Possible impact of 5G cell service on weather forecasting

Jun 4, 2018
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San Angelo, TX
So I stumbled across a YouTube video discussing the possibility of some of the new 5G frequencies being uncomfortably close to the 23.8 ghz used by weather satellites to detect water vapor. The issue seems to be bleed over from the 5G signals (especially 24.25 ghz) essentially confusing the satellite, which then pumps out less accurate data, which is then fed into weather models and so on down the line until our weather forecast accuracy is close to what it was back in the 80s. I did some research on my own and found a few articles from CBS news, nature.com, the guardian, etc. I'll link the video and a couple of the articles, but more info is just a quick Google search away.

What are ya'll's thoughts? I am by no means an expert in any of the fields involved, but if true, it certainly seems like it could create issues.

YouTube video

Articles
CBS News: Meteorologists fear 5G network could take forecasting back to the 1980s

Nature.com: Global 5G wireless networks threaten weather forecasts

The Guardian: 5G signal could jam satellites that help with weather forecasting
 
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James K

EF2
Mar 26, 2019
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Colorado
If true, it seems like a pretty bad idea to use those frequencies...but we all know it comes down to money...more spectrum means more money.

The articles were an interesting read none the less...and I learned just a little bit about how weather satellites work.
 

MClarkson

EF5
Sep 2, 2004
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Blacksburg, VA
Perhaps I am not entirely clear on how it works, but if the all the new 5G spectrum transmitters are using the same frequency... couldnt we use the occultation of those transmissions to determine WV content?
 

rdale

EF5
Mar 1, 2004
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Lansing, MI
skywatch.org
The current satellites observe water vapor passively - so no instrument now (or in the next 5-10+ years) would be capable. Not knowing the specifics, but maybe in a decade or more if it's technologically possible?
 
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