Forecasting Question

Afternoon everybody.

Quick question:

I've been using BUFKIT a lot lately for forecasting and model analysis, and I was wondering about the storm-inflow solution and low-level jet solution it produces.

1. Are the storm inflow and low level jet the same thing?

2. With the inflow, how does that influence chase position on a storm? Do you want to be on the same side of the storm as the inflow to get the best view?

Any other discussion comments about storm inflow and low level jet?
 
The low level jet is a feature commonly seen in the southern plains, generally at the interface of the convective boundary layer and the free atmosphere (about 1.5 km ASL) and is a small area of enhanced flow. It is not the same thing as storm inflow because the storm's inflow comes from the surface. However the LLJ is important because its presence can increase local values of helicity as well as assist in breaking the cap (through mass divergence).

I am not as sure about your second question, but my rule of thumb is to try to be anywhere on the south half of the mesocyclone to increase backlighting and to keep away from precip/hail cores. Since the inflow usually comes from the SE, I suppose it would be a good place to observe the storm from.
 
Originally posted by Kyle Masters


2. With the inflow, how does that influence chase position on a storm? Do you want to be on the same side of the storm as the inflow to get the best view?

I think for most chasers sitting in the inflow area is the spot of choice...(looking at the storm and the wind at your back). Typically, this does provide the best view and backlighting and keeps you out of the rain generally. However, in real practice, this isn't always as easily done as it is said. Road options (or lack there of) will greatly affect where your actually able to position, and nearby storms my affect as well. But ideally, that's where you would want to aim to position yourself for a good view of the RFB.
 
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