Video editing hardware

I moved into my dorm and have been asking around to see if anyone had and video editing hardware, however I have been unsuccessful at finding anyone that does. I have been trying to put my video back up onto my computer so that I may put some images/video on to my website. So it looks like I may have to just go and buy what I need. Therefore, anyone recommend any video editing hardware, preferably a USB device, and cheap?

*edit* never mind I have bought hardware now anyways...
 
most editing is done with software..not hardware.. Hardware is often used by some editing packages though to help render the footage..
 
Originally posted by fplowman
most editing is done with software..not hardware.. Hardware is often used by some editing packages though to help render the footage..

I believe he's talking about "capture" hardware to get analog video into the computer in the first place.

Robert, there's quite a lot of equipment available out there for this. I've personally found that internal capture cards tend to work better than external USB attached type devices, but others may have had other experiences. You can find these devices for a reasonable price these days, however be aware that the cheaper ones are often devoid of useful features and may not produce the results you're after.

This link will give you an idea of some of the consumer oriented equipment available out there: http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/ca....asp?CatId=1423
 
Oh...

Well firewire is a standard for video capturing. Firewire cards are available somewhat inexpensively.. $40 or so..
 
Originally posted by fplowman
Oh...

Well firewire is a standard for video capturing. Firewire cards are available somewhat inexpensively.. $40 or so..

Firewire is only good if your video hardware supports it; if you're using an older Hi8 camera for instance, you're out of luck.
 
Originally posted by John B Erwin+--><div class='quotetop'>QUOTE(John B Erwin)</div>
<!--QuoteBegin-fplowman
Oh...

Well firewire is a standard for video capturing. Firewire cards are available somewhat inexpensively.. $40 or so..

Firewire is only good if your video hardware supports it; if you're using an older Hi8 camera for instance, you're out of luck.[/b]

Hopefully the folks that chase and use video etc.. know that ;) I should have been more more detailed in my post. I can tell your very passionate about your video editing.... lol

I use and own...

Panasonic DVX100A's
Sennheiser G2 wireless
Sennheiser MS66 shotgun
Frezzi lighting system
Bogen tripod and monopod
Portabrace covers and bags
Vegas editing system..


1 question. Is the avatar your using a nearfield monitor? I take it if so your a sound man.. :)


Fred
 
Originally posted by fplowman
1 question. Is the avatar your using a nearfield monitor? I take it if so your a sound man.. :)

Hi Fred;

Nope, that's good 'ol Hal 9000 from "2001:A space oddesy"!

That's an impressive list of equipment you have there; I don't have anything that could touch it. I'm only just now looking at getting a 3ccd camcorder..

You're obviously a lot heavier into modern video than I am, although I do have a lot of experience with the IT end of things and older video technologies (used to do a lot of work on a "video toaster").

Cheers,

John
 
Not making a plug here, but you might take a look at Pinnacle's line of "Dazzle" equipment. I believe they are USB and will take in the older analog tapes fed through the Analog (RCA) jacks.
The Dazzle DVC 80 is USB and runs about $70 on their web site. I would bet that if you look around hard enough, you will find a better price.

I believe Canopus has an offering, and ADS Pyro, has something along these lines.

After that, things get rather expensive as you start getting into the Pro market.

****
Hey John....
Are you talking about the Amiga system the Video Toaster that works on those systems? Those things are still in use!
 
Good advice John D,

John B i remember the Toaster...lol.. Man, how far we have come. Cost have certainly come down from those days.. Otherwise I guess I would still be saving up for my first camera.. hehehe :)
 
Yes, that was the Amiga-based toaster that I was using. Of course, there was a high degree of dependancy on other quality equipment to make everything work well (source video, pro VCRs etc). Had a lot of fun!

Like Fred says, you can duplicate a lot of that with a lot less expensive equipment now; especially if everything is digital.
 
Oh man! Do I remember the Amiga Days! My first "real" computer was an Amiga 500 with 2 MB of Ram. No Hard drive though. I think if I had spent another $500 I could've had a 12 MB HD. I did some wild stuff with that thing. Years ahead of anything at the time. As far as that goes, it can still keep up with most low end professional systems today.

Mine worked great right until my 2 year old sone decided to feed the floppy drive a couple of quarters. I think that change bounced off of every chip on the way through.

If I remember correctly, wasn't the old Sci-Fi flick, "Max Headroom" done primarily on the Amiga based system?

Today's NLE's are quite a bit more sofisticated than the old Amiga stuff I played with though. Capturing Analog video is especially tough. That's why I looked at the Pinnacle Equipment. They also have the DV500 and you can still find the DC10 series of equipment. It will mean opening up your computer and placing the capture card, but it does work and usually works out quite well.

I've been pricing components for a dedicated Video Editing machine for my own system. I figure I can do it for about $1500 using the best CPU I can get. If I were to go Dual Processor, I can probably do it for about $2500. Get this.... with the new SATA HDD specs, I can add in up to a Terrabyte of storage internally! Folks, that's a lot of video. I've got a 200 GB now that's taken with OS and programs, I can still get about 6 hours of total raw capture on it.

Sorry about teh thread jack!!!!! 8)
 
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