• Stormtrack's forum runs on Xenforo forum software, which will be undergoing a major update the evening of Wednesday, Feb 28th. The site may be down for a period while that update takes place.

Fresh Twist on When, Where, Why Tornadoes Strike

While Texas leads the nation with an average of 125 tornadoes every year, and Florida has more per square mile than anywhere else...

Uh, I doan theenk so! :roll:

Actually, isn't that an SPC statistic? More tornadoes per square mile: Florida Most tornadoes total: Texas Most big tornadoes F3-F5: Oklahoka
 
I think the thing with FL having more PER SQUARE MILE is because they have a LOT less square miles than OK does. So even though they have far less total and frequency of tornadoes than OK does, they also have a lot smaller area to have them in. Doesn't seem right, but I think it works out that way.
 
From 1950-1995, Florida had 8.4 tornadoes per 10,000 square miles per year. Oklahoma had 7.5. There are several things to consider here:
1) Population bias: there are (I would imagine) a lot more areas for tornadoes to hide in OK than in FL.
2) Water spouts: I believe water spouts are often included in the tornado count, maybe not.
3) Tornadoes from tropical systems. Recall that in 2004 there were a large number of tornadoes from landfalling hurricanes/TSes. Florida tends to get more tropical systems than does Oklahoma.

In the end, though, it doesn't really matter about tornado density. Would you rather chase in Florida or Oklahoma? Personally, I'd choose OK.


Ben
 
I don't think the point of the article was tornadoes per square mile... It's that the percentage of tornadoes that come from QLCS's is much higher than previously thought. No way would 10 years ago people tell you that half of Indiana's tornadoes do not come from isolated storms but squall lines!
 
Tom Grazulis states many of Florida's tornadoes are landspouts. Big difference between 8.4 landspouts per 10,000 sq miles and 7.5 supercell tornadoes per 10,000 sq mi.
 
Theres the Top 10 States. Source: Storm Data

1953-2003 Per #10,000 Sq.MI.
01. 8.88 Florida
02. 8.01 Oklahoma
03. 6.32 Kansas
04. 6.22 Iowa
05. 5.85 Illinois
06. 5.51 Indiana
07. 5.45 Mississippi
08. 5.44 Nebraska
09. 5.36 Louisiana
10. 5.05 Texas

Mike
 
If you include "supercell days" with tornado days, I believe Florida would disappear way down that list. Landfalling waterspouts skew the data as badly as NE Colorado landspouts. Of course both are technically tornadoes.

But from a chasing perspective, I don't think many folks book Orlando for the Spring chase vacations :wink:
 
But from a chasing perspective, I don't think many folks book Orlando for the Spring chase vacations :wink:

Ahhaw...Thats what I can do when I graduate. Fool people with 8.4 to 7.5 and take their money! :wink: I can finally afford to chase every storm system!!
 
Tom Grazulis states many of Florida's tornadoes are landspouts. Big difference between 8.4 landspouts per 10,000 sq miles and 7.5 supercell tornadoes per 10,000 sq mi.

Can you elaborate on what a landspout is? I've heard the term before, I've just can't remember what it means? Is it like a dust devil, or does it come out of a smaller storm?

Thanks,
Jason
 
Back
Top