All those acronyms for forecasting tools!

What does "GFS" stand for?
And "NCAR"?
And any other important acronyms for Wx forecasting tools that come to mind?
 
GFS = Global Forecast System (Model)
NAM = North American Mesoscale (Model)
Eta = NOT AN ACRONYM! Now known as the NAM, the ETA draws it's name from the fact that it uses Eta coordinates
NGM = Nested Grid Model
RUC = Rapid Update Cycle (Model)

NCAR = National Center for Atmospheric Research
UCAR = University Corporation for Atmospheric Research

CAPE = Convective Available Potential Energy
SBCAPE = Surface-Based CAPE
MLCAPE = Mean-Layer or Mixed-Layer CAPE
MUCAPE = Most Unstable CAPE
SRH = Storm-Relative Helicity
UVV = Upward Vertical Velocity

FFD = Front-Flank Downdraft
RFD = Rear-Flank Downdraft
OFB = OutFlow Boundary
WF = Warm Front
CF = Cold Front
DL = DryLine
 
Thanks, all! You've helped clear up a few mysteries. I know most of the commonly used acronyms, but some of them have continued to stump me: GFS, CONUS, AOB, NCAR...nice to finally know what they stand for, since they're used all the time in the discussions.
 
Checked all the lists, and couldn't find a definition for "ETVS" (related, I assume to TVS. I'm asking because I'm looking at GR Level 3 animations of the storms in Western NE tonight, and there are several cells (solid pink triangles) labled TVS, but one hollow pink triangle rated ETVS. Is E for Estimated?
 
Checked all the lists, and couldn't find a definition for "ETVS" (related, I assume to TVS. I'm asking because I'm looking at GR Level 3 animations of the storms in Western NE tonight, and there are several cells (solid pink triangles) labled TVS, but one hollow pink triangle rated ETVS. Is E for Estimated?

Elevated ...

From Build 10 documentation ... "An Elevated Tornadic Vortex Signature, Elevated TVS or ETVS, is defined as a 3-D circulation with a base above the 0.5º slice and above 600 meters ARL. The depth of the circulation must be at least 1.5 km. Additionally, the delta velocity at the base of the circulation must be at least 25 m/s."
 
Remember that there is a reason why you don't see a lot of documentation on ETVS. It's rarely (if ever) used. Heads more learned than mine can explain the intricate details, but essentially it's not used.

John
 
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