A List of Learning Resources

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JImboden

Thanks for compiling such a great list of resources. It's really made it easy to figure out what I don't know (which is just about everything) and start learning it.
 

AndrewMoore

Just a quick thanks to Ric Burney and Dneal for the links! I found them very useful!
 

dragonmwt

I would just like to thank everyone that has contributed to this post. I have lots of new reading material to go through. I am very grateful. I will be reading everything that I can to learn and this is a great start.
 
Mar 4, 2015
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Matamoras, PA
Brian. I did not know that. I'm glad you told me ... and I have already updated the my sources page (http://raob.com/data_sources.php). After I loaded one of COD's sounding files, I went to the "Properties" option (under the File Menu) and saw that COD is encoding their sounding data in the standard and very popular PAOS format. PAOS = Program in Atmospheric & Oceanic Sciences, which is located at the University of Colorado at Boulder.
 
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Brian G

EF2
Sep 25, 2014
105
25
11
St. Louis, MO
Brian. I did not know that. I'm glad you told me ... and I have already updated the my sources page (http://raob.com/data_sources.php). After I loaded one of COD's sounding files, I went to the "Properties" option (under the File Menu) and saw that COD is encoding their sounding data in the standard and very popular PAOS format. PAOS = Program in Atmospheric & Oceanic Sciences, which is located at the University of Colorado at Boulder.
Ah...that explains it. By the way, it also works for the point forecast soundings from the GFS, NAM, etc too. Just click a point anywhere on the map and it'll pull up the sounding. Then you can click the Raw Sounding Text link underneath the skew-t. It's pretty similar to how TwisterData works.
 
Mar 4, 2015
28
13
6
Matamoras, PA
Brian, thanks again for the additional information. Let me know if you ever find that RAOB is not able to decode a sounding file ... and if the data is freely available, I can create a decoder for it. If the sounding file is not freely available to the public, but is widely used, then I can also add a new decoder.
 
Jul 5, 2009
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900
21
Newtown, Pennsylvania
When I prepared to start chasing on my own in the late ‘90s, one of the resources I used was Tim Marshall’s Tornado Forecasting Workbook. It contained a number of historical weather maps to practice forecasting the day’s events. Is anyone aware of a similar, updated resource that exists today, perhaps online? Direct practice like this, with feedback in the form of the “answer” being what actually happened that day, is the best way to hone analysis and forecasting skills. The SPC site has the past events page with all of the maps available for each day, but that contains only the most significant events so the problem is potential recognition of the date and existing knowledge of what happened. In addition, I believe Tim Marshall’s book also included some “null” problem sets, where nothing actually happened that day.

BTW, I happened upon this old thread while looking for someplace to post this. In browsing the thread, I noticed that Rich Thompson’s tornado forecasting video series is not listed on here. I don’t have the link at the moment, but wanted to at least mention it. Perhaps someone else can post the link.
 
Nov 25, 2008
229
42
11
Dallas,TX
www.wxdallas.com
When I prepared to start chasing on my own in the late ‘90s, one of the resources I used was Tim Marshall’s Tornado Forecasting Workbook. It contained a number of historical weather maps to practice forecasting the day’s events. Is anyone aware of a similar, updated resource that exists today, perhaps online? Direct practice like this, with feedback in the form of the “answer” being what actually happened that day, is the best way to hone analysis and forecasting skills. The SPC site has the past events page with all of the maps available for each day, but that contains only the most significant events so the problem is potential recognition of the date and existing knowledge of what happened. In addition, I believe Tim Marshall’s book also included some “null” problem sets, where nothing actually happened that day.

BTW, I happened upon this old thread while looking for someplace to post this. In browsing the thread, I noticed that Rich Thompson’s tornado forecasting video series is not listed on here. I don’t have the link at the moment, but wanted to at least mention it. Perhaps someone else can post the link.
Here you go: Tornado Forecasting Workshop Series
 
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