Need Professional Opinion on Atmospheric Anomaly

Jon Joans

Enthusiast
Jul 31, 2019
3
0
1
Mandeville La
Hey you all! I am new to the forum and I apologize if I've selected the wrong forum for this but I am seeking professional advice.

I was hoping someone with more experience might be able to lend a hand. I live in Mandeville, La and we had a weird atmospheric event on July 30. At around 3:37 PM CST I was temporarily blinded by a flash out of my drivers window. I assumed that lightning had struck right outside my car and braced for the shockwave but it took around 5 seconds to get to me. When it did it was the most massive 'thunder' I have ever felt. It rattled the car and kept rumbling for probably 30 seconds after.

I just assumed it was the largest lighting strike I had ever experienced but that night when I got home I noticed on social media that there were a ton of people talking about a terrible lightning strike near them, all around the same time - and some of these people were miles apart.

Is there some rare, massive, upper-atmospheric lighting that can shake a whole city? Could this have been from a small meteor?

I was hoping someone knew of an organization that tracks this type of thing that could look back at the time and date and find out what it might have been?

Thanks a bunch for any help. This was just really interesting to me.
 
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James K

EF2
Mar 26, 2019
170
70
6
Colorado
Jon Joan said:
Could this have been from a small meteor?
I'm deff not a professional (or anything close .lol. )
but with what you said about people miles apart reporting the same thing ... It sounds more like that than lightning

Certainly be interesting. to hear what it actually was
 
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Jon Joans

Enthusiast
Jul 31, 2019
3
0
1
Mandeville La
Thanks a bunch you all. I tried that link and it did show there was some activity in the area around that time but didn't allow me to zoom in and get a closer look. I do know that the rain had been stopped around us for at least 30 min or so at the time and that's what just makes this more weird.

Do any of you know of any organization that tracks meteor entries or anything along those lines? I'm sure there is some type of radar tracking data out there but I wasn't able to find anything.
 
Jan 6, 2019
82
29
6
Tyler
Thanks a bunch you all. I tried that link and it did show there was some activity in the area around that time but didn't allow me to zoom in and get a closer look. I do know that the rain had been stopped around us for at least 30 min or so at the time and that's what just makes this more weird.

Do any of you know of any organization that tracks meteor entries or anything along those lines? I'm sure there is some type of radar tracking data out there but I wasn't able to find anything.
There is a tracking of meteors, can't remember where, been awhile since i was interested in that type occurrence, but if that had of been one would think it would have been on the news based on how 'big' you said it was.
Here it is : American Meteor Society
You can find out a look of neat stuff just by doing your own searching.

I think it was a large lightning strike.
Years ago I was with a group that was using DIY gear to pick up only the large strikes, there is a name for them, but can't remember it.
Had to do with receiving Schumann RF signals : https://www.nssl.noaa.gov/users/mansell/icae2014/preprints/Dyrda_83.pdf
Like I said before there was group that was building their own receivers and could pick up stronger signals of the larger strikes.
Direction of the strike used the phase shift of received signal for direction and then multi receivers sent data to web site that could triangulate the strike. This group had a web site that did show it by state, and was fairly accurate.
Find that site if still exists and it will show the strikes in the down to state, and even more.

With the post you made about it, has me wanting to go back to that and build my own again.
The pickup coils were huge, required two about 2 feet long each, perpendicular to each other and each coil had over 6,000 wraps of 26 gauge mag wire. The PC boards were bread boarded with custom software (open source).
 

Jon Joans

Enthusiast
Jul 31, 2019
3
0
1
Mandeville La
There is a tracking of meteors, can't remember where, been awhile since i was interested in that type occurrence, but if that had of been one would think it would have been on the news based on how 'big' you said it was.
Here it is : American Meteor Society
You can find out a look of neat stuff just by doing your own searching.

I think it was a large lightning strike.
Years ago I was with a group that was using DIY gear to pick up only the large strikes, there is a name for them, but can't remember it.
Had to do with receiving Schumann RF signals : https://www.nssl.noaa.gov/users/mansell/icae2014/preprints/Dyrda_83.pdf
Like I said before there was group that was building their own receivers and could pick up stronger signals of the larger strikes.
Direction of the strike used the phase shift of received signal for direction and then multi receivers sent data to web site that could triangulate the strike. This group had a web site that did show it by state, and was fairly accurate.
Find that site if still exists and it will show the strikes in the down to state, and even more.

With the post you made about it, has me wanting to go back to that and build my own again.
The pickup coils were huge, required two about 2 feet long each, perpendicular to each other and each coil had over 6,000 wraps of 26 gauge mag wire. The PC boards were bread boarded with custom software (open source).
Thanks. That sounds like a really fun and affordable project. I used to do a lot of Arduino / Raspberry Pi type of tinkering projects and I love to experiment with that type of thing but I can rarely find the time these days.
 

Jeff Duda

Resident meteorological expert
Staff member
Oct 7, 2008
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Westminster, CO
www.meteor.iastate.edu
Need more details to provide decent help. What was the sky condition? Were you in a particularly densely populated area at the time? Driver's side window of what...a sedan, truck, fork lift, airplane? Were your windows up or down? Were you moving or stationary, and if moving, at what speed? What direction of travel? Don't assume the reader can piece together the situation without being told.