Hail Damage Prevention by 3M?

Mar 14, 2010
291
30
11
Siloam Springs, Arkansas
I just added Madicos protection film (Clearplex) that goes on the outside. I got tired of the lost gas mileage with Lexan guards, etc. The hail guard extending out to protect my windshield is what caused most of the loss for me. The selling point this particular company uses is protection against rock chips and making it harder to break in as well. It's extremely thick and most shops aren't capable of putting it on curved glass that haven't practiced it. I was sent a 15ft roll for the windshield because apparently it's common for the installer to mess up. Luckily my installer was able to get every window completed. He had an extremely hard time on my back glass (17 Rav4). I also put it on my headlights, taillights, side mirrors, and my lightbar. I've only been able to get into some ping pong sized hail, so I can't personally vouch for it yet. It's self healing with small cuts. Anyone else tried this against hail? Here's a couple of links to their site and one of their promo videos. Madico | ClearPlex | Optically-Clear Windshield Protection Film

 

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Mar 14, 2010
291
30
11
Siloam Springs, Arkansas
WOW I have never heard of this thanks!
How much was that roll and did it change the windows operation or tint?
I didn't have any issues with windows rolling down or up. I'm not sure on the price but I've heard it's pretty expensive. The shop I went to said they have only done one other vehicle and it was a windshield only. I think he said around $400 for that. And it's pretty much crystal clear.
 
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I worked with a sponsor years ago who made high grade laminates for bomb and security protection. At the time, we did some extensive testing. The only way to use laminates effectively is to cover the entire window in the frame or holder. This means removing it from the doors, panels, etc., which is very costly. When we coated just the exposed glass, it glass broke out in a square where the laminate was applied. Covering the entire glass section added excellent protection. In many states, using laminates on the front windshield is illegal, even clear material. We had a sheriff test the material on the front windshield, but it scratched in a short amount of time so it would need to in installed on the inside.
 
Mar 14, 2010
291
30
11
Siloam Springs, Arkansas
I worked with a sponsor years ago who made high grade laminates for bomb and security protection. At the time, we did some extensive testing. The only way to use laminates effectively is to cover the entire window in the frame or holder. This means removing it from the doors, panels, etc., which is very costly. When we coated just the exposed glass, it glass broke out in a square where the laminate was applied. Covering the entire glass section added excellent protection. In many states, using laminates on the front windshield is illegal, even clear material. We had a sheriff test the material on the front windshield, but it scratched in a short amount of time so it would need to in installed on the inside.
Agreed. Although we're just trying to stop a much smaller impact. Or at least I am. I have a note from my medical Dr because local laws keep changing and there's always that one cop. Now it's part of my disability which I have the paper and it's been put into the system at the DMV so when it's scanned, it pulls up. Obviously Federal supersedes state. I would have never thought of this but luckily I know a prosecutor and he suggested it. I attached Madicos testing they did. But I don't vouch for it just yet, which is why I asked if anyone has tried it. Hopefully I'll find out soon, in a good way. Lol.
 

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I'm not sure anyone would even notice if you had the front windshield coated. I do remember at a specific angle, it gave off a weird reflection. Some of the applications are very expensive and you cannot repair chips as there is no way to draw air through the crack or chip, so it's likely better to just deal with cracked glass.