Striking Tornado Photo from April 2, 2006 Outbreak.

Michael Auker

I'm not sure if this photo has been posted yet or not...but I was very impressed by it. I would rank it in my top ten list of tornado photographs.
Hopkinsville_Tornado_Jennie_Stuart_webcam_910pm.jpg
 
I'm not sure if this photo has been posted yet or not...but I was very impressed by it. I would rank it in my top ten list of tornado photographs.
Hopkinsville_Tornado_Jennie_Stuart_webcam_910pm.jpg

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Thats one of those photos that is almost scary.
 
No that is one of those photos that IS scary! To be looking over a town at a storm and with lightning strikes being able to see something that big, that is downright scary!
 
Just some food for thought......

Which tornado in which state was this?

What kind of damage did it cause?

How do we know this is a tornado?

K.
 
Subject says it was Hopkinsville, Ky. Before I saw that I was thinking the Carthursville (spel) MO Tornado, that parking lot right in front of the picture reminds me of the surveillance video one of the news sites put up.
 
Just some food for thought......

Which tornado in which state was this?

What kind of damage did it cause?

How do we know this is a tornado?

K.
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Here is more information: Hopkinsville, Ky Tornado. The photo was taken via web-cam from the roof of Jennie Stuart Medical Center in downtown Hopkinsville.
 
I can't help but notice the light that is peeking through on the upper right corner of the image. Is this the edge of the tornado cyclone? Kind of a weird place for light to shine through, so I'm half wondering if that is the vault region and the tornado is really a lot further away than it appears. Just an observation.

Gabe
 
im thinking that what you are seeing as the actual tornado is actually just a really low wall cloud that contains a tornado.
look at the power flash, dead center of the "funnel" look to the left of it. looks like a wall cloud base. i could be wrong. if that is all funnel, its quite a monster.
 
I can't help but notice the light that is peeking through on the upper right corner of the image. Is this the edge of the tornado cyclone? Kind of a weird place for light to shine through, so I'm half wondering if that is the vault region and the tornado is really a lot further away than it appears. Just an observation.

Gabe
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My sentiments exactly. That small chink of light to the upper-right of the "tornado" troubled me enough to be the first one to post any questioning of this image. If it were the apparent mile-wide wedge that some think it is - I don't think you'd be seeing any weakness in the updraft/wall cloud in this region. That's what started ringing alarm bells for me.

I'd have to say that this is NOT a big ol' wedge tornado. It may be a ground-scraping wall cloud with a much smaller tornado under it - or the actual action area is much further away. It could also be a rather nasty-looking scud bomb......but I guess there was some damage reported with this feature which was classified as a tornado.

It is good, however, to ask questions and not take things at face-value.

K.
 
Damage photos and damage track maps are available at:

http://www.crh.noaa.gov/crnews/display_sto...d=2125&source=0

Obviously considerable damage - could not see what the rating was, but would guess F3 - and a long and fairly wide path. Can't tell exact path width as the maps do not show a scale of miles, but would guess at least 1/2 mile. The tornado was several miles from downtown Hopkinsville.

I wondered some of the same things as Karen when I saw the picture, but based on the damage survey it would appear that it is the real deal.
 
kytor.jpg


Taking a closer look, it appears the mass is a wall cloud with a barrel/wedge underneath. I added a some outline overlays to the image above.
 
kytor.jpg


Taking a closer look, it appears the mass is a wall cloud with a barrel/wedge underneath. I added a some outline overlays to the image above.
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That would seem to make more sense than that whole mass of cloud being on the ground. Plus, it makes the little "hole" in the upper-right portioin of the image a bit easier to explain. I think that this represents the edge of the tornado cyclone which means that this tornado is probably fairly distant from the camera that captured it.

Gabe
 
Regardless of whether or not it was a tornado ... It would still be pretty scary to see that coming at you (provided you're not expecting it). Now, if I was on a chase and had my system setup and noticed I'm on the edge of a hook echo -- it might not be so hair-raising. ;)
 
Here's a few more pennies...

TornadoDetails.jpg


The dark splotches in 1 and 2 appear to be some nearby scud. And where there's scud, there's usually more scud. As such, the contents of 3 are subject to opinion. Maybe the bottom of 3 is one feature while the top is another. Since it's lit all weird by the lightning, any number of things could be occupying that dark space. And finally, number 4 was an interesting feature. Rain wrap? Maybe something closer to the camera in just the right place?
 
Here's a few more pennies...

TornadoDetails.jpg


The dark splotches in 1 and 2 appear to be some nearby scud. And where there's scud, there's usually more scud. As such, the contents of 3 are subject to opinion. Maybe the bottom of 3 is one feature while the top is another. Since it's lit all weird by the lightning, any number of things could be occupying that dark space. And finally, number 4 was an interesting feature. Rain wrap? Maybe something closer to the camera in just the right place?
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Tornado or not, anyway you slice it, thats one scary lookin' picture. ;)
 
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