Anti-fog warmer for cameras/lenses?

Discussion in 'Equipment' started by Dan Robinson, Oct 3, 2017.

  1. Dan Robinson

    Dan Robinson WxLibrary Editor
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    I wondered if anyone had ever thought about some type of compartment for cameras and lenses inside of a vehicle that would keep cameras warm while allowing the air conditioning to run, preventing the lens fogging problem when taking the cameras outside.

    I have been dealing with this by shutting off my AC at least 45-60 minutes before any storm intercept to allow the cameras to acclimate, but I wondered if any type of "anti-cooler" ideas existed. One thought is to place a couple of hand warmers inside of a small cooler, though I have not tried this to see if it would work.
     
  2. Marc R. O'Leary

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    Lenses being glass, what about something like rainX anti-fog?

    Not sure how that stuff would effect lens glass chemically, but may be worth trying if you have a junk kit lens gathering dust somewhere.
     
  3. David Cox

    David Cox Lurker

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    A regular cooler worked fine in the film days as you didn't want it to get hot either. Digital makes it simpler since there aren't any film issues. A cooler or pelican box would work or leave the equipment in the trunk.
     
  4. Dan Robinson

    Dan Robinson WxLibrary Editor
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    The problem is that when cameras get cooled by the air-conditioned interior, they immediately fog up with condensation when taken outside into a warm, moist environment. (That is, when you jump outside to shoot a storm) All glass surfaces will do this, including all of the glass elements in a lens, the viewfinder, etc. Once the condensation forms, the only way to remove it is to blast the camera/lens with the car's heater. This can take 5-10 minutes or more depending on how cold the cameras were, and risks leaving spots on the glass.

    Coatings like Rain-X aren't made for delicate lens glass and should be avoided as they would damage it. Not to mention the condensation also can form on inside lens elements where you couldn't get to.

    If you're running the AC to stay comfortable, keeping the cameras warm in a compartment insulated from the AC is the only way to avoid the condensation. (Either that or just go without the AC leading up to storm time, as I've been doing.) I think the small cooler with some hand warmers inside is probably the simplest way to do this. I just wondered if anyone had ever built something more permanent.
     
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  5. David Cox

    David Cox Lurker

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    The cooler or pelican box always worked for me in Florida. The hand warmers would give you an added margin. You did get me thinking about the Coleman thermoelectric cooler I have. It can cool or warm but has never been very good at either. It would keep camera warm though. That might be what you need if you have the room.
     

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