So I assume these signatures are enough to call this a tornado?

sam.leisenring

Enthusiast
Apr 14, 2019
6
1
1
Rochester, NY
I'm sorry if this is a really dumb question but i'm not very experienced with this stuff. But by my judgement this appears to be a very big tornado based on the visible debris ball on base reflectivity and on CC and then the giant velocity couplet. The warning on this storm sayid that a tornado was confirmed by weather spotters, but I was just wondering if the NWS would be confident in calling this a tornado if there wasn't any visual on the ground.

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K. Gentry

EF0
Apr 12, 2019
23
16
1
NC
... by my judgement this appears to be a very big tornado based on the visible debris ball on base reflectivity and on CC and then the giant velocity couplet. The warning on this storm said that a tornado was confirmed by weather spotters, but I was just wondering if the NWS would be confident in calling this a tornado if there wasn't any visual on the ground.
Yeah. Here's a link of google results that show warnings with "radar confirmed tornado" in the text, on weather.gov. You can see it's not all that uncommon that they do that. CC can secure most confidence, and it's icing on the cake that the scan is so close to the ground (~500-700ft).

The Warning Decision Training Branch has some fairly in-depth tutorials regarding this, uploaded for anyone to watch:
- WTDB: Warning Operations Course - Severe Track

* Check the 'Tornado Warning Guidance Lessons' under "Tornado Curriculum." I need to do the same. This is enlightening stuff.