Do these look like "Anti-Supercells" to you guys?

sam.leisenring

Enthusiast
Apr 14, 2019
6
1
1
Rochester, NY
During Sunday's severe weather, I noticed these two strange looking thunderstorms on radar in central Georgia. As you can see, one was tornado warned and the other was not. It's weird to me because they both appear to be rotating clockwise, which is in the opposite direction that you would expect. Can someone confirm this or am I just stupid XD
 

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sam.leisenring

Enthusiast
Apr 14, 2019
6
1
1
Rochester, NY
I'm not sure what an "anti" supercell is? The rotation appears the same in both pictures but stronger on the cell on the right.
What i'm referring to is how both the cells appear (to me at least) to be rotating clockwise instead of counterclockwise. Maybe i'm wrong though.
 

rdale

EF5
Mar 1, 2004
7,319
889
21
51
Lansing, MI
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Nope - they're "normal" :) You are looking at base velocity, so the storm's motion is not be considered, but we can tell by the bright greens (strong outbounds) next to the weak areas is implying counter-clockwise rotation. At that distance from the radarsite you aren't getting a good view of the low level structure, and it's not a very strong rotation, so what you consider a hook echo probably is not.
 
Everything looks like a typical supercell to me. I do see what I think you are referring to though. You can see spiral bands of higher reflectivity in the downshear region of the storm that may initially look like anticyclonic rotation, but they are actually just precipitation particles being blown downwind and are being somewhat diverted by the updraft and rotation of the mesocyclone.
Looking at the southern flank of the storms you may even notice a "backwards" hook. Those aren't backwards either though and there is actually a typical inflow region/hook echo, but it is being impinged on by the RFD surge and it's this surge/gust front resulting in a feature that appears almost like a "mini bow echo". The interface of the inflow region and this outflow region is where the tornado is located. Watching the storm in motion on radar can often help clear some of these things up because there are many times that you'll see very typical processes and features be disguised on radar. Hope that helps! I know what you're seeing but I'm not sure I can explain it as well as I should without going overboard.
 

sam.leisenring

Enthusiast
Apr 14, 2019
6
1
1
Rochester, NY
Everything looks like a typical supercell to me. I do see what I think you are referring to though. You can see spiral bands of higher reflectivity in the downshear region of the storm that may initially look like anticyclonic rotation, but they are actually just precipitation particles being blown downwind and are being somewhat diverted by the updraft and rotation of the mesocyclone.
Looking at the southern flank of the storms you may even notice a "backwards" hook. Those aren't backwards either though and there is actually a typical inflow region/hook echo, but it is being impinged on by the RFD surge and it's this surge/gust front resulting in a feature that appears almost like a "mini bow echo". The interface of the inflow region and this outflow region is where the tornado is located. Watching the storm in motion on radar can often help clear some of these things up because there are many times that you'll see very typical processes and features be disguised on radar. Hope that helps! I know what you're seeing but I'm not sure I can explain it as well as I should without going overboard.
That makes more sense to me. Thank you for clearing it up. :)
 
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GPhillips

EF4
Jul 8, 2004
317
50
11
Topeka KS
During Sunday's severe weather, I noticed these two strange looking thunderstorms on radar in central Georgia. As you can see, one was tornado warned and the other was not. It's weird to me because they both appear to be rotating clockwise, which is in the opposite direction that you would expect. Can someone confirm this or am I just stupid XD
These look like two small, otherwise conventional supercells. Both had tornado warnings on them at times. The image attached has storm-relative velocity (instead of the base velocity in your image) in the velocity panels. The top two panes are at 0.5 degrees and the bottom two panes higher in the storms at 2.4 degrees. With the radar to the northwest, greens are relative inbounds to the radar and reds relative outbounds. So at 0.5 degrees, there is a component of convergence and a component of cyclonic rotation seen (so cyclonic convergence). At 2.4 degrees, pure rotation is evident. This happens often with supercells with the lowest elevations sometimes showing this cyclonic convergence. Sometimes this precedes the development of strong low-level rotation, and sometimes it doesn't. Click to expand the image.

KJGX201904141904SRV_0.5.png
 
During Sunday's severe weather, I noticed these two strange looking thunderstorms on radar in central Georgia. As you can see, one was tornado warned and the other was not. It's weird to me because they both appear to be rotating clockwise, which is in the opposite direction that you would expect. Can someone confirm this or am I just stupid XD
As everyone has pointed out these were conventional cyclonic supercells. For future reference, you can have supercells that spin the other way (anti-cyclonic). Even though they're not as common, they can still be severe.
 
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Jan 14, 2011
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You can get anticyclonic rotation in a left mover of a splitting supercell, but in that case the left mover will originate in the right mover and be moving away from it (visible on a radar loop). In the above image, as others have pointed out the velocity couplets are both showing cylonic rotation - in other words simply two cells close together.
 
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