Extreme weather in your area

I am currently working on a book title that deconstructs selected extreme weather events in North America and explores the forecasting aspects.

Since there are a pretty good cross-section of US and Canadians here, my question to you is what are some extreme and bizarre synoptic weather events that you remember for your location? They must be from 1960-2004, and in North America only. You can estimate a date to the nearest month.

Please avoid tornadoes and named hurricanes... I know of countless examples and can select those easily.

Some examples -- here in Texas we might think of (dates are approximate!!):
January 1, 1979 - major ice storm
June 20, 1980 - severe heat wave
Dec 20-25, 1983 - cold snap; longest recorded subfreezing spell at DFW
Jan 21, 1985 - monster 'norther'; record high pressure (30.95"/1050 mb) a week later
Jan 25, 1985 - unusual snowstorm in San Antonio
Mar 22, 1987 - very strong westerly gradient, gusts to 50 mph all day at DFW
Dec 22, 1989 - arctic icebox strikes Texas

Feel free to reminisce. What interesting weather situation do you want to see deconstructed and analyzed? If I pick your event (first mention) you'll be credited and get a free copy of the book. I'll be choosing about 20-30 examples, so your odds are good.

Tim
 
The Great Blizzard of 1978 that affected the Great Lakes
and New England January 25-27, 1978.

Grand Rapids MI recorded 16.1 inches iof snow
in 24 hours. They were drifts some 15- 25 feet
out in the country. I remember this event fondly.

NWS Detroit has a web page about this:
http://www.crh.noaa.gov/dtx/?page=stories/blizzard1978

Some other links:
http://www.crh.noaa.gov/iwx/wxpics/winter/ -North Webster IN
http://www.erh.noaa.gov/iln/PSACVG.htm -Wiilmington OH
http://www.intellicast.com/DrDewpoint/Library/1371/ -Intellicat
plus more links can be found online.

November 10, 1975: THe Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald
http://www.crh.noaa.gov/mqt/fitzgerald/fitzc.htm
http://cimss.ssec.wisc.edu/wxwise/fitz.html

Hurricane Huron: 14-SEP-96.
http://ams.allenpress.com/amsonline/?reque...ue=02&page=0223

Mike
 
November 10-11, 1995 cold blast/tornado outbreak.

If I recall, in addition to tornadoes across the Plains/Midwest, there were a number of sites that saw 24 hour temperature changes on the order of 70-80F.

A real neat synoptic setup.

Another of my favorite events was the Jan '98 ice storm across the northeast/Canada.

Hurricane Huron was a GREAT even Mike.

Evan
 
My most memorable event from when I was young and living with my parents in Minnesota, was the Halloween Storm of 1991, which lasted mainly from October 31st - November 3rd. This storm dumped over 30" of snow across portions of eastern Minnesota, with 28.4" in the Twin Cities and 36.9" in Duluth. There was also signficant ice accumulations in southeastern MN... This storm was followed by record cold too... I remember "trick-or-treat"ing that Halloween, in heavy snow and strong winds...

More info at http://climate.umn.edu/doc/journal/top5/nu...numberthree.htm
 
The major event I can think of from when I lived in CA is the record cold snap from Dec 21-31, 1990. Another one is the Dec 12, 1995 storm that had a central pressure of 953mb and produced hurricane force gusts across northern CA, western OR, and western WA.
 
I agree with the Blizzard of 1978, which affected all of MI/IN/OH, and had the lowest pressure recorded for many sites - A whopping ~955mb, which is very rare for an inland system...

The Blizzard of 1999 (January) was also one of the biggest to strike the Midwest/Great Lakes (Chicago), and would be another good event.
 
I remember that 1999 blizzard. My HS was the only one in town where school wasn't canceled. They finally decided to let us go when the busses almost couldn't make it.
 
I am surprised I thought of this with all thats been going on here in FL this past week, but this is something that been with me since I was a kid.

January 19, 1977 - The day it snowed in MIAMI, Florida.

I remember waking up and looking outside wondering why the grass turned white. When I got to school, the teachers let the kids out to see what was going on, but it was so cold we would run out and head back in.
 
November 10th, 1998. A huge low pressure "bombed" out across the upper midwest. The surface pressure dropped to 962.8mb in Albert Lea MN. VERY hight gradient winds blew for over 24 hours across the region. A non thunderstorm wind gust (gradient) of 93mph was recorded in LaCrosse Wisconsin. 95mph winds in Mackinac Island Michigan. Very high winds moved into the northeast the following day.

Sioux Falls SD also received over a foot of snow that day along with the winds.


I remember that day very clearly. I've never seen such powerful winds last so long. Some very large trees were uprooted in my neighborhood, many of which had sustained all previous severe thunderstorm winds. I'll never forget that day and way the low pressure bombed out....
 
November 10th, 1998. A huge low pressure "bombed" out across the upper midwest. The surface pressure dropped to 962.8mb in Albert Lea MN. VERY hight gradient winds blew for over 24 hours across the region. A non thunderstorm wind gust (gradient) of 93mph was recorded in LaCrosse Wisconsin. 95mph winds in Mackinac Island Michigan. Very high winds moved into the northeast the following day.

Sioux Falls SD also received over a foot of snow that day along with the winds.


I remember that day very clearly. I've never seen such powerful winds last so long. Some very large trees were uprooted in my neighborhood, many of which had sustained all previous severe thunderstorm winds. I'll never forget that day and way the low pressure bombed out....

Oh yea, thats another good event! Had to do some pretty good cleanup in the yard after that event - Had a few wind gusts to 60-70mph on my anemometer. Its also classified as November Gale, which are storms that tend to bomb out near or over Lake Superior in November, with hurricane-like effects. I believe wave heights on Lake Superior max out to 25FT on some of these events (I don't think waves can get much higher on Superior due to its size...
 
Oh yea, thats another good event! Had to do some pretty good cleanup in the yard after that event - Had a few wind gusts to 60-70mph on my anemometer. Its also classified as November Gale, which are storms that tend to bomb out near or over Lake Superior in November, with hurricane-like effects. I believe wave heights on Lake Superior max out to 25FT on some of these events (I don't think waves can get much higher on Superior due to its size...


It's funny how this event occurred on the anniversary of the Edmund Fitzgerald storm.

This was a true "witch of november" storm...
 
A couple come to mind:
The blizzard of 1993 (March 12- 13, 1993)...also known as the Storm of the Century, I think. East TN was paralysed by up to 2' of snow (my first thundersnow experience :) )
Record low temp of -24F in Knoxville, TN...think the date was Jan 18, 1985.
Angie
 
Originally posted by Jeff Snyder
My most memorable event from when I was young and living with my parents in Minnesota, was the Halloween Storm of 1991, which lasted mainly from October 31st - November 3rd. This storm dumped over 30\" of snow across portions of eastern Minnesota, with 28.4\" in the Twin Cities and 36.9\" in Duluth. There was also signficant ice accumulations in southeastern MN... This storm was followed by record cold too... I remember \"trick-or-treat\"ing that Halloween, in heavy snow and strong winds...

More info athttp://climate.umn.edu/doc/journal/top5/numberthree.htm

This wasn't part of the "perfect storm," was it? It's the same date.
 
The 2 that come to my mind is Amarillo, Tx (June 21,2004) hailstorm that dessimated the west side of the city and cost $100 million. hail to grapefriuit and larger actually went through some roofs into living rooms.

and

Canyon, Tx Flood (May 26, 1978)
10 inches rain in 90 minutes, 4 deaths, 15 injured, 123 homes damaged.
I cant imagine what it would be like to be in a storm that dropped that much rain that fast. That is a rate of 6.5 inches an hour.

Since it is limited to 1960 or newer I wont submit but will mention the march '57 blizzard when the panhandle had 30ft snow drifts!! ( this is texas after all)
 
You know, I hate it when someone says "from when I was young" and then posts the date 1991.

Anyhow.

The true Perfect Storm - the Columbus Day storm, Oct 12, 1962 - Corvallis, OR had a 127mph gust 60 miles inland, Newport, OR on the coast at the coast guard station the anemometer pegged out at 138mph for 5 minutes and then blew away, and at Cape Blanco on the Oregon coast, NWS estimates sustained winds of 150mph and gusts to 179mph - it felled 11.2 billion board feet of timber and killed people from California to British Columbia - and it was not a hurricane - it was a mid-latitudes low pressure area.

http://oregonstate.edu/~readw/October1962.html


The 1972 Portland-Vancouver tornado that killed 6.

The 1948 Floods that wiped out the entire town of Vanport, on the Columbia River. 25 people killed and a city of 20,000 gone.

1903 Flash Flood at Heppner in NE Oregon, 247 people killed.

December 1964/Jan 1965 Floods in the Willamette Valley - 17 people died, and virtually every river in the state was well over flood stage.

The extreme cold event of Feb 1933: A cold outbreak brought a surge of Arctic air into the state. The city of Seneca, in northeast Oregon, recorded the state's all-time record low temperature of -54 degrees F. The next day it was nearly 100 degrees warmer when the high reached 45 degrees.

The January 1950 snowstorms - A series of three snow storms and cold air the entire month ended up giving most inland areas over 4 feet of snow, and some mountainous areas over 20ft. Most highways west of the Cascade mountains were closed.
 
Plains snowstorm Friday-Sunday, Oct. 24-26, 1997 which left most of Omaha without power for 10 days and killed 9. If I recall right it was really warm that day and then that night we got a TON of snow. I'll never forget that storm as it was my first time seeing thundersnow.
 
Originally posted by Jay McCoy
The 2 that come to my mind is Amarillo, Tx (June 21,2004) hailstorm that dessimated the west side of the city and cost $100 million. hail to grapefriuit and larger actually went through some roofs into living rooms.

Many of those people with home damage along Hollywood Rd are just now getting their roofs and windows repaired/replaced! The hail went through the metal roofing of several barns and that church, as well. I am so glad that missed our place, or we would have probably had some dead horses. :(
 
Did not happen in my area, and no one mention it yet.
were these these famous events.

-May 05 1995 Fort Worh (Mayfest) Hailstorm
-The Great USA Flood of 1993
-July 31, 1976 Big Thompson Canyon Colorado Flash Flood
-The Chicago Heat Wave
-The Record Breaking Hail in Aurora NE

Also I remember the Drought and Heat Wave of 1988,
that affected most of the Midwest.
Last time Grand Rapids made it to 100 degrees.

Mike
 
MAY 30-31, 1998 DERECHO: The Great Southern Great Lakes Derecho of 1998

I do remember the derecho May 31, I met the derecho at Lake Michigan,
recorded 92 mph winds, my anemometer blew off the roof of my
truck, was not mounted too well, also had a pop-up camper of
mine destroyed by the derecho.

http://www.spc.noaa.gov/misc/AbtDerechos/C...-311998Page.htm
http://cimss.ssec.wisc.edu/smrwkshp/1998/case/
http://www.crh.noaa.gov/dtx/may31.htm
http://www.crh.noaa.gov/techa/ta0/tech0001/00-01.html
http://ams.confex.com/ams/Sept2000/20SLS/a...racts/16158.htm
http://www.crh.noaa.gov/mpx/science/derechostudy.html

NWS Grand Rapids used to have a write-up and radar images. on their site
Thankfully somebody saved the information on their site.
http://www.nrnilstormlab.com/derecho.gif
http://www.nrnilstormlab.com/53198grrwriteup.html
http://www.nrnilstormlab.com/53198pis.html

Mike
 
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