dynamic ip's on port 8080?

I know I have seen some stormtrack members servers on port 8080 so I thought I would post this question here.

I am building an apache server on my linux(fedora core 2) system and have it working just fine with-in my intanet but want to know how others passed the, cable/dsl, ISP block on port 80? I have tried to alter the apache .conf file with "listen" to 8080 and system IP of ...-...-...:8080, but am still unable to get it to go through.

The other question would refer how people get a dymamic IP address to translate into a (static) Domain Name? Use a Dynamic DNS service, or otherwise?

Thanks for any help.
 
Hmmm... My cable modem/provider doesn't have a block on port 8080. As a matter of fact, I purchased a static IP for $10.00 (Wide Open West).
 
Originally posted by rdewey
Hmmm... My cable modem/provider doesn't have a block on port 8080. As a matter of fact, I purchased a static IP for $10.00 (Wide Open West).

I know that cox blocks port 80 to prevent use w/o "business bundle" but I am curies about the static IP you got, do you have a link to explanation? Thanks.
 
Info

Well, that is a tuff thing to do. If you have a router that stays on all the time, you can request the router to keep the IP address that has been assigned to you forever. I'm not sure how well this works, though.

Another option is to use some of the free programs around on the net that will automatically update your web servers config when your address changes. A quick look on Google turned up this:

http://www.zoneedit.com/doc/dynamic.html

With this option, you will have to register a Domain Name with a registration service. This is fairly cheap (maybe $15 or $20 per year).

Hope that helps,

James
 
Jason,
Great question! I'm on Cox with port 80 blocked. Fortunately thats all they seem to block, FTP, POP3, SMTP all work with standard ports. To get around the block I susbscribe to a service from http://www.dyndns.org/ that will take a request on port 80 and redirect it to my server on 8080. It costs me $25 a year for the service. I have been using Fedora Core 3 with an Apache web server for a few months now. Upgraded from Redhat 9. Everything runs great, never have to reboot like I did when running Windows 2000 Server.
 
Re: Info

Originally posted by James Langford
Well, that is a tuff thing to do. If you have a router that stays on all the time, you can request the router to keep the IP address that has been assigned to you forever. I'm not sure how well this works, though.

Another option is to use some of the free programs around on the net that will automatically update your web servers config when your address changes. A quick look on Google turned up this:

http://www.zoneedit.com/doc/dynamic.html

With this option, you will have to register a Domain Name with a registration service. This is fairly cheap (maybe $15 or $20 per year).

Hope that helps,

James

James, I appreciate the input, but will keeping a IP address static within a router keep it static when your ISP gives you a dynamic IP? I would venture to say, no, but I'm not sure? I have seen the Dynamic DNA systems, but am trying to do it for free. I know if they have a software program to do it I can too, but dont know how.
 
here's the important part of my httpd.conf file:

Listen 8080
<VirtualHost _default_:8080>
DocumentRoot /var/www/html
DirectoryIndex index.html index.htm index.shtml index.php index.php4 index.php3 index.phtml index.cgi default.htm default.html
</VirtualHost>

If you are on the Cox OU student deal you can get 3 static IPs for $3/month extra.
 
Info

I just took a look at the configuration page for my Linksys Router. There is a checkbox option for "Keep IP Forever". Within the help, it says that this will automatically renew the IP address that is currently assigned forever. However, the smarter SPs will probably notice that the IP is not being released, as they usually like to charge more for people having static IPs. :(

I'm not sure how the programs work. Check out the page that I linked to, it may have some more info.

James
 
Originally posted by j_r_hehnly
here's the important part of my httpd.conf file:

Listen 8080
<VirtualHost _default_:8080>
DocumentRoot /var/www/html
DirectoryIndex index.html index.htm index.shtml index.php index.php4 index.php3 index.phtml index.cgi default.htm default.html
</VirtualHost>

If you are on the Cox OU student deal you can get 3 static IPs for $3/month extra.

Do you have to use the port "8080" to get thru cox? In addition to that I see that you allow those files to be accessed as entry files, am I wrong, problably so? Thanks for the imput. I haven't tried the virtual host b/c they had a different description of virtual host in the .conf file.
 
I suppose you could use any unused port you wish, except for 80. The DirectoryIndex lists the filenames that Apache will look for as the default file to serve for a directory instead of a directory listing.
 
II am building an apache server on my linux(fedora core 2) system and have it working just fine with-in my intanet but want to know how others passed the, cable/dsl, ISP block on port 80? I have tried to alter the apache .conf file with "listen" to 8080 and system IP of ...-...-...:8080, but am still unable to get it to go through.

The other question would refer how people get a dymamic IP address to translate into a (static) Domain Name? Use a Dynamic DNS service, or otherwise?

What I've done is use my router/firewall to translate packets. Something coming into my router on 8080 would be directed to an internal IP on port 80. I used it for a while to bypass my work firewall, sending out packets on port 443, which were redirected on my home router to port 22, so I had SSH login ability from work.

I'm using a DLink router -- the setup is in the web interface, very easy to configure. (I don't have a server operating at home right now, so it isn't something you could test...)

Also, when I needed it, I used zoneedit and a dynmaic DNS client to update the IP address. I've moved to a hosting provider, so I don't do that anymore.
 
II am building an apache server on my linux(fedora core 2) system and have it working just fine with-in my intanet but want to know how others passed the, cable/dsl, ISP block on port 80? I have tried to alter the apache .conf file with "listen" to 8080 and system IP of ...-...-...:8080, but am still unable to get it to go through.

The other question would refer how people get a dymamic IP address to translate into a (static) Domain Name? Use a Dynamic DNS service, or otherwise?

What I've done is use my router/firewall to translate packets. Something coming into my router on 8080 would be directed to an internal IP on port 80. I used it for a while to bypass my work firewall, sending out packets on port 443, which were redirected on my home router to port 22, so I had SSH login ability from work.

I'm using a DLink router -- the setup is in the web interface, very easy to configure. (I don't have a server operating at home right now, so it isn't something you could test...)

Also, when I needed it, I used zoneedit and a dynmaic DNS client to update the IP address. I've moved to a hosting provider, so I don't do that anymore.

Thanks, I have looked at this an my Linksys router and will try it out. Also I think zoneedit will be a good option for a DDNS service.
 
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