Tornado Art display in OKC May 4 - May 20

The Oklahoma City City Arts Center is hosting a display of work from two southern plains artists, Deanna Wood of Denton, Texas and George Wilson of Oklahoma City, which focuses on severe storms, tornadoes, and the relationship between these phenomena and the people who share the plains with them.

I have seen Deanna's work and believe that all chasers would find some value in this show, particularly those who are interested in the compositional elements of storm and tornado photography and imagery.

For chasers on vacation looking for "down day" activities, this is cool event to consider. Here's the full press release:

OKLAHOMA CITY, OK- Seeking Shelter: The Art of Deanna Wood and George Wilson features two dynamic artists who passionately capture and explore the forceful nature of tornadoes. Approaching their subject with different intentions, the two artists will provide visitors with a stirring experience that captures the destructiveness and energy of tornadoes as well as the nearly mythic presence these storms possess. These artists grapple with the majesty of nature’s force and examine the concept and perception of shelter as it relates to these great storms. Seeking Shelter: The Art of Deanna Wood and George Wilson will be on display in the Eleanor Kirkpatrick Gallery at City Arts Center from May 4, 2006 – May 20, 2006.

There will be an opening reception on Thursday, May 4, 2006 at City Arts Center from 5:30 p.m. – 7:30 p.m., free and open to the public. Music will be provided by a trio of percussionists from the University of Central Oklahoma. The Eleanor Kirkpatrick Gallery is located in City Arts Center at State Fair Park, 3000 General Pershing Blvd., OKC, OK. Gallery hours are Monday - Thursday 9:00 a.m. - 10:00 p.m. and Friday - Saturday 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Concluding the exhibit, Deanna Wood and George Wilson will discuss their work and artistic process on Saturday, May 20th, 2006 with a Conversation with the Artists. For more information regarding the exhibit or Conversation with the Artists call 405.951.0000 or log onto www.cityartscenter.org

Exploring the imposing, nearly omnipotent, presence of tornadoes as well as the humility they bring to their spectators and victims, Deanna Wood and George Wilson provide a beautiful and emotive homage to the destructive power of these storms. Seeking Shelter: The Art of Deanna Wood and George Wilson examines the interplay between an uncontrollable natural force and the people who seek refuge from its path. “Visitors to this exhibition will be confronted with installations, sculptures, and paintings that will challenge them to face their own thoughts, beliefs, and memories regarding the most fearsome and awe-inspiring natural force faced by Oklahomans,†explains Artistic Director Clint Stone.

Texan artist Deanna Wood’s work is inspired by recurring dreams about tornadoes. In her dreams these tornadoes loom in the distance threatening to cause injury and destruction. Wood likes viewers of her art to be unsure if the tornadoes in her images will remain in the distance or become an approaching danger. Wood uses some common images symbolically. Telephone poles and houses represent the safety of shelter. Trees and limbs represent the destruction and chaos of strong winds. Through all of these images, Wood illustrates the fragility of life. Speaking of her work, Wood states, “By focusing on the human need for order in the face of chaos, it serves as a reminder that life is fleeting.†Visitors to Seeking Shelter can expect to find Wood’s work crafted with a varied assortment of media including clay, wood, and encaustic technique. In the encaustic process, Wood melts beeswax and natural resin to create a wax medium. She then applies several layers of hot wax and fuses them to the surface of her work with a heat gun. Then alternating between scratching the surface and rubbing in oil paint, Wood creates painting that is rich in color and texture yet features an interesting play of opacity and transparency.

George Wilson, who has lived and worked in Oklahoma for the past 34 years, takes a different approach to his subject. Attempting to create art that depicts the transcendental nature of the human imagination, Wilson addresses the spiritual and mythical nature of both humans and tornadoes. He focuses on the action of the tornado and the counter reaction of humans to the tornado. He explores the creation and destruction cycle that accompanies tornado. He investigates the human response to tornadoes which includes fear, awe and mystery; feelings which according to the artist result in humor. Wilson states, “I make jokes about the possible permutations of tornadoes in my imaginary world.†Wilson is sculptor, metalsmith, and jeweler. His long artistic career has offered him the opportunity to work with other sculptors including Ken Little and Jesus Morales. During his career, Wilson’s style has evolved from realistic sculpture to its current state of abstraction laced with realistic elements.

This exhibit is supported by our season sponsors: Allied Arts, Classical KCSC 90.1FM, Kirkpatrick Family Fund, Oklahoma City Housing Authority and Southwestern Publishing.[/b]
 
Update from the OKC City Arts Center:

Conversation with the Artists at City Arts Center

City Arts Center is proud to present a free Conversation with the Artists featuring Deanna Wood and George Wilson this Saturday, May 20th at 2pm. Coinciding with the last day of the Seeking Shelter: The Art of Deanna Wood and George Wilson exhibition, this event will offer you the opportunity to learn about their artistic processes

Deanna Wood

Texan artist Deanna Wood’s work is inspired by recurring dreams about tornadoes. In her dreams these tornadoes loom in the distance threatening to cause injury and destruction. Wood likes viewers of her art to be unsure if the tornadoes in her images will remain in the distance or become an approaching danger. Wood uses some common images symbolically. Telephone poles and houses represent the safety of shelter. Trees and limbs represent the destruction and chaos of strong winds. Through all of these images, Wood illustrates the fragility of life. According to the artist, “By focusing on the human need for order in the face of chaos, it serves as a reminder that life is fleeting.â€￾ Visitors to Seeking Shelter can expect to find Wood’s work crafted with a varied assortment of media including clay, wood, and encaustic technique. In the encaustic process, Wood melts beeswax and natural resin to a create a wax medium. She then applies several layers of hot wax and fuses them to the surface of her work with a heat gun. Then alternating between scratching the surface and rubbing in oil paint, Wood creates painting that is rich in color and texture yet features an interesting play of opacity and transparency.

Visit Deanna's website at http://www.deannawood.com

George Wilson

George Wilson, who has lived and worked in Oklahoma for the past 34 years, takes a different approach to his subject. Attempting to create art that depicts the transcendental nature of the human imagination, Wilson addresses the spiritual and mythical nature of both humans and tornadoes. He focuses on the action of the tornado and the counter reaction of humans to the tornado. He explores the creation and destruction cycle that accompanies tornado. He investigates the human response to tornadoes which includes fear, awe and mystery; feelings which according to the artist result in humor. Wilson states, “I make jokes about the possible permutations of tornadoes in my imaginary world.â€￾ Wilson is sculptor, metalsmith, and jeweler. His long artistic career has offered him the opportunity to work with other sculptors including Ken Little and Jesus Morales. During his career, Wilson’s style has evolved from realistic sculpture to its current state of abstraction laced with realistic elements.

If you would like to read John Brandenburg’s review of the show please visit:

http://newsok.com/article/1835112/?templat...ertainment/main

This exhibit is supported by our season sponsors: Allied Arts, Classical KCSC 90.1FM, Kirkpatrick Family Fund, Oklahoma City Housing Authority and Southwestern Publishing.


Clint Stone
Artistic Director
City Arts Center
3000 Pershing Blvd
Oklahoma City, OK 73107
(405) 951.0000
www.cityartscenter.org
 
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