2021-05-29 REPORTS: CO/OK/NM

Dave C

EF2
Jun 5, 2013
122
176
11
Denver
www.davidcrowlphotography.com
Began the day getting to the low/boundary near Springfield Colorado in good time for initiation off the higher terrain. Spent about three hours watching a stationary supercell flounder and then strengthen quickly as it finally got a small push from a shortwave and the low shifted. The storm moved from near Kim, CO. and began tracking east very slowly, and then cutting almost due south before returning to southeast before eventually dying near Boise City.

I was in a convoy escorting friends on dry dirt roads in their sedan, and also had forgotten to load my OK roads in GRlevel3, so did not pursue thru the Canyon on the more sandy dirt road from Colo. to Boise City. I did drop back to Campo and hit pavement to get south, and the structure was not that great anymore when I got down to Boise City.

Decided not to stay out and chase tomorrow as I saw a great tornado series Wednesday in NE, and I could use a break. Home is only 4.5 hours from Boise City and seemed reasonable at the time. Unfortunately, I went thru La Junta on the way home, and they had bad flooding with a foot of water in some streets. Got trapped in a bad MCS with small hail and torrential rain for almost 2 hours, made the return exhausting. Colorado also has some of the most dangerous, pathetic road construction zones with incredibly narrow lanes and some of the roughest car destroying roads in the country. Other states seem to warn for uncomfortable bumps. In Colorado you are lucky to get a warning sign for a cliff or car destroying feature.

Sadly, I must report that imbecile behavior of the average chaser is continuing to get worse. I witnessed an idiot with a loud diesel truck leave it running so no one could enjoy the nature and thunder sounds. His convoy of four vehicles all parked sideways on the dirt road, not leaving the road, all for their convenience and annoying to locals and others trying to get by. The group were a bunch of loudmouths and some twit crashed his drone into power lines after annoying everyone with it for several minutes. If this was any of you, please consider in the future that others may like to enjoy the storm without all that noise and clutter, and locals may appreciate your not blocking half the road.

Had several occassions of fools who were out of position going dangerously fast on the dirt network and passing unsafely or not courteously. Noticed zero courtesy for people on the dirt network, people seemed to revel in blasting others with dust- is it no longer common manners to slow down some on dirt when passing others out of their vehicles? If those few seconds of slowing are too much for your chase, maybe you are already behind the decision curve... The average chaser these days acts like they are missing something epic when nothing at all is going on, the desparation and selfishness is beyond me. Seen so many people going crazy even on outlfow dominant decaying garbage just because it was tornado warned; they have no idea what they are doing or how to read the current situation. Today had someone pull out right in front of me (50 yards or less) onto the highway in a 65MPH zone doing 20MPH. A guy last week passed me in no passing zone on a blind hill and then swung his car at me deliberately and aggresively. In short, there is a significant increase in the me crowd and the mentally ill who are a large swath of chasers; this is why I am happy to know so few people in the community. Seems the majority of people acting like this are the lesser skilled and have more attention getting junk on their vehicles as a trend. Not much to do about but buy dash cams and report it, put up with it, or find a new hobby; the wrong kind of people are truly everywhere.

Anyway enough of my rant but it was a part of the experience today, here are a few photos of a not too bad chase:

Some good positive bolts for the first hour as the storm tried to organize.
4G7A0852.jpg

Storm starting to rapidly get a meso and move south.
4G7A0874-2.jpg

The structure became quite decent. It really looked like there was a large wall cloud or possible large cone wrapped in rain for a few minutes. I was not able to get a photo at the optimal time this feature could be seen due to hills, and driving in a group of vehicles on dirt. Perhaps someone else has photo verification of the tor report.
4G7A0886.jpg
 
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Matt Hunt

EF3
Aug 2, 2009
249
101
11
Twin Falls, ID
I have a similar story as Dave, though I didn't encounter any idiots... on this day! Definitely seems to be more and more of that, unfortunately.

I actually considered going further north and targeting the Palmer Divide. Went up to La Junta where I figured I could go either north or south. Decided to stick with south, closer to the surface low.

From La Junta I watched this storm develop from a little cumulus cloud. Actually, there were several failed attempts that went up before one finally broke through. It looked like it might form a line. When it did go up, it was nearly stationary, if not moving in reverse, or at least back-building. It was high-based for several hours as well, but I knew I should stick with it due to, as Dave mentioned, a shortwave coming in later that would start to push it east, and backed surface winds that awaited further east. (although it didn't really cover a lot of distance to the east)

It was amazing how quickly it went from being high-based, to starting its move east, forming a lowering, wall cloud, and tornado. And yes, it was a tornado. I also have some video, while from a distance away, you can faintly see vortices spinning around on the ground underneath the cone. The velocity couplet became really tight as well, and I believe the tornado continued well after it became obscured with rain.

DSC_9151-2.jpg

Pretty sure that's the longest I've ever chased one storm, and over the shortest distance! I think it was about 8 hours spent with that storm, and only moving from Kim, CO to Boise City, OK.
 
Dec 8, 2003
1,380
388
11
Southeast CO
www.youtube.com
I'm only posting because I was expecting others to post some tornado pictures from OK, which I don't have, but I do have this vidcap. This is when it was due east of Kenton OK at sunset, and my only video frame backlit by lightning. Looking due N.

BillsVersionReedit.jpg

There were confirmed tornado reports a few minutes before and after this, but I saw no tornado.

I had intercepted the storm about 5:00 MDT west of Pritchett CO and sat there for about an hour (and saw exactly the same views as in the above photos). I know from experience that storms can sit somewhere and do nothing for hours and then suddenly explode when something changes. Nevertheless I gave up on it sometime around 6 when I saw some new convection looking pretty stout coming off the Palmer Divide. Honestly though, my mind mostly pondered where to eat in Lamar on my way home.

18 miles from Lamar I noticed the storm looking better on radar. 17 miles from Lamar it got tor-warned. I did a U-turn, knowing that I was probably going to have to now drive straight to Boise City to re-intercept, which I did. It was a lot of driving to chase a storm for maybe a half-hour at sunset, but my opportunity to catch a tornado seemed pretty decent. Oh well. I might have watched it a little longer, even in the dark, but I needed to get back to Boise City and scurry up 287 if I was going to beat the storm to that point to get home. That area of mesas in my photo looks kinda intriguing. It's the Black Mesa park, where the highest point in OK can be found, and I think I'll return some day to explore it.
 

Dave C

EF2
Jun 5, 2013
122
176
11
Denver
www.davidcrowlphotography.com
I have a similar story as Dave, though I didn't encounter any idiots... on this day! Definitely seems to be more and more of that, unfortunately.

I actually considered going further north and targeting the Palmer Divide. Went up to La Junta where I figured I could go either north or south. Decided to stick with south, closer to the surface low.

From La Junta I watched this storm develop from a little cumulus cloud. Actually, there were several failed attempts that went up before one finally broke through. It looked like it might form a line. When it did go up, it was nearly stationary, if not moving in reverse, or at least back-building. It was high-based for several hours as well, but I knew I should stick with it due to, as Dave mentioned, a shortwave coming in later that would start to push it east, and backed surface winds that awaited further east. (although it didn't really cover a lot of distance to the east)

It was amazing how quickly it went from being high-based, to starting its move east, forming a lowering, wall cloud, and tornado. And yes, it was a tornado. I also have some video, while from a distance away, you can faintly see vortices spinning around on the ground underneath the cone. The velocity couplet became really tight as well, and I believe the tornado continued well after it became obscured with rain.

View attachment 21785

Pretty sure that's the longest I've ever chased one storm, and over the shortest distance! I think it was about 8 hours spent with that storm, and only moving from Kim, CO to Boise City, OK.
Well done, that's a beautiful photo of the storm during the tornado. I also have gopro video that confirms the motion of the cone as it lowers and condenses and have have seen several photos from slightly more south angles that are less rain wrapped. This was my second experience with such a slow moving storm, the first being 2017 in Protection, KS where only one storm broke the cap right on a boundary and moved about 10 miles in several hours. Wish more storms would do that!
 
Jan 16, 2009
674
716
21
Kansas City
I did like everyone this day I think and went to Springfield Colorado and followed the storm as it produced by Kim Colorado. As it shifted more to the SE I drove around the storm by Boise City and watched a funnel that may have touched down just a few miles from NM. I did not get great photos of much but here are a couple followed by a quick video of the Kim tornado.

1.jpg 2.jpg

 
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