Hurricane Ivan, Frances's southern relative

Internet radio is such a great thing.

Having listened to much of the radio coverage online through Frances, I turned an ear toward Ivan.

Voice of Barbados has a very high quality live audio stream at http://www.vob929.com/

They've been doing regular updates on Ivan (mainly reading the advisories) and are getting emergency preparedness info from the local governmental agencies.

It looks like this might become some very interesting listening over the next few days, esp. if Ivan makes the bee-line that is forecast right now. In the meantime, they're also playing some pretty cool Caribbean music, with a decidedly western influence.

MP
 
Does anybody know what the track of that CAT 5 to hit the Keys was (back in the 30's)? Did it cross over Cuba or did it find its way through the Florida Straits without hitting land before Florida?
 
Thanks, I also found it on wunderground. To answer my question it navigated its way around The Bahamas and through the straits.
 
Top Ten Equatorward Hurricanes (1922-2004)
This shows the most equatorward location where a storm contained hurricane strength winds, according to estimates or measurements. Of course this is kind of like splitting hairs, but hopefully it's somewhat educational. I also just whipped this up in ten minutes and by eyeballing NHC charts, so please don't hold it as authoritative.

10. 12.9N Hurricane Hugo (13 Sep 1989) - Was still very far east when it reached 12.9N, recurved toward SC
9. 12.8N Hurricane Hazel (5 Oct 1954) - Hit Grenada
8. 12.4N Hurricane Janet (22 Sep 1955) - Hit Grenada again
7. 11.7N Hurricane Cesar (27 July 1996) - Rare track near the Panama coast, landfall in Costa Rica
6. 11.2N Hurricane Joan (20 Oct 1988) - TS landfall in Venezuela, then strengthened off Panama coast!
5. 10.8N Hurricane Gertrude (30 Sep 1974) - Did a loop-de-loop east of Trinidad, became TS near Grenada
4. 10.4N Hurricane Joyce (29 Sep 2000) - Died to TS before recurving north and restrengthening
3. 10.3N Hurricane Flora (30 Sep 1963) - Formed at 8N, brushed Trinidad and Grenada
2. 9.7N Hurricane Ivan (5 Sep 2004) - Hit Grenada
1. 9.3N Hurricane #2 (27 June 1933) - Grazed Venezuela

Looks like we have a definitive recordholder here, at least for the modern era.

Honorable mention
14 Aug 1990 - Tropical Storm Fran hit the Venezuelan coast; had gotten as far south as 8N when it was a tropical disturbance
7 Aug 1993 - Tropical Storm Bret takes a similar track, getting down to 10N then hitting Trinidad & Tobago and Venezuela

BTW, one should look at Hurricane Ginger for a really deviant track. Not that it has anything to do with southerly storms, but it was just neat.
http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/tracks/1971.gif

Tim
 
Also of honorable mention — while hurricane Gilbert's eye passed south of Puerto Rico on 9/13/1988, its southern edge passed over Venezuela and resulted in 50 fatalities.
 
Ivan is 4-5 days from a Florida landfall. At this point in Frances' track it was almost wall to wall coverage on TWC. I think there is a little complacency that they can't be hit with two hurricanes in a week, not to mention they are a pretty worn out.
 
With hurricane Ivan now reaching the ultimate status of category 5, a question comes to my mind. What is the maximum sustained winds recorded or estimated in a cat 5 hurricane? Could a storm strengthen to (hypothetically) beyond a cat 5, if such a classification was included on the Saffir-Simpson scale?
 
The most intense hurricanes occur in the Pacific, as Typhoons. The most intense hurricane in the Atlantic was Gilbert (1988 I believe). That's debateable though as to how you want to classify a hurricane. Lowest pressure, highest wind, highest gust, most damage, most fatalities, etc.
 
Originally posted by Tim Vasquez
Top Ten Equatorward Hurricanes (1922-2004)
Very interesting Tim, thank you!

We're following your hurricane reports from Israel, because during this time of year the weather over here is extreme in it's boredom :)
 
TWC just did an interesting graphic about CAT 5 hurricanes in the Atlantic. It showed that most CAT 5's remain at that intensity for less than a day. And only 1 since 1949 was a CAT 5 for 2-3 days.
 
Jamaicans...Only concrete is going to save you tonight, not God.

The mis-information and lack of preparedness is really starting to show in Jamaica. I can't count how many Jamaicans I've heard on tv saying 'everything is going to be okay because God will save us!'

God might get you through the aftermath, but not tonight. Even the radio hosts are encouraging this.
 
Does anyone have a good page on-file of the lowest recorded pressures in hurricanes (not at the time of landfall). The only one I can seem to find ranks hurricanes by lowest pressure at time of landfall. I want lowest pressure overall. Thanks.

(just want to see where Ivan ranks, now that it's at 910mb :shock: )
 
Yes, I too was surprised that I could not find any such list. So I crunched these out of the NHC HURDAT files last night. Ivan is not on here but it would be 912 mb, at least so far.

Tim

Code:
Year     Name     Mb   Date    Wind   Date



ATLANTIC BASIN

1988	GILBERT	888	09/14	160	09/14

1935	NOT NAMED	892	09/03	140	09/03

1980	ALLEN	899	08/07	165	08/07

1969	CAMILLE	905	08/17	165	08/17

1998	MITCH	905	10/26	155	10/26

1955	JANET	914	09/27	150	09/28

2003	ISABEL	915	09/11	145	09/11

1989	HUGO	918	09/15	140	09/15

1995	OPAL	919	10/04	130	10/04

1961	HATTIE	920	10/31	140	10/30

1985	GLORIA	920	09/25	125	09/25

1999	FLOYD	921	09/13	135	09/13

1992	ANDREW	922	08/23	150	08/23

1967	BEULAH	923	09/19	140	09/20

1853	NOT NAMED	924	09/03	130	09/03

1910	NOT NAMED	924	10/17	130	10/16

1979	DAVID	924	08/30	150	08/30

1886	NOT NAMED	925	08/20	135	08/20

1977	ANITA	926	09/02	150	09/02

1961	ESTHER	927	09/17	125	09/18

1989	GABRIELLE	927	09/04	125	09/05

1880	NOT NAMED	928	10/02	120	10/01

1974	CARMEN	928	09/02	130	09/02

1928	NOT NAMED	929	09/17	140	09/13

1953	CAROL	929	09/03	130	09/03

1966	INEZ	929	09/29	130	09/28

1995	FELIX	929	08/12	120	08/12



EAST PACIFIC BASIN

1997	LINDA	902	09/12	160	09/12

2002	KENNA	913	10/25	145	10/25

1973	AVA	915	6  6	140	6  7

1997	GUILLERMO	919	08/05	140	08/04

1994	GILMA	920	07/24	140	07/24

2002	ELIDA	921	07/25	140	07/25

2002	HERNAN	921	09/01	140	09/01

1994	OLIVIA	923	09/25	130	09/25

2001	JULIETTE	923	09/25	125	09/25

1990	TRUDY	924	10/20	135	10/20

1976	ANNETTE	925	6  9	120	6 10

(Edited to fix an import problem and to remove Pacific's Fabio, which was an error in the HURDAT database.)
 
Originally posted by Tim Vasquez
Yes, I too was surprised that I could not find any such list. So I crunched these out of the NHC HURDAT files last night. Ivan is not on here but it would be 912 mb, at least so far.

Tim

[[/code]

Interesting list. Saw some familiar names but some were stronger than I had realized. However, there is one omission from the Atlantic storms -- Andrew in 1992, which I think checked in at 922 mb at landfall and may have been lower earlier. Peak wind was at least 140 mph.
 
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