Hurricane In Kansas??

Larry J. Kosch

Did anybody see the amazing photo that GOES-12 VIS SAT was showing this morning (07/16/04)?? There was a low pressure system sitting in the Sunflower State with clouds in spiraling bands. That system held together for most of the morning until it tore itself apart and left half of the cloud system sitting in the bottom half of the state.

http://www.geocities.com/ljkosch55/GOES_12...nsas_Low_02.jpg
(Photo Courtesy of Colorado State University)

Here's a link to a couple of GOES-12 photos on my website, Storm Chasing in SE Nebraska:

http://www.geocities.com/ljkosch55/Best_St...age_2_2004.html

I will try to get the website updated in the next couple of weeks as soon as I can get some more storm photos ready. Hey thanks to StormTrack viewers like you, my web count has gone over 340 hits for the past month. Thanks!!

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Haven't look at it much yet, but looks like an MCV -- a mesoscale convective vortex. These are spawned, typically, by well-organized convective complexes... Mike G can post some good links I'm sure regarding MCVs... Note that many of the surrounding NWSFOs mention the MCVs in their area forecast discussions (e.g. OUN, ICT, TUL/TSA, etc)
 
Haven't look at it much yet, but looks like an MCV -- a mesoscale convective vortex. These are spawned, typically, by well-organized convective complexes... Mike G can post some good links I'm sure regarding MCVs... Note that many of the surrounding NWSFOs mention the MCVs in their area forecast discussions (e.g. OUN, ICT, TUL/TSA, etc)

I was gonna say MCV earlier, but I wasn't sure if there was convective activity in that region prior (didn't wanna sound like an idiot)...
 
I didn't see a loop from this morning, but it looks like the cirrus debris is curved anticyclonically. MCS's/MCC's will produce upper level anticyclones over them, somewhat similar to how tropical systems will have anticyclonic outflow at high levels.

That's a great image though! It truly does resemble a tropical system, IMHO... except that it's over Kansas and not 26C ocean waters...

Jim
 
I believe that a tropical system starts out as a Mesoscale convective complex, it seems to me that there is very little difference, except that there just isn't any water to sustain the thing. For a little bit, you have a tropical - type low in the wheat fields.
 
I believe that a tropical system starts out as a Mesoscale convective complex, it seems to me that there is very little difference, except that there just isn't any water to sustain the thing. For a little bit, you have a tropical - type low in the wheat fields.

Theres actually some pretty big differences between MCSs and tropical activity. Tropical cyclones have very low SFC pressure (obviously), with high pressure aloft (the high pressure allows air to sink into the eye). The strongest winds are found at the SFC-850mb as well, where-as extratropical systems/MCSs tend to have the stronger wind aloft (except for SFC based convective wind gusts). I am no hurricane expert either, so feel free to correct me if I am wrong, or add in extra details...
 
The storms that hit yesterday morning here in MO were intense. I was at work and when the storm warning came out it said hurricane type winds. I watched the storm from my clients front porch and it looked just like the videos I've seen of hurricanes. It was awesome to watch.
 
GOES-10 and GOES-12

Someone asked me for the URLs for the GOES SATS:

http://www.cira.colostate.edu/Special/Curr...Wx/g12arm10.asp

This connects you to the GOES-12 SAT which gives you a view of NE and CO from the SE. If you wanted to see the SW view, change the g12arm to g10arm in the URL.

That will switch you to the GOES-10 SAT, which will give you a SW view of NE, a better view of OK, TX and some of the states further east. The pictures are updated every five minutes so if you watch it carefully when it refreshes, you can see the progress of the storms.

I find this site useful in looking at cloud fomations and I love seeing how the boundaries shows up on the VIS SAT. And when the storms fire up, they look like little white flattop mushrooms growing. And you can see how the overshooting tops would float off into the next state. When a storm is tornadic, you can sometimes see the domes come up on top of the cloud formations. And when the sun starts going down in the west, you can actually see the shadows of the cloud tops on the ground in the SE view and the backside of the storms in the SW view. On a clear day you can see medium size lakes and rivers. Once CO was totally clear and I can see snow on the mountain tops.

I look at GOES-10 and GOES-12 a lot because you can see the storms forming long before they show up on NWS radar. And you can anticipate a SWW watch long before its issued.

Today it looks a little bored, but when the storms come, watch out!!

Larry
 
Sorry

Sorry... :oops: one word too many. I was using SWW as a short version of Severe Weather Watch. It was kinda dumb for me to refer to that acronym with a watch word attached. That's kinda like giving out a tornado warning warning. :lol:
 
Watch the clouds

You can watch the clouds as they develop on the Goes-12 VIS SAT. At times you will see a large fields of cumulus clouds develop. Then you may see an "edge" develop in the fields with clouds on one side and none on the other. That would be a boundary developing. Other times you can see an outflow boundary showing up as a line of small cumulus trailing the main storms. Those are places to watch for storm development.

Sometimes you will see a line or a mass of clouds coming up on the VIS SAT. If you check with NWS, there may be a MSC discussion about that particular area having severe thunderstorm potential. Then you pay particular attention to that area until the towers starts going up.

I found another VIS SAT web site that shows a good time loop. It shows the rate of development and the cloud movement:

http://weather.cod.edu/analysis/analysis.1kmvis.html

Just click on the state you are interested in and click on visible satellite animation.

Thanks for asking. 8)
 
Yep, thats one of the good things about visible satellite... You can see features that other sources cannot - (i.e. NEXRAD can't see the CU field developing, unless there is precip associated with it).
 
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