Book ideas for Physics??

Z Smith

EF0
Jun 11, 2015
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Illinois
Hi All,

Since I am going back to school, I decided to get a jump on learning, especially with the things I think I might have a little trouble with. I just purchased a few textbooks - one actual text type book and then study guide book for Calculus.

I purchased Tim's Weather books off weather graphics. Ultimately though, the more I know or the more I can take in before and have basic grasp of, the better off I will be.

I know that Physics and Calculus are the two biggest things and I did search and scowered amazon but not sure what type of physics books - when you type in weather physics, you get one type of book but when you type in physics you get a ton. Just need to know what type of physics book for college and what type or a great starter book that is reasonable in price that will help me get a jump start.

Thanks, Zac.
 
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The best advice I could give would be look at a potential progression of classes. I know most universities publish, on their website, a "recommended" course progression for each major. Look at that for whatever school you're planning to go to, and that will get you a ballpark idea. I'm trying to get my ducks in a row to start back school (but not for a met degree) so that's what I've been doing. Looking at what classes I'll have to take to get an idea of what to expect. I haven't gone as far as to buy books or anything, but I am preparing myself for the various networking certifications that I'll be expected to get.
 

Jeff Duda

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Oct 7, 2008
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You'll be expected to take a full-blown calculus-based physics course. I'm pretty sure that any major university that offers an undergrad meteorology program also offers these types of physics classes (usually 201 or something like that). The book I used was University Physics, 11th Ed. by Young and Freedman. That was nearly 10 years ago, however, and they were on the next edition by the time I was done with the two-course sequence I had to take at ISU. By now that book is probably on the 15th edition or something.

There are books specialized for the physics of meteorology. Look for thermodynamics textbooks or textbooks on atmospheric science. A pretty commonly-used one for introductory purposes is Atmospheric Science - an Introductory Survey, 2nd Ed. by Wallace and Hobbs.

Calculus books are more varied than physics books. There are all different sorts of publishers and authors. Just about anything newer you find will be appropriate.

Sad to say, but Tim's books are pretty useless in a BS meteorology program. They're certainly good if you want to get a taste of the operational side of things, but they just don't offer all that much science. Those books are more like tech manuals than anything. You can still learn a lot about meteorology from them, though.
 
Sep 8, 2014
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I can't remember which Calculus book I had but I used it for Calc I, II, and Multivariable. It was a decent book. I would suggest to start learning the Calc material first as Physics mainly just utilizes what you have learned from Calc. Find a Calc book that covers everything from Calc I to Multivariable and start working through it. Getting a headstart now should make things a lot easier during the semester.

Also, I need to see someone do an example problem in order for me to learn. YouTube is very helpful for this as there are a ton of videos of people doing Calc example problems. I found these to be awesome when I was taking linear algebra and reading the book wasn't helping. I wish I would have realized to look for videos sooner when I was taking Calc...

Sent from my SM-G900V using Tapatalk
 
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Z Smith

EF0
Jun 11, 2015
10
2
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37
Illinois
Thanks, I appreciate the response. I found a calculus I and II book that covers nearly everything and then a workbook/study guide book and also the main Atmospheric Science book you I would use. Think I am all set now.