Now if you want to talk about an awesome shot...

Excellent shot... it's rare to see a tornado with such a LPish-looking updraft, partly because the LP's develop a poor precip cascade. However there is certainly a decent one present here (along with a bulky anvil). I wonder if this was formerly a great storm or if we're seeing part of another cell. I'd be surprised if this updraft was putting out all that anvil & precip.
 
Tim.... I (and my chase partners) were on that storm from initiation in northwestern KS. It was pretty LP from the get-go. While it was tornado-warned pretty much it's whole life in northenr KS, it was quite high-based and, while visually impressive with it's nice LP-esque updraft, had quite poor low-level rotation. IT was until it got very near the NE/KS border that a nice wallcloud developed. There was one attempt at a tornado, and it actually might have produced a tornado briefly, just south of the border, but there was a much more successful attempt as the storm neared REd Cloud. Personally, I think this was my favorite night-time tornado -- second only to the Anthony/Harper nighttime tornado on 5/12...
 
Excellent shot... it's rare to see a tornado with such a LPish-looking updraft, partly because the LP's develop a poor precip cascade. However there is certainly a decent one present here (along with a bulky anvil). I wonder if this was formerly a great storm or if we're seeing part of another cell. I'd be surprised if this updraft was putting out all that anvil & precip.

That was my exact impression as well. Looks not only LPish but low-topped; that can't be more than 30,000 feet. And I agree, the anvil doesn't look like it's a part of the storm.
 
When I first saw that shot, it brought tears to my eyes, bitter jealous tears.

:twisted:


One of those pictures that earn you accolades for the rest of your life, sorta like the guy who said "so why don't we just use Fed-Ex" as the junior executive and 50 years later he is eulogized for it.

Sorry, bitter jealous tears

:twisted:

Great, great shot.

:headbang:
 
That was my exact impression as well. Looks not only LPish but low-topped; that can't be more than 30,000 feet. And I agree, the anvil doesn't look like it's a part of the storm.
_________________
SA

I don’t know man. The way I am looking at it is there seems to be two developing towers in front of the main updraft which connects to the anvil and also producing the tornado. The reason I say that is because the flanking line is in the very back (or left side of the photo). If you look right above the front tower you can get a glimpse of the main updraft and the flanking line that follows it. That’s my take at least.

Mick
 
I love this photo ... for me, I think it is tied with Eric Helgeson's photo of the supercell at sunset near Rapid City, SD - and with Mike H's June 13th Alvo, NE photos.

I think it may just be the angle we are looking at the photo, Mickey ... looks to me like the flanking line is oriented at an angle moving away from the primary updraft tower. It's possible there could be a better developed precip core on the other side of the tor ... but to me it still looks like a single primary updraft tower that is LPish in nature. Interesting observation, though - wonderful photo.
 
As I recall (I chased with Jeff S. on June 10th), there really wasn't much of a flanking line with this particular storm (although there were pseudo banding structures which led into the storm but did not extend very far from the storm).

I think in this pic you are only seeing one half of the updraft...the rest of the updraft is hidden in the precipitation/anvil. The storms this day were incredibly explosive...a storm to the WNW of this storm had an overshooting top 7-10 kft above the tropopause, so this storm was definitely not a mini-supe.

Also, I think the anvil in this pic does indeed belong to this storm. As mentioned above, the storm was extremely exlplosive. I believe what can be seen in the picture is part of the backsheared portion of the anvil.

Gabe
 
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