2011-04-27 MISC: AL,TN,MS,KY,OH,IN,WV,GA

Feb 11, 2009
58
0
5
I can't figure out where they shot that video. Nothing in the aerial imagery lines up with what shows up in the video. Makes me think either they didn't name the correct location in the vid clip, or the aerial photos are really old, which I doubt. In the video we can see a small building with a bunch of trees immediately behind it to the southwest. The aerial imagery shows no such building with trees immediately southwest of it like what shows up in the video. The video would have had to be shot on the west side of the apartment complex by the orientation of the vehicles and the approach angle of the tornado.
The video was indeed shot on the west side of the building. The first shot is from google maps. The second is a bird's eye view from bing maps showing the approximate location of their apartment. The last is from google street view. The trees are likely along 27th street just east of 10th. The perceived proximity to the building in the foreground is a foreshortening illusion likely caused by having the camera zoomed in a bit. The trees are actually much taller than they look in the video, it's just that they're about 200 yards away.





 
Feb 19, 2004
1,375
30
11
42
Erie IL
www.svtperformance.com
The video was indeed shot on the west side of the building. The first shot is from google maps. The second is a bird's eye view from bing maps showing the approximate location of their apartment. The last is from google street view. The trees are likely along 27th street just east of 10th. The perceived proximity to the building in the foreground is a foreshortening illusion likely caused by having the camera zoomed in a bit. The trees are actually much taller than they look in the video, it's just that they're about 200 yards away.





Ahh, okay. Nice work man! Unfortunately those guys look like they took a direct hit. Hope everyone made it through ok.
 
Jan 7, 2008
537
7
11
45
Bryan, TX
I don't think anyone posted this video yet--supposedly of Tuscaloosa tornado (and sure looks like it with the horizontal vortices and general shape), but somehow not much damage when it goes over this complex:

http://www.youtube.com/user/MrEverduarte

You'll see debris and hear the tornado. Very lucky the glass didn't break and no one hurt.
 
Mar 21, 2005
1,188
29
11
Kearney, NE
I don't think anyone posted this video yet--supposedly of Tuscaloosa tornado (and sure looks like it with the horizontal vortices and general shape), but somehow not much damage when it goes over this complex:

http://www.youtube.com/user/MrEverduarte

You'll see debris and hear the tornado. Very lucky the glass didn't break and no one hurt.
Good lord. When I showed the video (of the guy in his car that had the tornado coming towards him, moved a couple of blocks and shot it as it went behind him), to my brother he said, "I wonder how many of the people who died had video cameras in their hands?". This video makes me realize it was probably more than a few.
 
Dec 9, 2003
4,840
117
11
Oklahoma
Note that there has been a late upgrade of one of the tornadoes in the HUN NWSFO to EF5:

[FONT=lucida sans typewriter, lucida console, courier]...ADDITIONAL INFORMATION LEADS TO AN UPGRADE OF DEKALB COUNTY
TORNADO FROM APRIL 27TH TO AN EF-5...

AN ADDITIONAL GROUND SURVEY BASED ON NEW INFORMATION WAS CONDUCTED
ON JUNE 15TH ALONG A NARROW CORRIDOR OF DEKALB COUNTY EAST AND
NORTHEAST OF DOWNTOWN RAINSVILLE. THIS STORM SURVEY WAS UTILIZED
ALONG WITH AERIAL IMAGERY FROM A NOAA OVERFLIGHT ON MAY 4TH,
INTERVIEWS WITH RESIDENCES IN THE AREA, AND ADDITIONAL PRE-EVENT
IMAGERY TO UPDATE THE PREVIOUS RATING FOR THE LONG TRACK TORNADO THAT
IMPACTED DEKALB COUNTY ON APRIL 27TH.
[/FONT]
KHUN PNS (2038 UTC 6/17/11)
 
Sep 13, 2010
41
0
5
Norman, OK
Almost two months later and the Weather Channel is still spreading false information. Today's fail comes from Jim Cantore on Twitter:

NWS upgraded the Dekalb county, AL of Apr. 27th EF 5. That makes 6 for that outbreak. There were 7 for the SuperOutbreak of '74
No. That now makes 4 EF5s on April 27th (6 for 2011) and the Super Outbreak had 6 F5s.

Also, earlier this week, I heard a reporter on TWC say there were 292 tornadoes on the 27th. Again, no. There are 292 preliminary tornado damage reports on the SPC webpage.

I've given up hope that the facts of this event will ever get correctly reported by the media.
 

rdale

EF5
Mar 1, 2004
6,906
422
21
49
Lansing, MI
skywatch.org
Great to see Mr Baron participating... Neat conference, except it appears the EM at the end of the article isn't quite aware of why sirens sound. Different weather radios won't fix that.
 
Apr 23, 2010
127
5
6
Updates:
From last year's Guin level event--EF-5
http://www.alabamawx.com/?p=56698

Last year's Tuscaloosa EF-4 revisited
http://www.bamawx.com/
http://www.alabamawx.com/?p=56862
http://www.worldweatherpost.com/2011/04/28/stats-on-the-deadliest-tornado-outbreak-in-my-life/



From this years January storms
I was almost killed when an EF-3 tornado passed just to the north of me:
http://www.srh.noaa.gov/bmx/?n=event_01232012centerpoint
http://www.srh.noaa.gov/bmx/?n=event_01232012
http://blog.al.com/spotnews/2012/01/updated_clay_damage_totals_170.html

This storm pretty much filled in the gaps of last years events. The April 27 2011 Tus-B'ham event lifted at Ketona--recycled as it were, and spawned another storm across from Deerfoot parkway--missing much of Northeast Jefferson county--this years events filled in the gaps.

The set-up: http://www.stormtrack.org/forum/showthread.php?28572-2012-01-22-FCST-MS-AL-AR-LA-TN-KY
In motion http://www.stormtrack.org/forum/showthread.php?28575-2012-01-22-REPORTS-AR-MO-IL-TN-MS-AL
Little Rock hit first http://www.alabamawx.com/?p=56278
Thought we were to just have a squall line http://www.alabamawx.com/?p=56290
On screen http://www.alabamawx.com/?p=56423
http://www.alabamawx.com/?p=56441
http://www.alabamawx.com/?p=56444

Wake up to thunder
http://www.alabamawx.com/?p=56482
http://www.alabamawx.com/?p=56533
http://www.alabamawx.com/?p=56535

Controversy
http://www.alabamawx.com/?p=56552

A giant strode the earth
http://www.alabamawx.com/?p=56559

Storm assesment
http://www.alabamawx.com/?p=56591
Revised
http://www.alabamawx.com/?p=56602

Storm spotter hit
http://www.alabamawx.com/?p=56676

Also hit http://www.alabamawx.com/?p=56546

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/04/28/alabama-tornado-photos-2011-storm_n_854879.html
http://www.weather.com/outlook/weather-news/news/articles/looking-back-january-2012_2012-01-27?page=2http://www2.alabamas13.com/blogs/weather-blog/2012/jan/23/2/photo-gallery-storm-damage-1232012-ar-3099331/
http://photos.al.com/alcom_photo_essay/2012/01/select_tornado_storm_photos_fr.html
http://birmingham.raycomweather.com/2012/01/radar-image-from-ef3-this-morning.html
http://birmingham.raycomweather.com/2011/04/storm-photos-from-you.html
http://blog.al.com/al/2012/01/submit_your_jan_23_2012_storm.html

http://www.abc3340.com/category/230049/tornado-tragedy

http://www.thepinsonnews.com/v2/content.aspx?ID=43694&MemberID=1588
http://www.thetrussvillenews.com/
http://www.njeffersonnews.com/
http://news.mywebpal.com/index.cfm?pnpid=961

How nice... http://blog.al.com/spotnews/2012/01/center_point_suspends_use_of_t.html

Coming to a town near me--just
http://www.alabamawx.com/?p=56771
http://www.srh.noaa.gov/bmx/?n=event_01232012centerpoint
http://www.srh.noaa.gov/bmx/?n=event_01232012

Coverage changes to NWR
http://www.alabamawx.com/?p=56782
Mans best friend
http://www.alabamawx.com/?p=56744
 
Please excuse me if this video has already been posted; it offers a good view of the EF-5 wedge and meso structure as it crosses Sand Mountain near the cities of Rainsville and Henagar, AL around 4:47pm It was taken from the western edge of Lookout Mountain in the town of Mentone, AL. Views of this distance are unusual in such mountainous terrain:

http://youtu.be/KvYlFivAVx8

[url]http://www.srh.noaa.gov/images/hun/stormsurveys/2011-04-27/Suheiley_tracks/dekalbef5/dekalb_lakeview_cartersville.png


[/URL]
 
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calvinkaskey

Guest
Feb 17, 2014
384
30
11
Alabama number of tornadoes

There were like 62 tornadoes in Alabama that day. The most I know on any one day in a state is 50 in Arkansas on the 17th of January in 1999.
 
Oct 10, 2004
1,088
133
11
33
Madison, WI
Please excuse me if this video has already been posted; it offers a good view of the EF-5 wedge and meso structure as it crosses Sand Mountain near the cities of Rainsville and Henagar, AL around 4:47pm It was taken from the western edge of Lookout Mountain in the town of Mentone, AL. Views of this distance are unusual in such mountainous terrain:

http://youtu.be/KvYlFivAVx8
http://www.srh.noaa.gov/images/hun/stormsurveys/2011-04-27/Suheiley_tracks/dekalbef5/dekalb_lakeview_cartersville.png
http://youtu.be/KvYlFivAVx8
Based on the time given I think that's the Pisgah-Flat Rock-Trenton (GA) EF4. The Rainsville EF5 took a path parallel and a little south, a few hours later.
 
Jul 5, 2009
845
522
21
Newtown, Pennsylvania
This is what always floors me about major severe weather outbreaks. The same thing was true of the Super Outbreak, and probably of other known major severe weather outbreaks (I only know this fact about the Super Outbreak due to this paper). It's sort of frightening to realize that such a major severe weather event can be spawned from a seemingly innocent looking synoptic setup. Granted, anyone with experience watching synoptic scale patterns associated with major tornado outbreaks would've been able to recognize the potential this day had when looking at model forecasts a few days out. But really, the same ingredients that were in this event are in many severe weather events, even those that aren't major:
-a moderate amplitude trough aloft with neutral to negative tilt that was propagating east/northeast
-moderately unstable air mass with mid-upper 60s dewpoints in the warm sector and 80-90 F surface temperatures
-Strong low-level and deep layer shear
-Moderate low-level instability
-A surface boundary or synoptic scale lift to trigger storms

Think about it, how often do you see these features with other severe weather setups? Almost each one appears regularly. Yes, the degree of deep layer and low-level shear was on the extreme end of the statistical distribution, but I have seen such high levels of shear and helicity associated with instability and forcing that did not result in a major tornado outbreak in other cases. There are likely a few smaller ingredients that came together to make these storms spin like tops and drop violent tornadoes left and right. These are the ingredients that projects like VORTEX2 are trying to discover.

Let me reiterate: from a synoptic standpoint, there was little about this setup that was unusual, uncommon, or difficult for the atmosphere to achieve.

I have been reading the book "What Stands in a Storm" by Kim Cross and it prompted me to revisit all 29 pages of this thread. I was surprised about the discussion as to whether there was anything unusual about the synoptic environment to yield such an event. Of course I realize there are many events forecast to be outbreaks but do not come to fruition. But I thought this one was known to be an unusually favorable setup, hence the significantly elevated degree of alarm in the forecasts that preceded it? Just wanted to better understand this issue and also see if, now five years later, there is any further clarity about it, including any papers that you guys might recommend, such as analogous to the one on '74 linked to in Jeff's post above.

Jeff I am quoting your post because I know if you see it you'll respond :) But would love to hear from others as well (I saw Rich Thompson had also posted about this).

A couple of asides...

First, sad to see that so many of the links in this thread are broken - goes back to what Dan Robinson and others have recently lamented. Indeed seems like some historical curation has been lost. Sure, there is plenty of documentation of the event in other places, but here it was interesting to go back and experience the immediacy of it, because it was connected to the time of the event and all of the emotion and uncertainty; it was amazing to see the aftermath as viewed through the lens of chasers struggling to make sense of it all as the enormity of the tragedy became clear. But without many of the links this aspect of the event's history is less than it otherwise could be. I am glad to see many of the links are still valid five years later, but will that be the case in another five years, or 10?

Lastly, I am not yet done with the book cited above but it has been a compelling and emotional read. Despite a few meteorological inaccuracies that I could nitpick, the author does a fairly good job of setting up the event in such a way that even as a chaser I could read it without rolling my eyes; she certainly sets up a sense of doom. And then reading about the aftermath is absolutely heartbreaking. Just an unspeakable and unimaginable amount of human suffering, sorrow and loss. Similar in that regard to "F5" by Mark Levine, which I read a few years ago. But the multiple occasions of parents having to identify their children after they were killed near U of A in Tuscaloosa, man that was tough to read, much more so than "F5." You can't have children of your own and not literally be in tears reading parts of this book. I certainly was...
 
Mar 9, 2016
77
18
11
Plattsmouth, Nebraska
Reading through this for the second time this month makes me wonder where and when this could happen again and if it could be worse. We haven't really seen a tornado outbreak nearly as severe as this since it happened, and lots of areas are definitely long overdue, especially in the Kansas/Nebraska/MO/IA areas, living in these areas (basically the heart of tornado alley) and being 15, I still haven't seen a significant outbreak in my area and I'm wondering if it could happen soon.