Out of place outbreaks, ie northeast, middle atlantic, rockies westward

Discussion in 'Historical weather events' started by calvinkaskey, Mar 9, 2015.

  1. calvinkaskey

    calvinkaskey Guest

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    According to http://www.tornadohistoryproject.com/tornado/New-York/1983/5/2/table an outbreak that occurred in New York state that had just 6 tornadoes but all 6 were F-3's. Usually not many F-3s or higher in New York This seems pretty wierd. Pennsylvania had 2 F-2s with one traveling 10 miles and an f0. Pa's tornadoes were only about 30 yds wide and the 7 in Ohio on that day weren't wider than 100 yds. All the tornadoes in N.Y. were 150yds or wider. Three tornadoes in New York also had path lengths of 15 or more miles.
     
  2. StephenHenry

    StephenHenry Member

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  3. Andy Berrington

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    5/31/1985, 6/9/1953, 7/31/1987 (Edmonton, AB F4 tornado) and 6/23/1944 come to mind the most when thinking about "out-of-place" major tornado events.

    I'd throw the Portland/Vancouver tornado from 4/5/1972 (along with other tornadoes from that day) in there as well.

    http://www.tornadohistoryproject.com/tornado/1972/4/5/map
     
  4. Stephen Szulborski

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    This event also had a F3 that hit northeast of Detroit and a F4 that hit just southeast of Sarnia Ontario.
     
  5. Shawn Schuman

    Shawn Schuman Member

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    To me, May 31, 1985 is the mother of all "out of place" outbreaks. Just an extraordinarily violent outbreak which produced nine violent tornadoes across the Great Lakes region, including an extremely violent F5, a 2.2 mile wide long-track F4 and two F4s in Canada. The June 23, 1944 "Appalachians Outbreak" was pretty extraordinary as well, producing a string of significant tornadoes through Ohio, Pennsylvania, West Virginia and Maryland. This includes the near-F5 Shinnston, WV tornado which unfortunately killed more than 100 people.

    If you expand the criteria for "out of place," I'd put my money on June 8-9, 1953. An extremely intense, widespread outbreak which is most famous (or infamous, as it were) for producing the Flint, MI and Worcester, MA tornadoes. You can read my blog post on this event if you're curious: https://stormstalker.wordpress.com/2013/09/05/flint-worcester-outbreak/

    I also made a map that I believe to be the most accurate I've seen of the event; the tornadoes were not especially well documented, so most of the maps I've seen either have missing tornadoes, multiple tornadoes combined into one, weird tracks, etc. I can't guarantee it's 100% accurate, but I spent a lot of time researching it.

    https://www.google.com/maps/d/edit?mid=z0Kbb3dsgNdE.k68g_yRxmZuE
    (ETA: If you click the little star icon for each tornado path, it'll give you the details for each tor.)

    The final count was 245+ casualties and six violent tornadoes, including one F5 in Flint. I actually believe that several of the other F4s could potentially have been rated F5, though it'd be impossible now to prove conclusively.

    The Tri-State tornado and associated outbreak (several other extremely violent tornadoes occurred that day as well) would certainly be on the list as well, except that I'm not sure I'd consider MO/IL/IN/KY/TN "out of place."

    There have been a number of other very significant outbreaks in odd places; I'll add more soon when I have the time.
     
    #5 Shawn Schuman, Mar 11, 2015
    Last edited: Mar 11, 2015
  6. Elaine Spencer

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    Not sure how "out of place" this would be, but note the number of tornado reports north of the NC-VA border in this map of 4/27/11:

    http://www.spc.noaa.gov/climo/reports/110427_rpts.html

    At least 2 tornadoes in NY and one in PA reached EF-2 intensity; some in VA reached EF-3 and caused fatalities.

    On any other day, those reports in and of themselves would have constituted a significant outbreak; but that day, of course, they were overshadowed by the outbreak taking place farther south.
     
  7. Jason Foster

    Jason Foster Member

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    Yes, was that the day the decent sized tornado hit the Raliegh-Durham area? I remember chasing I think a High Risk (or a Moderate Risk) set up with @Mark Ellinwood. We managed to be on the storms that day pretty good but only managed to film a funnel and some large hail (on the ground, not in it). It was part of an "outbreak" if I remember right.


    Another significant Mid-Atlantic outbreak is the Hurricane Ivan (Sept. 2004) remnants that hit the DC area and spawned a bunch of tornadoes. Oddly, I just moved from DC to Florida (in part because of the busy hurricane season). I don't have a link for that but a simple internet search probably has plenty.
     
  8. Elaine Spencer

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    was that the day the decent sized tornado hit the Raliegh-Durham area? I remember chasing I think a High Risk (or a Moderate Risk) set up

    You're right about the High Risk set up, but off on the date. I suspect you are referring to the 4/16/11 outbreak that was concentrated on the Carolinas.

    http://www.spc.noaa.gov/products/outlook/archive/2011/day1otlk_20110416_1630.html

    http://www.spc.noaa.gov/products/outlook/archive/2011/day1otlk_v_20110416_1200.gif

    That was another event that in a normal year would have been a headliner, but since it occurred in April of 2011, paled in comparison to what happened 11 days later.
     
  9. Patrick Marsh

    Patrick Marsh Member

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    April 2011 was special in multiple ways. One of them was the fact that we had two 3 day outbreaks. 14 April was the Tushka, OK tornado, 15 April was a tornado outbreak across southern Alabama and southern Mississippi, and 16 April was the big outbreak in the Carolinas.

    25 April was a Texas event, 26 April was the first Vilonia, AR tornado, and 27 April was the granddaddy of them all.
     
  10. Andy Wehrle

    Andy Wehrle Member

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    Small correction. Vilonia '11 was on the evening of the 25th, along with a few other significant tornadoes in central Arkansas. The 26th was a high risk day with a lot of severe weather and tornadoes, but none of them turned out to be particularly destructive or otherwise noteworthy, especially considering what happened the next day.
     
  11. Patrick Marsh

    Patrick Marsh Member

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    Whoops! You are absolutely correct.
     
  12. Andy Berrington

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    Let's not also forget that massive linear complex on 4/4 that produced about a billion wind reports and embedded tornadoes over most of the SE and E-Central US, the nighttime tornado event on 4/9 in Iowa (Mapleton/Pocahontas), the April 19th outbreak in IL/IN and vicinity and the St. Louis tornado on 4/22. Just non-stop significant events really with a couple of historic ones thrown in.
     
  13. Nate Weikal

    Nate Weikal Member

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    Ever heard of the Soviet Union (or Ivanovo) outbreak in 1984? That was Russia's April 27, 2011. One F5, another F4 (borderline F5), and I think another F4. The two strongest tornadoes killed hundreds of people and the F5 reportedly tossed a huge crane through the air. In fact, that F5 might have been one of the strongest tornadoes ever recorded on earth. Unfortunately, that place was still the soviet union, so the gov't covered up a lot of info. Most of the info was collected from eyewitnesses still alive today. If that isn't the mother of all unusual outbreaks, then I don't know what is.
     
  14. Shawn Schuman

    Shawn Schuman Member

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    Yes, that actually happened just a day after the Barneveld, WI F5 here in the States. There are a lot of myths out there about that outbreak, but it's so difficult to discern how much of it is actually based in reality. I have been able to find some photos, none of which have shown anything more than moderate damage. Of course, it's quite likely that those photos don't show the worst affected areas, so again it's hard to really infer anything from them. Here's an album I made with a few photos.

    http://imgur.com/a/e42e7

    The newspaper allegedly shows a photo of the tornado (or one of the tornadoes, anyway), but who knows. The photo immediately above that one is said to show "all the vegetation torn from the ground" (ground scouring), but it's hard to tell for sure. Anyhow, I also found this brief Russian news clip. It should automatically go to the right time, but if it doesn't then just skip ahead to 14:41.



    As for the number of fatalities, I'm pretty confident there were at least 100 in total, but once again it's almost impossible to find real info since the government suppressed so much of the event. I did, however, find this from an author who apparently was there (it's translated from Russian, so it's a little rough):

    "Dozens of graves. I stood next to one of them and asked the gravediggers, "How many?" They immediately realized: "Hundreds! To work for a month will have to. " - How ?! After all, it was officially announced that killed seven people! I heard with my own ears! "They sneer looked at me like I was a fool, and silently continued their work ... Who needed this official lies, which made sense ?! In the end, it is still all about everything learned. Why deceive his own people! .. And who defend currently Cemetery at a time ?! There can be no looting, as happened in the Degtyarev. Yes, sadly to admit this, first arrived on the scene did not rescue teams, not law enforcement officers, not the medical service, and the guys on motorcycles and mopeds. What are they doing there? Provided first aid? It is unlikely that! .. And only two hours later, police appeared! But the chairman of the horticultural sector, although he was in psychological shock after the incident, yet immediately began calling all the villages of the service, the District Committee, Party Committee, demanding and pleading for help. He just did not believe. And while not heard similar signals from the other end of the city, was not taken any measures. How much time has passed, and in anticipation of complete inaction - an hour and a half? But it is well known, the role played by the first hours and even minutes in the rescue of victims, particularly victims of this kind! It was the first two hours! In these terms should be given first emergency medical care! Otherwise, the percentage of irrecoverable losses will inevitably grow. So how many lives we then lost only our own nesobrannosti and disorganization!"

    So, it's possible the death toll was very high indeed. That would make sense if the tornadoes were as strong as they were purported to be, since no one really had any warning and most Russians had no experience with tornadoes. Some of the claims are pretty clearly false, however. The 710,000 lb. crane that was allegedly thrown 200 meters was actually just knocked over, and I believe (not positive) that the "reinforced concrete" building that was "swept cleanly away" was actually unreinforced cement, which would require considerably less force to destroy. Still, they were clearly intense tornadoes, and certainly occurred in an area not normally associated with such large, violent outbreaks.

    It's worth noting, however, that strong/violent tornadoes and even outbreaks do occur on occasion in that part of Russia. Moscow itself was struck by a very large, intense tornado on June 29, 1904. Here are some photos from that event (the tornado photo seems unlikely, but it's shown in multiple sources as being the 1904 tornado. Who knows?) Also, the map is the approximate path overlaid on modern Moscow.

    http://imgur.com/a/VVycU
     
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  15. Nate Weikal

    Nate Weikal Member

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    We'll never know the actual facts of this outbreak. It was still the Soviet Union and the gov't downplayed a lot of the event, so the "smerch" could've been much worse than what the news clip showed (I understand a little bit of Russian). The gov't only wanted the public to see the tip of the iceberg. There was this website that showed satellite images and data of this event as it unfolded and it showed ingredients needed for a violent outbreak were present at the time. The satellite images showed several robust tornadic supercells over Russia. It was also reported that hailstones weighing up to 2.2 lbs fell from these storms. Again, the information surrounding this outbreak was very vague due to gov't coverup, but it is likely that the outbreak was worse than what was shown on the news. The question, which will likely never be fully answered is how much worse?

    And yes, I researched Russia's tornado history and it does get violent tornadoes, but they are uber rare and only occure every 1-2 decades. However, Europe's "tornado alley" is around Poland, Germany, etc. Every couple of years, that region will get an EF3-EF4.
     
  16. Ed Sweeney

    Ed Sweeney Noob

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  17. Devin Pitts

    Devin Pitts Member

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    While not an outbreak, it was quite a significant event considering the area it happened in. On May 25th, 2011 during an ongoing tornado outbreak in the Missouri, a cyclic supercell set up shop in the northern Sacramento Valley in California. It dropped no less than 5 separate tornadoes, including an EF-2 that uprooted over 25,000 almond trees and caused roughly $1 Million worth of damage to that particular almond tree grove. Pictured is the EF-2 in progress:
    ac281ca700a1b4dc4aa21583bb357a33.jpg
     

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