How many will be attending a spotter training class this yr

How many of you will be attending a (SKYWARN) spotter training class this year.


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Re: How many will be attending a spotter training class this

Originally posted by mikegeukes
How many of you will be attending a (SKYWARN) spotter training class this year.

Mike

I'm usually good for going to at least one per year. About a year or so ago I heard of an advanced spotter training class. I beleive there was one in either State College or Altoona here in PA, but I wasn't able to go due to work and school. Does anyone know if the NWS or anyone is planning on continuing or expanding this course? I'd love to get as much training as I could get!
 
I'm thinking about taking one in this year - been about 3 yrs since I last went to one. Hope to make it down to Garland, but I'd at least like to go to the one in Norman.
 
I am planning on it, we have two options here, go to North Platte and take it there or try to catch up with the guys from Hastings.
It depends on what the skeds look like.
 
Actually, I hope to attend several this year. One from IND, since that's where I am most of the time. One from LMK, my homeland. Hopefully, I'll also be able to make one from ILX, since I usually chase in that area.


Ben
 
Re: How many will be attending a spotter training class this

Originally posted by Dancing Through Sunday
'm usually good for going to at least one per year. About a year or so ago I heard of an advanced spotter training class. I beleive there was one in either State College or Altoona here in PA, but I wasn't able to go due to work and school. Does anyone know if the NWS or anyone is planning on continuing or expanding this course? I'd love to get as much training as I could get!

The NWS does in fact offer both the basic SKYWARN training, which you have evidently taken, as well as the Advanced training, through most of its offices. It is important, though, to point out that some offices do not differentiate between the two, offering instead a moderate level of training. I'd check the local NWS website for the latest information regarding spotter classes; and if you can't wait for some of the northern offices to post their schedules, a friendly email may offer up some answers as to whether that particular office plans to offer one, both, or a mix of the training levels.

As you can imagine, the advanced class offers more detail than the basic course in regard to identification of severe weather/thunderstorm elements, and likely some more "in-depth" meteorology in most instances. Thus, for those first starting out in spotting, it would be advisable to take at least one basic course before moving on to the advanced course, where both are offered. Of course, both types of classes are very interesting and entertaining, and you'll definitely enjoy them, as have I!
 
I'll be going to at least two, possibly three.

The Tulsa All-Day event is 13 miles form my house, the Creek County session is about 5 1/2 miles away. If I have the time and gas money, I'll also go to the one in Broken Arrow.
 
I went last year for a hurricane class ,that was the only class left they offer that I haven't been to: Basic 1, Basic 2, flash flood/ flood, winter storms & hurricane
 
Spotter Class

I'll be at the class in Chickisha, OK and the Advanced class in Norman during the Workshop. I tend to go every year whether I need it or not.




Mickey Ptak
 
Maybe the ones that said no live in an area without an active spotter program, or they can't make it due to personal situations. I am glad the number is up around 88% for those going.
 
I went to one about 3 years ago...I felt that it was a little dumbed down that what I would have liked it to be, so I really haven't gone to one since.
 
I went to my first spotter class on 3/31 in Blue Springs, MO. The crowd was about double what they were expecting. Info was not quite as technical as I expected but still informative and I had a good time. Sat next to a veteran pilot who had some interesting stories!
 
I'll be attending the advanced training program in Lawrence this weekend. Douglas Co. Emg Mgt., Jay Antle and others have a top-notch training program. Attended two years ago and got a lot out of it. Anxious for the program this year as well. I really enjoy spotter training -
 
Originally posted by Melissa Moon
I went to one about 3 years ago...I felt that it was a little dumbed down that what I would have liked it to be, so I really haven't gone to one since.

Spotter training in general is designed for people who might not normally take as active an interest in weather as a typical chaser - or who may be starting out as a community spotter, etc. - so by most chasers' standards it may seem a bit on the light side as far as the information is concerned. But even so, it's a nice opportunity to meet the NWS personnel who administer the warning process, and the emergency management folks who coordinate incoming reports, so I think it's worthwhile to go at least for those aspects. If you have an advanced-type program in your area (which I'll bet Norman does, if anywhere) - you might find out what it takes to get in on that. I think it's a positive thing to build a rapport with the people you'll be reporting to - just so they get to know you and so you can build credibility in your reports (whole other subject there!) :wink:
 
I'd really really like to go to a seminar, but all the local ones fall on days that I have class or work. Too bad there aren't any that fall on Saturdays.
 
Spotter training class

I've attended an ADVANCED spotter training course and a basic spotter training course this year. :D
 
I went, this is my 8th year of going.. haven't missed one.. some years I went to two spotter talks..
 
I have a strong interest in the warning process and thus spotter training, so I attend as many spotter training sessions from different presenters as possible. I go to keep up with the latest ideas in the different NWSFOs, get ideas and critique. This year I attended a basic and advanced class from LSX, a basic class from ILX, and one of DVN's classes.

The LSX presentation was decent, though Jim (WCM) could stand to enter more new material and video.

ILX's basic class this year was disappointingly bad, though I haven't seen the advanced class and Chris (WCM) said it was much better. Still though, the basic class didn't have much info on actual spotting, what to look for and what to do, with real-world picture and video examples, and was pretty boring. His classes have been better in the past, hopefully they'll get better again.

On the other hand, DVN's class was exceptionally good this year. NWS classes tend to not always be the most exciting classes, nor do the presenters often have a good appreciation for what it means to be a spotter and what they need to learn (or in training/presentation techniques), and it shows in the training. However, Donna (WCM) most certainly seems to have an outstanding grasp of said issues. It was the best local NWS spotter class I've ever attended.

For what's it worth, while I haven't made it to anything from LOT this year, I've heard they've made significant improvement there. That office has had perennial problems for a long time.

Scott
 
I'll second Scott's comments about the ILX basic class. We drove from Lafayette, IN to Champaign for it...not really worth the drive, but that's okay. The WCM himself seemed like a pretty bright guy, and I got to ask him about "Lincolnadoes," so that was a plus. On the other hand, the MIC from IND gave a class to the Purdue Univ. Meteorological Assn. and the county EMA. That was absolutely one of the best basic(?!) spotter classes I've attended. I was hoping to make one from IWX and LMK, but class schedules get in the way sometimes.

I highly recommend that chasers go to at least one a year, if for no other reason than to keep things fresh. And if you have the time, the IMO Skywarn operating in IWX's CWA will be putting on an advanced spotter class next year that should be very good. Last years was an all-day affair, with presentations in the morning by Dr. David Arnold (Ball State), Dr. Doswell, Chris Novy, and Sam Lashley (WFO IWX). The afternoon session included a panel discussion and great door prizes. Next year's speakers list, they tell me, is hoped to be similar to last years.


Ben
 
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