NEXRAD supercell imagery request

I need to do a public presentation on supercell structure and I'm looking for a NEXRAD screen capture of classic or HP cell. Anyone aware of public domain imagery of this type?
 
You may be looking for something entirely different than what I will provide below, but here is a base reflectivity NEXRAD image of a classic supercell (May 3, 1999) that's about as textbook as they get:

dcd93a8cb8f0dc2a80650bd703df77fa.gif

Here's is the corresponding storm relative velocity mode image of this same storm:

65ca3dcb61635d00513e5c3ded7d87c7.gif

If you need something different, I have tons of saved radar images here from various dates I'd be happy to share with you. Just let me know.

-George
 
Here's another one of the same cell, that is larger, but with a bit less definition:

8f7c41676378ca39acbf304b4da2a0ad.jpg

Sigh, well, it was larger. Much larger. That is until photobucket resized it to fit on their page. I guess I could always email you the fullsize version if need be, as I still have it saved to my hard drive.

-George
 
Originally posted by John Cameron
Those are wonderful George, thank you!


(((resisting temptation to ask for squall line imagery))) :wink:

Gimme just a moment! I'll go digging and see what I find. Hehe.

Ok, here we go. May 18, 1995 bow echo over Pulaski County, KY:

243933ec40ae6f37d3493e23515aaea1.gif

4dcf15f8617bd84d1fec051c28be7a97.gif

PA Squally

c1e6cd9b68fbe0feb36aea204d3cdba4.gif

MI Squally:

187a95cc1b29045fc23ccff92f6a6c26.gif

I wish I had some better examples than these, but it was all I could find.

-George
 
Originally posted by George Tincher


Here's is the corresponding storm relative velocity mode image of this same storm:

65ca3dcb61635d00513e5c3ded7d87c7.gif

-George

George, is there a public source for those realtime velocity images?

TY

-Greg
 
Greg,

I wish there was. But I located both of those May 3 images long after the event itself was over. But they do look nice don't they?

-George
 
We'll see if this animates as expected...
EDIT: This animated GIF was slowing things down, so click the link below to see it...
http://www.tornadocentral.com/now/okcsupercell.gif
May 9th, 2004 -- OKC Cyclic tornadic supercell (one of the most impressive radar presentations of the cyclic nature of a supercell that I have ever seen).

Here's another radar snapshot of it:
[Broken External Image]:http://www.tornadocentral.com/now/okcsupercell2.png

[Broken External Image]:http://www.tornadocentral.com/now/okcsupercell3.png

Here's one from 3-17-03 near Hobart OK:
[Broken External Image]:http://www.tornadocentral.com/now/hobartsupercell.png
 
I created a cross section for the storm May 10 2003 (technically May 10, because it was after 0Z)...

I took this one through both of the hooks/BWER's
[Broken External Image]:http://69.14.190.10/images/May10_2003_TLX/x-section.jpg

And here is the result:
[Broken External Image]:http://69.14.190.10/images/May10_2003_TLX/x-section1.jpg

Notice the BWER on the west (the right) appears to be just forming, while the one to the east is well developed (this later collapses and the one on the left becomes dominant - See below).
http://69.14.190.10/images/May10_2003_TLX/...on_bwer_rhi.jpg

Then, you can finally see the nice tilt to the storm
http://69.14.190.10/images/May10_2003_TLX/..._high_ref_x.jpg
 
there's a classic radar capture showing a severe squall that stretches from Texas to Kansas. I saw it in a NWS presentation yesterday, but I cant find it anywhere on the net.
 
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