Hurricane structure question

Keith Brandt

Supporter
Mar 23, 2013
19
7
1
Alvin, TX
Watching Laura come in to the coast on the GOES-16 and wondering what is causing the linear radial striations? I would expect more of an Archimedes spiral rather than linear. They are distinctly visible in the SW quadrant of the cyclone in this picture.
1598483521314.png

--Keith
Alvin TX
 

Lou Ruh

EF2
May 17, 2007
189
40
11
SE PA
Watching Laura come in to the coast on the GOES-16 and wondering what is causing the linear radial striations? I would expect more of an Archimedes spiral rather than linear. They are distinctly visible in the SW quadrant of the cyclone in this picture.
View attachment 20885

--Keith
Alvin TX
Not an area I am well versed in, but, I believe this is what is called transverse banding (visible as these upper level cirrus bands). They often form generally perpendicular to the upper tropospheric wind flow.
 

Keith Brandt

Supporter
Mar 23, 2013
19
7
1
Alvin, TX
I sent my question to Levi Cowan of Tropical Tidbits and got this response:
"Those striations are typical when a burst of thunderstorms pushes outflow outward at a fast rate, so you'll often see them right after a big burst of convection like we had yesterday [with hurricane Sally]. Their cause is not known for sure, but they are likely 'rolls' caused by strong shearing of the wind in the outflow layer."
 
  • Like
Reactions: JamesCaruso