production? Story Boarding, then putting it all together, with a particular set in mind?

Working on one now and it is a hard task, but I like it.

Mick
 
My 2004 chase video was my first attempt at putting something together. I tried to get a nice mix of tornadoes, storms, music videos, timelapse, and bloopers. I think I did well in putting it all together, although there was definately room for improvement. I enjoy putting together the highlights and playing around with things. I think I basically will punch out what I like and let everyone else adjust. Not to say I don't target an audience as I think I try to mix it up a bit. And it works out well... this season I was lacking on quality video to make a highlight video, but I'm sure there will be enough to include some goodies and a few bloopers.

Nick G, remember us raiding your hotel room (the Johnny Depp episode in Childress); that'll be on the blooper reel! :lol:
 
I tried to get a nice mix of tornadoes, storms, music videos, timelapse, and bloopers. I think I did well in putting it all together,

I like a nice mix in DVD's. One thing I enjoyed about Tony's was a variety of weather (tornadoes, hail, flooding, lightning). He also showed other aspects of chasing (looking at data, waiting for initiation, bloopers, chaser convergences, etc).
 
If you like watching chasers wait for initiation, bloopers, and a general lack of tornado-y goodness, you'll love "Funnel Fiasco's 2005 Chase Lowlights" Coming sometime not-too-soon to a city near you.
 
There are three potential audiences for chase videos: 1.) the relatively small community of active or 'hardcore' chasers, 2.) non-chasers with a moderate interest in severe weather, and 3.) people with little or no interest in weather, but who think tornadoes and storms are kind of cool (the types that watch the National Geographic specials if they aren't busy that evening)

It seems that most chase videos are built for audience #1. Has anyone ever done videos for #2 or #3? #3 would encompass most of the population, I would guess.

My inclination is to design something for #2 and #3 that can still relate to #1. Easier said than done.

If you've ever done a video for these different audiences, in what ways did you do things differently for each one?

Dan, yeah, I really want my DVD to appeal to non-storm chaser audiences (audience #3) simply because they are the largest audience. I was even thinking of setting up at this one upper-class type of flea-market here in Metro Detroit, that hundreds of thousands go to every month, and setting up a table with my laptop showing a 10MIN preview of the DVD constantly or something. I personally think it would attract alot of people and sell a few copies...
 
There are three potential audiences for chase videos: 1.) the relatively small community of active or 'hardcore' chasers, 2.) non-chasers with a moderate interest in severe weather, and 3.) people with little or no interest in weather, but who think tornadoes and storms are kind of cool (the types that watch the National Geographic specials if they aren't busy that evening)

It seems that most chase videos are built for audience #1. Has anyone ever done videos for #2 or #3? #3 would encompass most of the population, I would guess.

My inclination is to design something for #2 and #3 that can still relate to #1. Easier said than done.

If you've ever done a video for these different audiences, in what ways did you do things differently for each one?

Dan, yeah, I really want my DVD to appeal to non-storm chaser audiences (audience #3) simply because they are the largest audience. I was even thinking of setting up at this one upper-class type of flea-market here in Metro Detroit, that hundreds of thousands go to every month, and setting up a table with my laptop showing a 10MIN preview of the DVD constantly or something. I personally think it would attract alot of people and sell a few copies...

What upper class flea market are you talking about?
 
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