Bonded Cellular?

Mar 5, 2010
330
52
11
Cascade, CO
So maybe bonded cellular is not what I am looking for. I stream constantly. Its a bit of an income source for me. I am trying to find a way to always have a signal. Is there a way to have Verizon and ATT at the same time? Is that bonded cellular?

How can I use different providers seamlessly?
 

Bob W

EF0
Jan 18, 2021
10
8
1
Leland, NC
So maybe bonded cellular is not what I am looking for. I stream constantly. Its a bit of an income source for me. I am trying to find a way to always have a signal. Is there a way to have Verizon and ATT at the same time? Is that bonded cellular?

How can I use different providers seamlessly?
If you are streaming video via IP, and you want to use multiple carriers simultaneously, then bonded cellular is what you are after.
A little explanation of how it works. Basically you have multiple cellular radios up at the same time. These radios may be the same carrier, or multiple for redundancy - A, V, T, US, etc. Since each connection results in a different IP - whether the same or diffent carriers - you cant take 4 connections that may be 10 Mbps each and get 40 Meg to stream over. Your encoder would inherently make one stream which would have a source and destination IP, and a port pair. The way bonding works is that there's what amounts to a router that creates stream(s) from you to an endpoint at the streaming provider where the quality of these streams is constantly evaluated. The router on your end - and at the remote end - takes your data stream containing your video, and splits it up among all the paths - basically a virtual tunnel - and these individual pieces of your stream are reassembled at the remote and and sent off to the destination that you were sending it to. The "source IP" isn't any of the cell modems. Rather, the source IP is that of the thing in a data center somewhere that's putting the multiple pieces back together. This costs money beyond just having - say four - cell modems. You're also paying for the bonding. Put bonded cellular into Goo, and you'll see results.

Since you are streaming video, another possibility is LiveU. it takes video, and does the compression and transport over multiple radios. We (a broadcaster) use these Live Outside Broadcast Equipment | LiveU They'll bond up to 12 cell radios. Basically we feed it SDI video out in the field, and that video ends up at the station as SDI coming out of a decoder. Like a very long coax. There's other options.