Chase Highlights video

I'm starting to make my first highlights video. Here's what It will include:

Some home clips of a hailstorm
May 7, 2002 cone/rope tornado in southern KS
May 4, 2003 Wedge tornado in Cherokee County, KS
Some storms between May 4 and 15th.
May 15th TX Panhandle Chase
Some home clips of storms
June 11, 2004 Iowa storm chase and tornados
June 12, 2004 tornados in southern KS
June 13, 2004 Monster supercell and tornados in NE

A total of 9 tornados, plenty of lightning, hail, inflow jets, and high winds.
I should be done with it within a month 8)

It will be available initially on VHS, then DVD :D
 
Chris,

Making your highlights video is always exciting as you get to observe features time and time again that you would not have seeing your footage once or twice. Video editing is actually a great pasttime.

Good luck with it.

Regards,

Jimmy Deguara
 
Originally posted by Jimmy Deguara
Chris,

Making your highlights video is always exciting as you get to observe features time and time again that you would not have seeing your footage once or twice. Video editing is actually a great pasttime.



It can be, but it can also be like eating glass. I spent the weekend working on my next project, running through three years' worth of footage taking time stamps for final editing. The first year was fun, the second year I kept falling asleep, and by the time I'd finished the last year, I didn't want to do a video anymore, lol.

MikeH was very accurate when he said that a ton of work goes into making a chase video. It's pretty much the same thing as a movie. For the hour or two of footage you actually see in the video, there's probably twice that which didn't make the cut (but was watched and sifted through). The result is satisfying, but the workload is anything but glamorous. It's even worse when you screw it up the first time, like I did on LOVE.
 
No doubt about a lot of time spent and you have to be motivated!

At least you guys have it somewhat easier as you make one set of DVD format. We have to consider DVD format for the US and Australia Europe - NTSC and PAL respectively. I am now just hoping that most US DVD players can play PAL!! Is this correct?

Regards,

Jimmy Deguara
 
Originally posted by Jimmy Deguara
At least you guys have it somewhat easier as you make one set of DVD format. We have to consider DVD format for the US and Australia Europe - NTSC and PAL respectively. I am now just hoping that most US DVD players can play PAL!! Is this correct?
Only on compatible players — although they're probably more common now than they were in previous years, and if worst comes to worst you can play PAL DVDs on a laptop with a DVD drive.

This is, of course, making the assumption that the DVD is an all-region disk: there's a whole 'nother can of worms for you. I think North America is Region 1, and Australia is Region 4 — and if your DVD is a Region 1 player, that's it, unless you install a chip that overrides the region data. However, if your disk is all-region, or Region 0, this is irrelevant. (If it's a DVD-R, it should be all-region.)
 
Thomas,

The problem though that I am finding is despite DVD players becoming more common to play both there still exists the problem of TV's in the US playing the NTSC signal only. Most DVD/VHS and TV's here in Australia and other countries with PAL format I assume can play both. I had a comment by a friend that perhaps it is easier to convert from PAL to NTSC rather than vice versa??

Any comments? I would also appreciate comments by those in the US that may know more about NTSC/PAL compatibility.

Regards,

Jimmy Deguara
 
Originally posted by Jimmy Deguara
Thomas,

The problem though that I am finding is despite DVD players becoming more common to play both there still exists the problem of TV's in the US playing the NTSC signal only. Most DVD/VHS and TV's here in Australia and other countries with PAL format I assume can play both. I had a comment by a friend that perhaps it is easier to convert from PAL to NTSC rather than vice versa??

Any comments? I would also appreciate comments by those in the US that may know more about NTSC/PAL compatibility.

Regards,

Jimmy Deguara
That's true; and if the TV can't pick up a PAL signal, you won't get watchable visuals. I don't know how common PAL playback TVs are in the U.S., so otherwise I guess all you can do is make specifically NTSC disks.
 
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