How does one chase in an area with outdated radar technology and little resources for chasing?

Pedro A

Enthusiast
Mar 18, 2021
3
1
1
Brazil
I plan on moving to Texas next year, but in the meantime I wanted to do some storm chasing in my own country to get a feel for it before going into the place with the highest number of tornadoes in the world. Problem is that here in Brazil radar systems are very outdated and it's extremely difficult to forecast and find target areas to chase. It took me about 3 days of researching on the internet to find a radar network that detected severe storms, only that it only works in 1 or 2 states (which are a 20 hour drive from where I live).

So are there any other options for forecasting and picking target areas? or should I just sit and cry until I move to Tx? haha
 

Todd Lemery

Staff member
Supporter
Jun 2, 2014
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Menominee, MI
I bet you can find weather maps that are updated. Find them and learn how to read them using internet sources. Having access to radar while chasing is actually a relatively new thing. You can work on your cloud and atmosphere reading skills while chasing what ever storms you successfully find. It’s actually a good way to do it and you’ll get better at predicting storms quickly.
If you try to chase just using radar, you’ll miss out on a lot. Please don’t go it alone the first time you get up to the states though!
 

Pedro A

Enthusiast
Mar 18, 2021
3
1
1
Brazil
I bet you can find weather maps that are updated. Find them and learn how to read them using internet sources. Having access to radar while chasing is actually a relatively new thing. You can work on your cloud and atmosphere reading skills while chasing what ever storms you successfully find. It’s actually a good way to do it and you’ll get better at predicting storms quickly.
If you try to chase just using radar, you’ll miss out on a lot. Please don’t go it alone the first time you get up to the states though!
Thanks for the tips Todd! Is chasing with someone who knows nothing about weather fine? (They would be the driver)
 
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Reactions: Todd Lemery
Apr 13, 2009
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Yes. In my book it's a plus because they can focus on driving and not be distracted by the storm. Driving is one of the the most dangerous aspects of chasing.
 
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Reactions: Todd Lemery

Michael Towers

Supporter
Jun 28, 2007
331
186
11
Machesney Park, IL
You can forecast using various global models found here among other places:

Models: GFS — Pivotal Weather

GFS.jpg

While radar resources in your area may be lacking you can always use satellite as an observational tool to monitor the development and movement of storms:

COD NEXLAB: Satellite and Radar

VisSat.jpg

Between the models and satellite you should be able to plan a chase and understand (to an extent) what’s happening in the atmosphere in real time when chasing. Good luck, play it safe and beware of chasing in “the jungles”!
 
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Reactions: Ethan Schisler
Jul 1, 2014
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80
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When I am not able to chase I still forecast and select my target cities. On storm day I watch the models, satellite and radar and pick my target cells, locations and routes. You can then check storm reports to see how well you did. It isn't the same as actually being there, but it is good practice and safer than the real thing! To make it even more realistic, I run to the local gas station and grab whatever greasy food I can get my hands on for breakfast, lunch and maybe even dinner.