Camera Upgrade Input

Looking to get some input on a camera upgrade I'm planning on doing soon.

Up until this point I have only used Canon products, though not for any reason in particular. I started with a Canon Rebel t1i as my first DSLR in 2009, before upgrading to the Canon Rebel t6i in 2015...which is my current device. My current lenses consist of the Canon EF 10-22mm and EF 18-55mm. I generally use my camera for only still shots at this time, as I also have a Canon Vixa HF G20 that I use for video.

As for an upgrade, I have been looking at either the Canon Rebel t8i or the mirror-less Canon RP. I know there has been a much bigger push towards mirror-less the past few years, so I am definitely open to the transition.

Basically I'm looking for any additional insight on the models I mentioned, in addition to any alternatives that you may suggest (would need to support my Canon lenses with some sort of adapter), with a budget of about $1,000. However...If I were to flip my Canon Vixia HF G20 that I use for video, I would also be open to somewhat more expensive ideas on models that would be great for both stills and video (Preferably 4k video, given my current HF G20 is not 4k).
 
Last edited:
Mar 30, 2008
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For what it's worth, I got the Canon EOS R body and the converter for my lenses and have liked it thus far. The video quality seems to be high at least in good lighting. It's a decent upgrade from my previous 6D.

Pretty happy so far with the transition to mirrorless.
 
For what it's worth, I got the Canon EOS R body and the converter for my lenses and have liked it thus far. The video quality seems to be high at least in good lighting. It's a decent upgrade from my previous 6D.

Pretty happy so far with the transition to mirrorless.
Thanks for the input, appreciate it.

I've decided to go with the Canon RP, which is full frame and mirrorless. I believe it's one step down from the Canon EOS R that you have. Either way, it'll be a big upgrade from the Canon Rebel t6i that I've had for 6 years now.

As for my camcorder decision, I've decided to go with the Canon Vixia HF G50. It's an upgrade to 4k, which was much needed from the Canon Vixia HF G20 that I've had for 6 years.
 
Jul 5, 2009
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I’m probably overdue for an upgrade myself, but not sure I want to try to squeeze that into the list of things I need to get done professionally and personally between now and my storm chasing trip… But I do have a question, what are the pros and cons of “going mirrorless”? Does it actually affect how the camera is used, as a practical matter?
 
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Jul 5, 2009
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I currently have a Nikon digital SLR that is some years old. I like having a good camera for the sake of image and video quality/resolution, but I am not much of a photographer and shoot exclusively in the automatic modes; the only thing I mess with is turning off the auto-focus in favor of manual focus when appropriate. I am still considering an upgrade, because it would still provide the benefit of better quality and resolution. But I only have 10 days until my chase vacation. Is it easy enough to use the Canons that are recommended above, or would I be making a mistake to start screwing around with a new camera so close to the trip and maybe not being fully-prepared to use it properly? My last 35mm SLR was a Canon, so the general switch from Nikon to Canon doesn’t worry me. Although, I do have a decent wide angle lense for my current Nikon, so if there is a good Nikon equivalent to the Canon I would consider that as well.
 
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Dave C

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Jun 5, 2013
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www.davidcrowlphotography.com
I’m probably overdue for an upgrade myself, but not sure I want to try to squeeze that into the list of things I need to get done professionally and personally between now and my storm chasing trip… But I do have a question, what are the pros and cons of “going mirrorless”? Does it actually affect how the camera is used, as a practical matter?

Absolutely there are practical differences. The primary advantages of mirrorless are:
  1. Optical viewfinder: tons of info on screen and full exposure simulation (you can see what your image will look like with all settings applied and even lens corrections). Video and stills assist features like zebras or focus verification, etc. This extra info and full exposure simulation might sound like a small feature until you use it. Especially in low light it is a blessing to have. You can focus on objects or even stars with autofocus on a body like the Canon R5 and see exactly how a long exposure image will look in the viewfinder even if it is completely dark out. You can use the viewfinder to tell immediately if there are problems with highlights, shadows, etc. The user can configure screens to their liking to have a ton or very limited info (on the mid and top bodies).
  2. No mirror vibrations, so no need to take care for it.
  3. Lens flange distance closer to sensor allows for better lens designs with less abberations (not every brand has taken full advantage of this). Sharper and better lenses, or lenses with wider zoom ranges are common.
  4. In body image stabilization is not practical in DSLR, but many mirrorless bodies add 4-5 full stops. That is a lot of advantage especially combined with lens stabilization. Some combos can give you 8 stops and let you handhold 1/2 second tack sharp!
  5. Electronic shutter mode can be used to reduce cycles on the mechanical shutter.
  6. It seems less dust gets into my mirrorless, not sure that is specific to all of them or just the model I have.
  7. Silent shooting if needed.
  8. Usually lighter cameras and lenses, easier to carry around.
  9. Superior autofocus. The sensor can look directly at the subject without a focus chip looking through the mirror. Ths results in more accurate and much faster focus and tracking. Higher models have amazing tracking features.
  10. Faster shutter. This means more images before a full buffer or faster/better video.
While not mirrorless feature per se, a lot of the newer systems also have electronic lens controls that are assignable. Want aperture ring on your automatic lens body? You can program at least one of the physical lens rings on some brands to control whatever you want.

Higher models have menu and screen customizations, control customizations, and a ton of convenience features that make getting the photo or video you want much easier and more pleasant.

Disadvantages of mirrorless?

  1. Electronic viewfinder: not quite as traditional and smooth as optical- it takes some adjustment to get used to but after use many prefer it. On lower models, may have blackout or stuttering effect when tracking fast motion like birds in flight. On higher models most of these problems are gone (5M+ pixels or more and 120fps or more) it is very similar to an optical viewfinder with all the advantages mentioned. Ina year or two, there will probably be very few disadvantages at all to an EVF.
  2. Cost. While brands are switching over, some mirrorless models and lenses are slightly higher than DSLR equipment.
  3. Battery life. Slightly less. In my experience about 75% of a DSLR, but can be 50% or less with wifi and other features on.
 
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Dave C

EF2
Jun 5, 2013
151
250
11
Denver
www.davidcrowlphotography.com
I currently have a Nikon digital SLR that is some years old. I like having a good camera for the sake of image and video quality/resolution, but I am not much of a photographer and shoot exclusively in the automatic modes; the only thing I mess with is turning off the auto-focus in favor of manual focus when appropriate. I am still considering an upgrade, because it would still provide the benefit of better quality and resolution. But I only have 10 days until my chase vacation. Is it easy enough to use the Canons that are recommended above, or would I be making a mistake to start screwing around with a new camera so close to the trip and maybe not being fully-prepared to use it properly? My last 35mm SLR was a Canon, so the general switch from Nikon to Canon doesn’t worry me. Although, I do have a decent wide angle lense for my current Nikon, so if there is a good Nikon equivalent to the Canon I would consider that as well.

If you had a few hours to practice, I think you would probably adapt to a new camera. The Canon R series are all fairly intuitive to use, especially in auto modes.

The Nikon, Sony and Canon mirrorless are all very good, you can't really go wrong with any. Note that Canon R and RP use a generation older sensor (it is still excellent) than the R5, R6, etc. I stayed Canon as I have some great EF glass and their sensors caught up to everyone else, and they have their own foundry and will not have to take Sony sensors going forward. I love their new RF lenses but other brands have great new lenses also. Canon colors and ergonomics have always been my preference, but really all these brands make great bodies and lenses today- it is a great time to be a photographer. There are a lot of very high quality third party lenses also like Sigma, Tamron, Rokinon that over the years have gotten almost as good as brand name lenses and work with all these camera brands.
 
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