Making DVDs

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I'm working on my 2001-2004 highlights movie. My video is going to be in excess of at least 7 GB. I was wondering how you guys go about putting your video on DVD. I'll be getting a DVD burner for my birthday (1-23). The approximate length of the video will be 1-2 hours. It will include video of 9 tornados, plenty of hail, wall clouds, and great structure. Also, why won't a 5gb video fit on a 160gb hard drive with nothing on it? :lol: :?:
 
Originally posted by Chris Hayes
I'm working on my 2001-2004 highlights movie. My video is going to be in excess of at least 7 GB. I was wondering how you guys go about putting your video on DVD. I'll be getting a DVD burner for my birthday (1-23). The approximate length of the video will be 1-2 hours. It will include video of 9 tornados, plenty of hail, wall clouds, and great structure. Also, why won't a 5gb video fit on a 160gb hard drive with nothing on it? :lol: :?:

What operating system are you using, and if your using windows XP, do you have your file system on that drive formated to NTSF or FAT? If it's FAT, your limited to 4 gig file size. With NTSF your limited to a 16 terabyte size or 16384 gigs.
 
Originally posted by David Drummond+--><div class='quotetop'>QUOTE(David Drummond)</div>
<!--QuoteBegin-Chris Hayes
I'm working on my 2001-2004 highlights movie. My video is going to be in excess of at least 7 GB. I was wondering how you guys go about putting your video on DVD. I'll be getting a DVD burner for my birthday (1-23). The approximate length of the video will be 1-2 hours. It will include video of 9 tornados, plenty of hail, wall clouds, and great structure. Also, why won't a 5gb video fit on a 160gb hard drive with nothing on it? :lol: :?:

What operating system are you using, and if your using windows XP, do you have your file system on that drive formated to NTSF or FAT? If it's FAT, your limited to 4 gig file size. With NTSF your limited to a 16 terabyte size or 16384 gigs.[/b]

Yes, I agree with that... It sounds like your using a FAT file system. In order to switch over to NTFS, you would have to reformat the drive, and you would have to back everything up.
 
Originally posted by Skip Talbot
Correct me if I am wrong, but can't powerquest's partition magic convert from FAT to NTFS... or is that just FAT32 to NTFS?

Hmm... I've never used that program, but doing a quick search, I can see that it does convert FAT, FAT32, NTFS, Ext2, and Ext3 file systems without losing data. I would still backup though -- Better safe than sorry.
 
Originally posted by rdewey+--><div class='quotetop'>QUOTE(rdewey)</div>
<!--QuoteBegin-Skip Talbot
Correct me if I am wrong, but can't powerquest's partition magic convert from FAT to NTFS... or is that just FAT32 to NTFS?

Hmm... I've never used that program, but doing a quick search, I can see that it does convert FAT, FAT32, NTFS, Ext2, and Ext3 file systems without losing data. I would still backup though -- Better safe than sorry.[/b]

I never heard of it myself. Honestly Skip, if your going to go to the trouble to format to NTSF, I would SERIOUSLY consider backing up what you need to keep, and doing a fresh windows install and reformat to NTSF during that time. If your gonna switch, now is the time to get a clean operating system! :wink:
 
I'm curious about the answer to the original question, too. I just now upgraded my main computer to a DVD (I have no idea why I never did this until now). I do all video editing on Shannon's iMac under iDVD/iMovie, but it would be interesting to know what it takes to do this under Windows. What to use for a capture card, what software, etc.

Tim
 
Originally posted by Tim Vasquez
I'm curious about the answer to the original question, too. I just now upgraded my main computer to a DVD (I have no idea why I never did this until now). I do all video editing on Shannon's iMac under iDVD/iMovie, but it would be interesting to know what it takes to do this under Windows. What to use for a capture card, what software, etc.

Tim

If you have a digital camera with a firewire port and have a firewire port on your computer (if you don't, firewire cards are CHEAP), that is the easiest ways to capture it in with Windows and you get digital quality, not analog as some capture cards will do with RCA inputs. Personally, my absolute favorite program thus far is Adobe Premier Pro (they have a trial download on their website you can play with). Some here have turned me on to Vegas Video as well, and I like what I see, although I haven't used it for production work yet.

I also have Pinnacle Studio which is ok, and actually a pretty good program if a person has had NO experience with editing before, but for what I do, I find it limited, althought it's great for capturing video grabs for chase accounts quick.

There are a variety of capture cards and software out there if you want to go the dedicated capture card route. I abandon those completely once I got firewire capabilities. Pinnicale has decently priced deals on card/software combos.

I've never been a mac guy, but on some video forums I read, many of the people swear by the mac as the BEST way to edit video.
 
Can't answer the DVD question though, as my first DVD production is forthcoming. Right now I am planning on using either Adobe Encore DVD or DVD Architect.
 
Ah crap, I realized my main computer doesn't have Firewire. Oh well, guess I won't be using it for DVD video. I assume Firewire is the standard these days... that's how we get the signal from the camcorder into Shannon's iMac.

Tim
 
Originally posted by Tim Vasquez
Ah crap, I realized my main computer doesn't have Firewire. Oh well, guess I won't be using it for DVD video. I assume Firewire is the standard these days... that's how we get the signal from the camcorder into Shannon's iMac.

Tim

Tim,
Just install a PCI Firewire card in your computer (provided you have an unused PCI slot). They only cost about $35-$40 for a good one. That is what I did so I can import my miniDV into my computer. It works great.
 
I have burned about 8 DVDs already useing Roxio easy Creator 7.
Learning a more advanced program Adobe Premere Pro 7.Thinking
about another hard drive at some point.My 120GB is now down to 95GB.
Most of the stuff i shoot are severe thunderstorms and lightning.Lack
of transportation has kept me away from the realy good stuff.Still i don't
sell vidio but its nice to watch it on DVD.
 
Tim, you can pick up a decent Firewire card at Best Buy for around $30, and if your in to Ebay, you could prob pick on up under $20. They work fine, I have a firewire PCI card on my desktop machine.

Some laptops are sorta hard to come by with firewire built in too. I looked at quite a few earlier this year before I finally found my HP with built in firewire.
 
Originally posted by Chris Hayes
I'm working on my 2001-2004 highlights movie. My video is going to be in excess of at least 7 GB. I was wondering how you guys go about putting your video on DVD. I'll be getting a DVD burner for my birthday (1-23). The approximate length of the video will be 1-2 hours. It will include video of 9 tornados, plenty of hail, wall clouds, and great structure. Also, why won't a 5gb video fit on a 160gb hard drive with nothing on it? :lol: :?:

Your confused.. others are right about the Fat 32 deal.. you need NTSF format. i recommend the same as Dave .. back up.. do clean install

Why is it 7 gb??? compress to MPEG 2
 
Originally posted by Tim Vasquez
Ah crap, I realized my main computer doesn't have Firewire. Oh well, guess I won't be using it for DVD video. I assume Firewire is the standard these days... that's how we get the signal from the camcorder into Shannon's iMac.

Tim

Firewire cards are inexpensive

OOps I didnt read far enough others answered it for me...

Heres the deal.. DV as you pull off your MINI DV tape is 13gig per hour.. with proper software you use that footage to edit with then render to MPEG 2. You can fit about 2 hrs of compressed video footage on one DVD MPEG2.. hope that helps....

VEGAS uses an MPEG 2 codec.. you can render in 16:9 or 4:3 you can render in Windows media codec as well..
 
Originally posted by Tim Vasquez
I'm curious about the answer to the original question, too. I just now upgraded my main computer to a DVD (I have no idea why I never did this until now). I do all video editing on Shannon's iMac under iDVD/iMovie, but it would be interesting to know what it takes to do this under Windows. What to use for a capture card, what software, etc.

Tim

TIM IM me Ill hook you up with your solution on the CHEAP :wink: .. What you need is VEGAS ..... It will edit etc and format everything for DVD. it really does make it simplistic and professional... all you need is a firewire port and the software.. unlike others you dotn need 5 different pieces of software and a hardware accelerator card etc.. ie. video editor, audio editor, codec, DVD burner etc, etc...
 
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