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6/22/2006 REPORTS: IL / IN / OH

Edited report.. added photos and additional information.


We chased West of Lima when we noticed that the storm in front of the line had developed rotation and was tor warned. We headed west on RT 30 while the storm was still in IN heading straight east at 50 MPH. The NOAA computer voice makes 15 and 50 sound the same but I believe he was saying 50MPH.

By the time we hit the town of Delphos the storm was directly in front of us but we believed we could get south of it. So we turned south. This storm was riding out directly in front of a serious line of storms so even if we avoided the worst of this one we were likely going to get into some nasty weather.

Looking at the storm report from the NWS damage survey Damage Survey , this storm had already produced two brief and minor tornadoes.

AN F0 TORNADO WITH WINDS UP TO 72 MPH OCCURRED 2 MILES EAST OF
WILLSHIRE IN SOUTHWEST VAN WERT COUNTY NEAR THE INTERSECTION OF
HARRISON WILLSHIRE ROAD AND ROUTE 81.[/b]


AN F1 TORNADO WITH WINDS OF 73 TO 112 MPH OCCURRED 5 MILES EAST OF
THE TOWN OF WILLSHIRE IN SOUTHWEST VAN WERT COUNTY... NEAR THE
INTERSECTION OF ROUTE 81 AND GLENMORE ROAD.[/b]


Well, so we were on a good storm but we had to stop in Delphos to figure out our position. This storm was a bit messy but it looked like the tornadic part was to our southwest a bit. Directly overhead looked good also. Directly over head with a fast mover like this was good because at the speed that this was moving we could easilly fall in behind and chase safely.

We decided that main inflow was to our southwest and although there was rain it did seem to have a lowering and some messy undefined activity but nonetheless interesting action in that area. So we hauled south on OH Route 66 to get south of that.

What we were probably seeing through the rain was more or less the activity that caused this report from the damage survey.

AN F0 TORNADO WITH WINDS UP TO 72 MPH OCCURRED 4 MILES SOUTHWEST OF
DELPHOS IN EASTERN VAN WERT COUNTY NEAR THE INTERSECTION OF CONVERSE
ROAD AND LANDECK ROAD. [/b]

We hit Landeck road and were due east of the above reported tornado when we started getting pounded by rain and wind. Realizing that we were not going to make it south of the action area although we were very close in retrospect, we bailed and tried to buy some time by heading east.

We drove east on Bockey road and things were looking bad, trees coming down, very high winds. We passed a solid brick house and contemplated seeking shelter. We drove a few 100 yards further saw that the road ended and South or North would be our only options. So we turned around and sought shelter.

We woke the owner of the house up, she later thanked us. She was sleeping and unaware of the danger. We told her that there was likely a tornado in the area and asked for shelter. The porch was on the "good side" protected from the wind. Let her know that we would ask to come in if things got ugly. We parked the car away from any potential falling trees.

We rode the storm out on her front porch.

We witnessed strong winds that mostly came from the north and sometimes the west. Took some still photos but it does not really show the wind very well. She had two big old trees in the yard. I figured when those went down we would go inside.

webPorchtree.jpg


Well the trees never came down and once things died down we thanked our host and headed out.

Looking at the damage report we were 5 miles due east of what they considered a tornado by NWS assessment of the damage. All the winds we got were mostly unidirectional. It turns out that we would have been safe enough in the car but due to poor visibility and the conditions I am glad that we took shelter when a good oportunity presented itself. Better safe than sorry.


Once that was passed we headed to Lima for data.

Lima unfortunately was trashed. Trees down everywhere.

webLimaTree.jpg


Our hotel was in the path of the worst of what appear to have been straight line winds. This meant no data for us. This was the hotel we had spent the night before in.

webhotel.jpg


So we headed South on I75 to see if some tail end storms might still have some energy to them.

All in all a fun day. We got a little too close perhaps but we made a good choice to abandon the vehicle without panic and while things were still reasonable. I am thankful that we had a farmhouse and a porch because that made the choice to abandon the vehicle that much easier. As for being that close to the tornadoes and missing them. I really do not think that any "tornadoes" in that storm were very picturesque. Shortlived, extremely rain wrapped, not much to look at.



--
Tom Hanlon
 
My earliest chase yet.. was on the road by 8 am to intercept the morning cluster of storms pushing out of Iowa. I intercepted the intense storm that produced the tornado in Tazewell County, IL. Unfortunately I intercepted it about 45 minutes after the tornado lifted. Structure was very impressive, but was kind of anti-climatic. The way it looked I thought I was going to get rocked, but winds never really gusted above 40-50 mph at my location and there was no hail to speak of. Granted, there were some severe wind reports to my south a bit so I probably didnt go through the most intense part of the core but I still hoped for a little more. Some shots from near the McLean and Livingston County borders from around 9 am.

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Found myself back in Remington, IN today watching with intent as the cell from Tazewell Co, ILL was coming my way. As soon as it crossed the state line it made a hard right turn straight for home! I quickly took off west twards Goodland, IN where I made a report to 911(as I had no other ways to report it) about a lowering wall cloud with rotation. I sprinted south into Fowler, IN where I got infront of the storm. I got pelted with nickle size hail coming back home into Tippecanoe Co, IN. Winds of 50MPH were reported as well as a great lightning show.
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I lucked out early in the day when the storms built just to my west in a hell of a hurry and then blasted through on their way to Ohio. Still have hail in my freezer from this one. May have to have some ice water later(with hail), there's a first. Anyways the storms were great and very interesting later in the day with a squall line like shelf cloud that was nearly stationary for 30-40 minutes and flooded all counties south of Fountain in West Central Indiana. Very neat storms, I'm satisfied for now.

Pictures: 1-5 are of Late afternoon shelf cloud

Others are of this morning
 
june22a.jpg


june22f.jpg


june22wv7.jpg


june22wv11.jpg


Patterns like these can be hazardous to your sleep. The one thing about 2006 is that while tornadoes have been hard to come by, lightning has been more active and much more cooperative than usual.
My brother and I once again spent all night in downtown Pittsburgh, starting off the June 22 lightning marathon. We arrived home from the first round of storms after 5AM. After a few hours sleep, I went into town for a third storm over the city (so far this week) this time in the afternoon. Immediatly headed south to catch a few more storms on the way home to Charleston, WV along I-79. Most were on the decrease with monster shelf clouds. I opted to forego shelf cloud shots in order to jump on the next cells down the line. Got one good cell in Clarksburg that showered down close CGs across 180 degrees of the horizon. With two cameras facing different directions was able to snag a few of them. Stopped one more time near Weston to get slides of a nice shelf moving in, backlit by lightning. The last round of cells beat me home to Charleston, but ended up fizzling right as we both (the storms and I) arrived in town.

Some frame grabs are here:

http://wvlightning.com/june222006.shtml
 
I didnt chase on this day, I just watched the storm from my back patio. The county I live in, Stark County appears to have had it's first killer tornado. I said appears because I'm not sure if the fatality was from the tornado or straight line winds the storm produced. I'm thinking it was in the tornado's path. A bow echo approached from the west early in the evening. Just befor reaching our county, the storm that would hit our county became fairly isolated and began to strengthen. It produced it's first tornado in Holmes County to my SW where it damaged and destroyed several homes. It produced a second F1 tornado to the SW of me in my county. Hundreds of trees are down dozens of buildings in the path of the tornado and across the southenr part of the county are damaged or destroyed. 1 person was killed after a tree fell on the tent he was in. :( County has been declared a disaster area. Gonna go for a drive later and check out the damage now that roads are being reopened.
 
Just read that the tornado that hit Holmes county was an F2. At least 6 tornados hit Ohio on the 22nd. 5 F0 and F1s, and 1 F2. Cleveland NWS has yet to issue a statement on the tornados that hit Stark and Holmes county.
 
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