Tropical Cyclone (Hurricane)-spawned tornadoes

Bobby Little

Supporter
Mar 18, 2013
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eagle, michigan
Not sure if this post belongs here or moved to intro weather. Mods make that decision.
Looking for Experienced chasers to elaborate on this topic. Chasing techniques and tendencies when looking to chase tornados that spawn from Cyclone Hurricanes making landfall. Many spin out multiple tornados. Do you have experiences? How do you like to plan your chase?
 
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Reactions: rdale
Aug 9, 2012
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Galesburg, IL
www.facebook.com
Yeah tornadoes from tropical cyclones tend to be very heavily rainwrapped and can form out of otherwise benign features. Good example was Hurricane Isaac remnants. I chased that day in IL and there ended up being 7 tornadoes in North Central IL, none of which I could see due to haze and heavy rainwrapping. I can imagine even further south, closer to landfall, this being an even more impossible feat.
 
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Reactions: William Spencer
May 31, 2018
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Richmond Virginia
Yeah tornadoes from tropical cyclones tend to be very heavily rainwrapped and can form out of otherwise benign features. Good example was Hurricane Isaac remnants. I chased that day in IL and there ended up being 7 tornadoes in North Central IL, none of which I could see due to haze and heavy rainwrapping. I can imagine even further south, closer to landfall, this being an even more impossible feat.
I can second this after experiencing tropical tornadoes last September with Florence in Richmond. Unpredictable, relatively short lived, and it can be very difficult to find defining features without luck and good positioning
 

Dan Robinson

Staff member
Jan 14, 2011
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St. Louis
stormhighway.com
It depends - if a nice dry slot works in and the overall definition of the cyclone/wind fields stays intact, supercells and tornadoes can be quite classic and chaseable. Storm structure is low-topped and a little similar to cold-core. As a general rule, I always chase any remnant system that makes it into the Midwest as long as it's not been completely absorbed into a trough/cold front.