This guy's take on Skywarn

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Joey Ketcham

Can you post a link to the same article from a source other than the one you posted which would require me to pay $13 just to read it?
 
Feb 9, 2007
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Illinois
skywarnforum.com
I can read it just fine. As for posting its contents, I don't want to get ST in trouble if indeed you have to pay for it. But as Mike says, you are not missing much, just some guy showing how humans are going down in evolution ;)
 
Feb 20, 2014
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Fort Myers, FL
Shawn,

For starters, I do apologize for the thread bump, but for those who weren't able to read it....I found the full article posted here.

http://www.freenewspos.com/news/article/b/121802/today/nestor-ramos-weather-obsessed-your-county-needs-you

Unfortunately, I had some friends who I no longer talk to since they found out I went to a SKYWARN Storm Spotter class last year. They feel it's a waste of time and that's why there are radars to do the storm tracking for us. Oh boy.....what they don't understand.

Happy Storm Chasing!

Jason M. Perretta | KD4HML
Fort Myers, FL
 
Aug 16, 2009
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Amarillo, TX
You pushed your friends away because they don't see the value of Skywarn? That's a little extreme, don't ya think?
Well if someone doesn't understand the values of SKYWARN, then they are no friends of mine.

This also applies to friends who don't want to dance the Safety Dance.
 

Rob H

EF5
Mar 11, 2009
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Twin Cities, MN
"Having known a few weather nerds, I think the time might be better spent on teaching social skills."

While I don't disagree that most weather nerds are socially inept, I think the author's time might be better spent learning how to write articles that aren't pointless, rambling wastes of my time.
 

calvinkaskey

Guest
Feb 17, 2014
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I think spotter training is in the dark ages along with visual analysis of "tornadic" thunderstorms. I just talked with NWS personnel in North Carolina. I took some video of something I didn't know what it was. It looked like a meso. Looking back at it there is what I would call ribbing of the clouds high up in it. From earlier in the day that showed strong parallel movement along the rib axis. In the middle just below the "ribbing" is a cloud attached to the "meso" that increasing looks like a funnel with a well defined darker funnel shape. At the same time is a funnel shape right in the middle of the "meso" that is bigger and more persistent. Both of these funnel shaped clouds disappear after the "ribbing" disintegrates. This Meso looking cloud just happens to be at the southern edge of a dying thunderstorm. Oh there also is what appears to be a very well defined collar cloud around the "meso". I'm sorry but if it looks like a duck, quacks like a duck and lives in a pond I'm calling it a duck. Not only is the cloud located in a southern extremity, there was not really any rain to speak of and the air conditions were favorable for tornadic development as there was a tornado watch at the time. Oh the edges of the meso were fairly well defined also.
 
Dec 13, 2003
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La Plata, Maryland
Even today with the ability to issue tornado warnings from doppler indicated rotation, I still believe we need trained people on the ground to say 'yes there is a tornado on the ground.' One reason as I said in another thread, people (around here anyway) do not take doppler indicated tornado warnings seriously. They treat it more like a watch... if even that! If people hear the newscaster say a tornado has been spotted on the ground by spotters they will act.
 
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Rob H

EF5
Mar 11, 2009
825
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Twin Cities, MN
I think spotter training is in the dark ages along with visual analysis of "tornadic" thunderstorms. I just talked with NWS personnel in North Carolina. I took some video of something I didn't know what it was. It looked like a meso. Looking back at it there is what I would call ribbing of the clouds high up in it. From earlier in the day that showed strong parallel movement along the rib axis. In the middle just below the "ribbing" is a cloud attached to the "meso" that increasing looks like a funnel with a well defined darker funnel shape. At the same time is a funnel shape right in the middle of the "meso" that is bigger and more persistent. Both of these funnel shaped clouds disappear after the "ribbing" disintegrates. This Meso looking cloud just happens to be at the southern edge of a dying thunderstorm. Oh there also is what appears to be a very well defined collar cloud around the "meso". I'm sorry but if it looks like a duck, quacks like a duck and lives in a pond I'm calling it a duck. Not only is the cloud located in a southern extremity, there was not really any rain to speak of and the air conditions were favorable for tornadic development as there was a tornado watch at the time. Oh the edges of the meso were fairly well defined also.
You should upload this video to YouTube so we can analyze it is as well. It sounds like a fascinating event!
 
Mar 23, 2009
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Ypsilanti, MI
"Having known a few weather nerds, I think the time might be better spent on teaching social skills."

While I don't disagree that most weather nerds are socially inept, I think the author's time might be better spent learning how to write articles that aren't pointless, rambling wastes of my time.
Our erstwhile author isn't showing many social skills in writing a derisive article that gives no facts to back up any assertions, either. :) Some of us find that intellectually insulting.