AZ Man Arrested for Flying Drone Near Wildfire

Discussion in 'Weather In The News' started by Warren Faidley, Jul 2, 2017.

  1. Warren Faidley

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    http://www.12news.com/news/local/ar...r-drone-intrusion-over-goodwin-fire/453595514

    Looks like the Feds and local Governments are cracking down. When I first heard about this (before the arrest), I thought to myself, is this guy stupid enough to post the pics or footage on the Internet after the Feds said they were looking for someone? Ah, yes he did and he got busted!

    Many cities and agencies are now banning drones near any type of disaster. Likely a good idea if rescue aircraft are in operation near the scene. But.......

    I believe a lot of this rush to ban results from an odd psychological phenomena I've witnessed as a journalist and chaser over the years with some authority figures. I honestly believe some people in authority simply don't want others to share in witnessing something amazing -- or they get crazy when they miss something seen by civilians and then try to prevent further observations. It's like they want to protect the visual aspects for themselves. And I'm not referring to obvious dangerous zones. I remember shooting an insane wildfire fire in Arizona back in the 1980's when an entire canyon super-heated and suddenly exploded into an atomic fireball. I was way outside the fire line, many miles from the fire, along with about 20-30 people who also stopped in a parking lot to watch. A fire supervisor pulled up, saw my camera, asked what I saw. I told him and he went into a frenzy, saying he was immediately closing off the road. He seemed really pissed off he missed the rare event. The road was never closed. I eventually met up with an Apache hotshot team (with USFS permission) and went right to the fire line. He saw me again and went into orbit. Ha Ha.

    In the same line of thinking, it seems that some Government agencies / individuals want to work without being observed. I'm not talking about secret or critical operations, but everyday events like floods. FEMA recently blew a fuse in Colorado when drones were being used for flood studies and safety. I'm assuming some officials are in fear of being observed doing something that might be perceived as wrong or ineffective -- as opposed to banning drones for safety.

    Anyone else notice this?

    W.
     
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  2. rdale

    rdale EF5

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    Can you post details on the FEMA Colorado story?
     
  3. J Guthery

    J Guthery EF0

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    I don't like drones flying over private property, but in the case of a natural disaster, it won't matter because every jackoff news outlet will be there with their news helicopters anyways. So fire away. Like the OP said, they're just upset that you got to see some action and they didn't.

    Ranks right up there with not allowing you to return home after a disaster. Or forcing you to leave before one. My property not yours get bent.
     
  4. Warren Faidley

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    The Colorado story is here:

    http://spectrum.ieee.org/automaton/...ado-flooding-assistance-until-fema-freaks-out

    So there is a Type 1 (major) wildfire burning about 10 miles from my home. It's in the foothills and mountains and not a threat to my area. A photographer friend went out yesterday to take some pictures. They have closed most of the roads in typical panic mode -- including the closure of roads many miles from the fire, roads that do not lead to the evacuation areas or towards the fire. He says it's like being near Area 51. They are also checking cars for drones. Guess I'll have to go take a look with my Goodyear photo blimp (not a drone). :)
     
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  5. rdale

    rdale EF5

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    No, news helicopters follow NOTAMs that force them to stay away.

    Actually the reason you can't go back immediately after the disaster is done is that the resources aren't in place to support people being back. There's no inner joy in keeping people out of their houses :)

    Correct - you cannot be forced to leave if you are in your house. But if you do leave, you aren't coming back because at that point you're not on your property.

    That was 4 years ago... In drone regulation years that's like a chasing story from 1983 :)
     
  6. Warren Faidley

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    They can't force you to leave, but they often issue misleading instructions to make people think they will be forced out or arrested. Accurate and up to date information is critical for people to make a logical, timely and safe decision. These knee jerk reactions only make people want to stay put the next time there is danger.

    This never happened before 911, but the mentality today is treating every disaster like a 1950's horror movie where a fleet of flying saucers has crashed and the military has taken over. This is going on now near Tucson where people are trying to get up the mountain to rescue pets and being turned away even though the fire is still a very long way from reaching that area. Mars Attacks!
     
  7. J Guthery

    J Guthery EF0

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    I just don't see the justification for closing roads unless the road is obstructed. This is why I leave for nothing. Rita taught me all I needed to know LOL. Government makes a bigger mess of things than the storm ever did.

    And it took all of a day before news cameras were over Bolivar. Thus the big fight over their presence. Maybe rules have changed since then IDK. I'm not a big follower of FAA rules.

    But either way I see no need for the massive quarantine.
     
  8. rdale

    rdale EF5

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    News choppers stay out of the way of aircraft involved in the firefighting effort. Drones don’t :)
     
  9. Greg Flint

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    Good chance the propulsion from engine caused inflow into fire thus fanning the flames causing additional tens of thousands of acreage to be lost.

    He's also lucky he didn't bring down a jet airplane, he'd then have manslaughter charges and possibly be facing death penalty.
     
  10. rdale

    rdale EF5

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    That's a no to both of those points :)
     
  11. Warren Faidley

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    If tornadic storms behaved like forest fires, e.g., they remained over a specific area for long periods, I'll bet you authorities would find a way to block all access. The only reason they don't is beause they can't. Something to think about.
     
  12. rdale

    rdale EF5

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    Absolutely. Just like they'll block off access around a hazardous materials leak.
     

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